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Seed Dispersal Posters ~ Teacher Guide, Organic Gardening
Seed Dispersal Posters ~ Teacher Guide, Organic Gardening
Seed Dispersal Posters ~ Teacher Guide, Organic Gardening
Seed Dispersal Posters ~ Teacher Guide, Organic Gardening
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Seed Dispersal Posters ~ Teacher Guide, Organic Gardening

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Seed Dispersal Posters - Organic Gardening for Children ~ Teacher Guide; by Garden Organic UK …

Seed Dispersal Posters - Organic Gardening for Children ~ Teacher Guide; by Garden Organic UK
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For more information, Please see websites below:
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Organic Edible Schoolyards & Gardening with Children
http://scribd.com/doc/239851214
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Double Food Production from your School Garden with Organic Tech
http://scribd.com/doc/239851079
`
Free School Gardening Art Posters
http://scribd.com/doc/239851159`
`
Companion Planting Increases Food Production from School Gardens
http://scribd.com/doc/239851159
`
Healthy Foods Dramatically Improves Student Academic Success
http://scribd.com/doc/239851348
`
City Chickens for your Organic School Garden
http://scribd.com/doc/239850440
`
Simple Square Foot Gardening for Schools - Teacher Guide
http://scribd.com/doc/239851110

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  • 1. Supported by Seed Dispersal Plants have developed different methods to disperse seed Wind 1 © Cecile Moisan Parachutes and Windborne – seed floats away in the slightest breeze. 2 3 © Catherine Lewis Spinners – curved wings catch in the wind to move seed away from the parent plant. © Catherine Lewis Seeds are equipped with ‘wings’ or hairy parachutes to keep them airborne longer. Spinners 1 Hosta species 2 Acer palmatum Parachutes and Windborne 3 Anemone magellanica 5 www.rhs.org.uk/schoolgardening © Catherine Lewis 4 © Catherine Lewis 5 Pulsatilla vulgaris (pasque flower) Supporting Sponsors RHS Registered Charity No. 222879/SC038262 4 Scabiosa species
  • 2. Supported by Seed Dispersal Plants have developed different methods to disperse seed Slingers - use of explosive dispersal. © Katy Watkins, RHS Self Dispersal 1 © Katy Watkins, RHS Pepperpots - A capsule containing many seeds is produced on a flexible stem. The seed is scattered through small holes in the capsule. 3 © Katy Watkins, RHS 4 Slingers 1 Alstroemeria species (Peruvian lily) – Pod explodes 2 © Cecile Moisan 2 Geranium maculatum – Seed capsule separates suddenly, sending seed some distance 3 Lathyrus odorata (sweet pea) – 6 © Catherine Lewis Twisting action propels seed 4 Ecballium elaterium (squirting cucumber) – Seed is squirted out when ripe Pepperpots www.rhs.org.uk/schoolgardening Papaver rhoeas (common poppy) 7 Digitalis ferruginea (rusty foxglove) Supporting Sponsors RHS Registered Charity No. 222879/SC038262 7 © Katy Watkins, RHS 5 Nigella damascena (love-in-a-mist) 6 © Katy Watkins, RHS 5
  • 3. Supported by Seed Dispersal Animal 1 © Katy Watkins, RHS Plants have developed different methods to disperse seed Takeaways - fruits are eaten by birds and animals but seed passes through unharmed. 5 © Katy Watkins, RHS 4 © Katy Watkins, RHS 3 © Katy Watkins, RHS 2 © Katy Watkins, RHS Hitchhikers - seeds have hooks which attach to animal fur or feathers. Takeaways 1 Cotoneaster ‘Coral Beauty’ 2 Ilex aquifolium (holly) 3 Gaultheria x wisleyensis Hitchhikers 5 Stipa tenuissima © Catherine Lewis 6 Acaena species 6 www.rhs.org.uk/schoolgardening Supporting Sponsors RHS Registered Charity No. 222879/SC038262 4 Dipsacus fullonum (teasel)
  • 4. Supported by Seed Dispersal Plants have developed different methods to disperse seed Water Seed is adapted to float. Before the seed can be released, a very high temperature is required to split the seed pod. This happens in some plants that grow where natural fires occur. © Katy Watkins, RHS Fire © Katy Watkins, RHS 1 3 Water 1 Iris species 2 Caltha palustris (marsh marigold) © Cecile Moisan 3 Eucalyptus dalrympleana 2 www.rhs.org.uk/schoolgardening Supporting Sponsors RHS Registered Charity No. 222879/SC038262 Fire

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