Supported by

Seed Dispersal
Plants have developed different methods
to disperse seed

Wind

1

© Cecile Moisan

Parachute...
Supported by

Seed Dispersal
Plants have developed different methods
to disperse seed

Slingers - use of explosive dispers...
Supported by

Seed Dispersal
Animal

1

© Katy Watkins, RHS

Plants have developed different methods
to disperse seed

Tak...
Supported by

Seed Dispersal
Plants have developed different methods
to disperse seed

Water
Seed is adapted to float.

Be...
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Seed Dispersal Posters ~ Teacher Guide, Organic Gardening

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Seed Dispersal Posters - Organic Gardening for Children ~ Teacher Guide; by Garden Organic UK
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For more information, Please see websites below:
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Organic Edible Schoolyards & Gardening with Children
http://scribd.com/doc/239851214
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Double Food Production from your School Garden with Organic Tech
http://scribd.com/doc/239851079
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Free School Gardening Art Posters
http://scribd.com/doc/239851159`
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Companion Planting Increases Food Production from School Gardens
http://scribd.com/doc/239851159
`
Healthy Foods Dramatically Improves Student Academic Success
http://scribd.com/doc/239851348
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City Chickens for your Organic School Garden
http://scribd.com/doc/239850440
`
Simple Square Foot Gardening for Schools - Teacher Guide
http://scribd.com/doc/239851110

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Seed Dispersal Posters ~ Teacher Guide, Organic Gardening

  1. 1. Supported by Seed Dispersal Plants have developed different methods to disperse seed Wind 1 © Cecile Moisan Parachutes and Windborne – seed floats away in the slightest breeze. 2 3 © Catherine Lewis Spinners – curved wings catch in the wind to move seed away from the parent plant. © Catherine Lewis Seeds are equipped with ‘wings’ or hairy parachutes to keep them airborne longer. Spinners 1 Hosta species 2 Acer palmatum Parachutes and Windborne 3 Anemone magellanica 5 www.rhs.org.uk/schoolgardening © Catherine Lewis 4 © Catherine Lewis 5 Pulsatilla vulgaris (pasque flower) Supporting Sponsors RHS Registered Charity No. 222879/SC038262 4 Scabiosa species
  2. 2. Supported by Seed Dispersal Plants have developed different methods to disperse seed Slingers - use of explosive dispersal. © Katy Watkins, RHS Self Dispersal 1 © Katy Watkins, RHS Pepperpots - A capsule containing many seeds is produced on a flexible stem. The seed is scattered through small holes in the capsule. 3 © Katy Watkins, RHS 4 Slingers 1 Alstroemeria species (Peruvian lily) – Pod explodes 2 © Cecile Moisan 2 Geranium maculatum – Seed capsule separates suddenly, sending seed some distance 3 Lathyrus odorata (sweet pea) – 6 © Catherine Lewis Twisting action propels seed 4 Ecballium elaterium (squirting cucumber) – Seed is squirted out when ripe Pepperpots www.rhs.org.uk/schoolgardening Papaver rhoeas (common poppy) 7 Digitalis ferruginea (rusty foxglove) Supporting Sponsors RHS Registered Charity No. 222879/SC038262 7 © Katy Watkins, RHS 5 Nigella damascena (love-in-a-mist) 6 © Katy Watkins, RHS 5
  3. 3. Supported by Seed Dispersal Animal 1 © Katy Watkins, RHS Plants have developed different methods to disperse seed Takeaways - fruits are eaten by birds and animals but seed passes through unharmed. 5 © Katy Watkins, RHS 4 © Katy Watkins, RHS 3 © Katy Watkins, RHS 2 © Katy Watkins, RHS Hitchhikers - seeds have hooks which attach to animal fur or feathers. Takeaways 1 Cotoneaster ‘Coral Beauty’ 2 Ilex aquifolium (holly) 3 Gaultheria x wisleyensis Hitchhikers 5 Stipa tenuissima © Catherine Lewis 6 Acaena species 6 www.rhs.org.uk/schoolgardening Supporting Sponsors RHS Registered Charity No. 222879/SC038262 4 Dipsacus fullonum (teasel)
  4. 4. Supported by Seed Dispersal Plants have developed different methods to disperse seed Water Seed is adapted to float. Before the seed can be released, a very high temperature is required to split the seed pod. This happens in some plants that grow where natural fires occur. © Katy Watkins, RHS Fire © Katy Watkins, RHS 1 3 Water 1 Iris species 2 Caltha palustris (marsh marigold) © Cecile Moisan 3 Eucalyptus dalrympleana 2 www.rhs.org.uk/schoolgardening Supporting Sponsors RHS Registered Charity No. 222879/SC038262 Fire

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