• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Organic Gardening: Conclusion
 

Organic Gardening: Conclusion

on

  • 40 views

The Heart of Organic Gardening: Conclusion

The Heart of Organic Gardening: Conclusion

Statistics

Views

Total Views
40
Views on SlideShare
40
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Organic Gardening: Conclusion Organic Gardening: Conclusion Document Transcript

    • The Heart of Organic Gardening™  September 2007  The Heart of Organic Gardening: Conclusion  Gardening is a skill that can only be developed with practice, curiosity, and accumulated insight borne of  experience. However, it is possible for a beginner, especially one who has chosen to become informed, to enjoy  tremendous success.  The Starter Set: Easy Plants for Beginner’s to Grow  The following crop species are good choices for beginners. We suggest choosing plants from the “Year 1” list if  you are just getting started or initiating a new garden plot. The “Year 2”list expands on the first year’s selections,  though plants on this list have some specific growing requirements.  Year 1  Cool Season  Romain heads  Scallions,  Kale  Salad mix, mesclun mix,  arugula, Chinese greens mix  Snap Peas,  Spinach  Cabbage,  Violas  Carrots  Beets  Turnips,  Chard  Radishes  Warm Season  Tomatoes, Fennel, & Basil  Chard  Cantaloupe  Bush Green Beans  Collard  Dill  Summer Squash  Leeks  Cilantro  Year 2  Cool Season Additions  Peas  Parsley  Rutabagas  Radiccio, Endive, & Frisee  Broccoli (Indeterminate)  Strawberries  Potatoes,  Warm Season Additions  Heirloom Tomatoes  Onions, Garlic, Shallots  Corn  Bell & Hot Peppers  Lemon Cucumbers  Specialty Basil  Thai Or Japanese Eggplant  Watermelon  Robert Hartman and Shirley Ward  Copyright © 2007, 2008, Robert Hartman and Shirley Ward. You may copy, modify, and distribute this text under the terms of the  most current version of the GNU General Public License (see http://www.gnu.org/licenses). 1 
    • The Heart of Organic Gardening™  September 2007  Solving Problems  The first indication that a problem is developing is often a change in leaf color. Yellows, reds, browns, and blacks  all indicate that the plant could be in distress. Of course, if it is near the plant’s life cycle, it could just be  senescence. However, a quick response to a change in color can mean the difference between a crop being  saved or lost.  Problem solving can be simplified by following a checklist that ensures the plants are getting what they need,  such as this:  1. Air: If the roots aren't breathing well, it doesn't matter what else you do. The plants will still struggle. Even if  the problem isn’t air, increased oxygen to the roots will generally help the plant.  To aerate, just poke some  holes with a digging fork and throw in some potting soil or other compost to keep them open.  2. Water: The irrigation system could either be missing that area, or oversaturating it. Overwatering is more  likely when leaves turn yellow. Brown leaves indicate underwatering the grass would turn brown.  Overwatering  refers to too frequent applications that prevent the soil from drying down so roots can breathe.  3. Food: If there is some sort of nutrient deficiency or excess in the soil, it needs to be corrected by adding an  amendment (for deficiencies), or halted (for excesses). A balanced blend of compost, green and brown organic  matter, kelp meal (or fish emulsion), and worm castings can help correct the balance. Having a soil sample  analyzed by a lab once every few years is a good gardening practice.  4. Light: If there isn't enough light reaching leaves or plants, those plants might need to be transplanted in a  sunnier location. If the leaves are constantly wilted, even soon after watering, the plants  might need a shadier  location.  5. Diseases: If correcting the conditions doesn't change anything, then disease could be a culprit. Somewhere  near you there is a plant pathologist or Ag Extension person who can tell what's going on.  6. Pests: These usually leave signs of damage rather than discoloration alone.  Initial Reference Books  Perhaps the best single resource for information about organic farming is Teaching Organic Farming and  Gardening, published by the Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems at UC Santa Cruz. This  teacher’s guide has a wealth of information. Each section contains an extensive bibliography and numerous on‐  line references.  The Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening, from Rodale Press is another tremendous resource.  Although they are not oriented toward organic methods, the California Master Gardener Handbook, published  by the UC Davis department of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and the Western Garden Book published by  Sunset Magazine are also useful references.  Catalogs from Johny’s Specialty Seeds and Peaceful Valley Farm and Garden Supply provide detailed information  about specific plants, tools, and equipment.  Please refer to the Resources handout for a comprehensive list of additional books and resources. As your  interest and skill level grows, you will find the information in those resources to be fascinating and helpful.  Happy organic gardening from our hearts to yours! Robert Hartman and Shirley Ward  2