P          a l                      English            51          ~ebody    RrF    C    etc.            British English  ...
OXFORDU N m a S 1 n PBBSSGreat Clarendon Street, Oxford 0x2 6DPOxford Universiw Press is a department of the University of...
Information in the dictionary is given In entries, arranged E the alphabetical order                                      ...
and particle are very common, or where there is wmething unusual or interesting                                           ...
4 finding the verb you wantlke phrasal verbs are arranged in the diaionary under their key verbs (for example.            ...
4 NotesNot6 are given inN o places.    Before                       * m Y * r .           W <--r--"z-                     ...
At set out, you will see the pattermv + adv + to inf. This dexribes sentences suchas: He st out to become a millionai~ the...
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary
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Transcript of "Oxford phrasal verbs dictionary"

  1. 1. P a l English 51 ~ebody RrF C etc. British English countable noun et cetera (= and so on) sing sth l! singular something uncountable noun Oxford n nounSee also p x for an explanat~on the abbreviations used in the grammar of Phrasal Verbspatterns. Dictionary shows common su bjeds of the phrasal verb for learners of English shows common objects of the phrasal verb shows a verb with a similar meaning shows a verb with the opposite meaning introduces a note on grammar or usage shows the grammar patterns of the phrasal verb idiom(s) section of the entry derivative section of the entry means look at replaces the key verb in a menu box A taboo (see Labels below) OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS
  2. 2. OXFORDU N m a S 1 n PBBSSGreat Clarendon Street, Oxford 0x2 6DPOxford Universiw Press is a department of the University of Oxford.It furthers the University objective of utcellenct in research, wholarrhip,and education by publishing worldwide in Short forms and symbols used in inside front cover the dictionaryOxford New York Labels used in the dictionary ivAuckand Bangkok Buenm A i m Cape Town ChennaiOar es Salaam Delhi Hong Kong Istanbul Karachi Kolkata Key to the dictionary entries vKuala Lumpur Madrid Melbourne Mexico City Mumbai NaimbiS o Paulo shanghai Singapre Taipel Tokyo Toronto Guide to using the dictionary viwith an associated company in BerlinOxford and Oxford English arc ngisFered trade marks o lOwford Universiry Press in the UK and in wnain other countries Dictionary A-Z 1 348-Q Oxford Unlvel~ity Press ZOO?Database tight Oxford Uniwrsiw Press (maker)FI-t published 2001 STUDY PAGES between pages 182-3Second impression 2002 fips on learning phrasal verbs $2-4All rights mewed. Ho part of this publimtion may be reproduced, stored ina retrieval wtem. or transmitted, in any form or by any means, without the lPhrascll verb or single ward? S5prior permission in writrng of Oxbrd University Press (with the role exceptionof phototopymg mrried out under the Eondrt~ons stated in the paragraph headed Are you a naturul born student? S 6-7Photocopymg), or as expressly permitted by law, or under terms agreed w ~ t hthe appropriate reprographla r~gbts orynrzatron. Enqurries conternrng sport S 8-9reproduction outsrde the scope of the above should be sent to the ELT RightsDepartment. Oxford University Press, at the addrrss above S10 ComputersYou must not circulate this book in any other binding or coverand you must impose this same condition on any arquircr Envimmenta! problems S11This dictionary includes -me words which have or arc asserted to h a w proprietary Phrasul verbs in newspapers 51 2status as trademarks ox o t h t m i ~ Their inclusion does not imply that they have ,acquired for legal purposer a non-proprietary or general srgnlflante nor any other Ahmsal verbs in business S13judgement concernrngtheir legal status. In cases where the editorial staff havesome ev~dence that a word has proprietary status this ir indicated in the entry for Phrasal verbs in inbmal language 514-15that word but no judgement concerning the legal status, of such words is made orimplied thereby Using ~hrasal verbs in writing 316-17Photocopying 518-1 9The Publisher grants permission for the photocopying of those pages Using phrasal verbs in the passivemarked photucopiableartording to the following conditions. lnd~vrdualpvrchasers may make copies for thew own use or for use by classes that New phrasal verbs 520-21they teach. Srhool purchaser, may make topres for use by staff and student&but th15 permlSslon d w not extend to additional xhools or branches. under no The most common phrasal verbs $22-25crrtumstanrer may any part of this book be photocopied for r m l eISBN &1%431542-6 bst yourself S261 0 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2AcknowledgementsAdvirory Board: Dr Keith Brown; Dr Alan Cruse; Ms Moira Runtie; Guide t the particles a 349-71Pmf. Gabriele Stein; Dr Norman Whitnry; Prof Henry WiddowronPhonetics editor: MlchaeF k h b yGuide to the Particles: Graham Workman Key to the study pages 372-7&Z pages designed by Peer BurgessNon A-Z pager designed by Sarah NicholsonCwer desrgn by R~chardMorrrsData rapture and processing by Oxford Uniwrsiw P r a I Pronunciation inside back coverPrrnted in Swin
  3. 3. Information in the dictionary is given In entries, arranged E the alphabetical order nAmE describes verb, expressions, spellings and pronunciations used in of the key words and then in the alphabetical order of the particles. American English and not in 8ritish English, for example k t onsb, blimp outlup, duke it out. Main parts of an entryapproving verbs show that you feel approval or admiration. -, L+ - . - 4 7 , . . :eyTT-1.- - PJ* 1 * > ~ - n V v I > - BrE dtxribes verbs, expressions, spellings and pronunciations that are blow mlau: A m E blouf (blew /blu:lblor mainly used in British English and not in American English, for and irregular forms. Iblwn;AmE blcunl) r I example beaver away (at sth), doss down, put (the clock) h c k .disapproving verbs show that you feel disapprowl or contempt, for example dumb sth down, flash sth about. I Phrasal verb, The main forms of the verb + particle < ,blow away: ,I blow sth 1tway to be moved or carried away 1~y the force I$ the wind 1or by sws breath: to m a.e in thls way: It luas so windy thefigurative a figurative example is one in which language is used in a Ron- ., , neurswpr awuw. o sne mew awav cne oust on the .. ~tm r l y bIecuuwayod.sudden b m ze blew his -. literal or metaphorical way, as in His anger b l a d up (=suddenly became very strong) unmntrollobly. ( Definition. The meanings of I ,,,&. lid. & v + nlpmn+ adv ru v+aak+nformal verbs are usually only used in serious or official language and the verb. - (in italic type). -- - 1 ) e i w sb a- y I (iqforrm12) to impress sb a lot; . . . .. .- to surprise or Dlease SD. r saw <L*. uruy last ymr raw -.-. would not be appropriate in normal everyday conversation. Ucamples and it jwt b l Ir 2 (A&, informad, Examples are abide by sth, embark on/trpon sth, viefor sth. sport) to dele: Mitchell bCw o m y the 8humorous expressions are intended to be funny, for example toddle off and Grammar patterns to show other runnprs 6 v+nlpron*a W e t e rounded up some g d speakers for the conference. how the verb is used.informal verb5 are used between friends or in a relaxed or unofficial .- situation. They are not appropriate lor formal situations. Examples are bang on about sth, kick back, tuck into 5th. Further information in an entryless formal synonyms are verbs that have a similar meaning to the main - --.- - <". .,* -.,<,- TN7,- m- - *-*.q,.v, A*. , Special symbols show phrasal verb, but are used in less official situations or are more synonyms and opposites. . common in normal everyday conversation.less frequent verbs or grammar patterns are not used as often as the main Information on prepositions fmm the resz of the g m p . IEEj sNek out 2 phrasal verb or the other grammar patterns given. frequently used with the (adfrom sbtsth) to be much better or moreliterary verbs are used mainly in literature and imaginativewriting. verb. a r t a n t than other people or things: This Examples are yearn forsb/sth, eke out 5th.mow formal verbs have a similar meaning to the main phrasal verb, but are usually used in more serious or official situations, or in a less sblsih) t o o p p m or rehse to accept sththat you casual way. belleve is wrong Parents often stand o8 ogoinst utold-fashioned verbs are passing out of current use, for example, buck up, god rroublasome behnviour for some tune, then give . .- ira. EZ) stick out L r sth; hold out agalnsvror aboutloround,run along. st:hrare verbs or grammar patterns are not commonly used. 8 bv+a&slang is very informal language, mainly used in speaking and sometimes n3 o stand out like a sore thumb t~ be very Idiom related to the verb. n >ticeable in an urfpleas: way: Drvssed like t mt restricted to a particular group of people, for example people of the ,- thrai, y v u I* >w*u d . *.., vur " *- ,h.....h * m e u w * rr6urr.u :;LA r same age or those who have similar interests or do the same job. Derivative adjective related b outstanding udj 1 excellent: an OLrtslanding very obvi-spoken Examples are want in, wont into sth, juice 5th up. verbs are used mainly in informal conversations, for example Teak to the verb. 1 outslQndm~ feclfllres.. 3 {of payment, wvrk, prob- o earths f up! chuck 5th out. Information on grammar - lems. etc.) not yet paid, done, solved, etc: w r e w vtabm verbs and expressions are likely to be thought by many people to and usge. outstanding &bbs o I dont haw any ur outstanding. be obscene or shocking and you should avoid using them. b ouCstandingly udu 1 used to empkasue thewritten verbs are used mainly in written language, for example abound good qual~ty f sth: 01LtSlalLdingiy CYUI@USUC- o inlwith sih, spring from 5th. cessfuf 2 exawnely well: Owen has p h y d out. st aridingly thi
  4. 4. and particle are very common, or where there is wmething unusual or interesting about the verb. For example, phone bock can mean two slightly different thingr (telephonesomebody who has called you: or telephone sb for a second time J; pin 5th ~p means fasten something to a wall with pins: but there is also a noun1 What is in the dictionary? pin-up, meaning a picture of an ottr~ctive person designed to be put up on a wall3 th~s n dictionary we ~nclude several different types of verbs that are used with for people to look at , or the person who appeon in o picture like tho t.adverbs or prepositions, (often called particles). b lthese types of verbs can cause problemsfor learners, and so they have been la dmc Io a i it wrb + partide combinations. Sometimes when you meet combinations included in this dictionary. of verb and particle, it is impossible to guess the meaning in the context from the meaning of the verb and the meaning of the particle. Examples of these arefall 2 Particles t h e (meaning nothappen)and put up with m w l d y (meaningaccept These are the particles used with phrasal verbs in this dictionary, The "shows you mmebdy who is annoying without complaining*).There is often a single-word verb which are the most common. You will find more information about those particles with the same meaning. For example, instead of The meeting was put off until the n m day, we could say The meeting was postpond until the n a t dday: Single-word verbs, howewr. may be more formal than the phrasal verb, or used in slightly in the Guide to Particles at the back of the dictionary. - abmrk I * p l - *about... - ---v> <,"- w,---- above ~=-~.-v-v-37+ ~,"~* across + w#*~.v-~--, ahar m 3-7 F -- " agdnrt ---- ahead r----l#wmL ahetlwF different contexts. dong among aparl * around side *at * OW1 back before behind between own *6or forb Verbs which are always followed by a particular partide. Examplw of these are from *in into A 0 R on! forward rely on, crop up, abide by. These cannot be used wfthout the partide. *out -. --.of onsl ~rouah *t D t 0 fl ,- -c Verbs that are followed by a particle in a particular meaning. These verbs can under upon "with without be used on their own without a particle. but haw a different meaning when they are used with one. Brush 5th u is an example of a verb like this. Brush sth can p be used on its own meaning clean, polish or moke 5th smooth. Brush 5th up 3 Long verbs means study or practise 5th tog& bock the skifl or know!dge that you hod in the Some verbs, such as mme, go,put and take are used with many different particles. post: You should brush up your French bqfore you go t tofaflce. Other examples o In these cases you will find literal meaning of the verb plus particle included for are d / W ofj, gmw/grow up, walkhulk out. completeness. These rneaningr can also help you understand the idiomatic uses of the Many very common verbs fall into this group. Look, for example, can be used verb plus particle. For example, at run around, you will find the literal meaning run in with several different particles, and it has a special meaningwith each one that is difJereentdirections (Its a lovely pork fo run around in) as well as the idiomatic meaning different from look on its own. rook u the word in yourdictionary. o Im really p move vwy quickly from place to place, being very busy (Ive been running around all lmkingfomnrd to the trip. o h k cut! There? a c r coming. a day trying to organize the meeting.). Some more formal verbs also fall into this group. For example you can jbrmish a At the keginning of many of these verbs you will find a menu box with a list of all the room, that is, put furniture in it, but if you frrmishmmcbody with so#~tAing you particles that can be used with the verb, in the order they appear in the dictionary. are giving them some useful infomation. These verbs are: -< .----d Verbs with a partide, where the particle adds to, but does not change, the break orlng roll 1 t c)me rut do fnll give basic meaning of the verb. The particle often adds something to the meaning, hanu Ihold k sap l kit k knorlk lie live look go such as completeness. For example, you a n say ///finish work and then Illgo my moke move pas I pllay pulII push P" run send out or !//finishofJ m wd-and then IN go out.Wnish 08 y emphasizes that you are sat sn . 510RO I ... .. Slay . -! a. STlCK .I. &*I.- lWMW llll. uuln throw 4m.m lu~m, completing your work. Another wimple is wuke/wkeup. You e n either ray w k e ot 6.30 or w k e up at 6 3 . Woke up is much more common than w k . , I I .0 It is also possible to add many different particles to verbs of movement to create which is used more in formal or written English. Other examples are spreud/sprmd hulti-word verbs with literal meanings. For example, we can use the verb w l k in wt,fadelfodemay, ,slonelslmreaway.You will find more information about the these sentences: We walked down the rwd. o He walked up to me and ask& me for meaning of the particles in the Guide to the Partides at the back of the dictionary. a light o We sang as we walked along. o Walk amss the r o d , dont run. These aree Verbs plus particles whew each has their normal meaning. P a bock hw draightfonvard combinations of verb and particles. (meaning telephonesb again) is an example of a verb like this. The meaning of phone back can be worked out from the meaning of phone and back. Verbs of this type have been included in the dictionary where the corn bination of w r b vi
  5. 5. 4 finding the verb you wantlke phrasal verbs are arranged in the diaionary under their key verbs (for example. out) or as a transitive verb with the adverb + preposition out of, followed by a noungiw,move, sit)and then in alphabetical order of the particles. Within each panicle you or pronoun (Ideep out of my way).will first find the verb + particle, with no object. Then there are meanings of the verb Ifthe verb can be used with ""--v- - -"*Fa""" ,msh fnh ah; ,rush Into dolnn & .rush """-W"" , "" -."", 7"-that mn be used both without an object and with an object After that, there are an -ingform of a verb that follows s 3 Into doin~gsth to do or decide s t yI quickly tmeaning of the verb used only with an object. first verbs with people as objects (sb), WIithout thinki ng about ~t I:arehlly; to make sb it. this is giwn at the beginning: , . . .la.then verbs that a n have people or things (sblsth) and then verbs with only thin@as daI this: Dont go rushing znro anyto81 0 YOUobjects (sth).Verbs with itself, yourserf, etc. come at the end of those, and verbs that areonly used in passive forms will be last. For example: This tells you that all these sentences are possible: Dont rush into anything. o p-+y--G- Dont rush into leaving your course. o Dont rush me in& making a decision.TvGzF=-- 9" % w-,*-- .- 7izlx=----- b More information about the grammar of phrasal verbs is given I the section on n give sb up break sb/sth in put 5th ou Grammar Patterns (page x) give sth up break sth in put yourst give yourself up brwk into sth be put oui 2 Common subjects and objects At the end of many i f the verbs, or ad-;ki--?+; ;h;;-;~;s;h at the end of a n u m b e d meaning, wi etc. breaks out, it starts sudden~ly: u; They you will f~nd same common subjects wcluId have go l married in 1939 tT wur, had not or objects. These show you the type brnken out. o Plfire brokeof 4ton aferry) a t e d a y1 The phrasal verb E war, flre, fighting, mw, vlolence 2 ( a h ElThe arrangement of the verbs in the dictionary will tell you whether they o n be used of contexts that the verb is oftenwithout an object, (INTWNZITIVE), with an object (TRANSITIVE) used in, so that you can use it correctly yourself.or both with and without an object. "IbkBk ,Znr ."-- breaks down, it -.- ,----Tw*- if a vehicle, etc, .--*- For example, at breok out, you will see:Lmk at the beginning of the entry stops working because of a fault: he washing Sentences such as Fighting has broken out on the border, Fire hoke out in afor h k down: machine has broken down aguin. o We (= our m - i) bmke down t w k on the m y home. 2 if talks, warehouse. o A furious mw bmke out over the ownership of the painting are therefore very common and acceptable in English.This shows you that in this meaning break down is an intransitive wrb, used You can use these subjects and objects to help yau use the verbs in the right context.at bum down: -"- - - -without an object: My car bmke down on the way to work this morning.Thew arehllo forms of the verb - " ------"m bum down; ,bum sth down if a building 3 Synonyms and opposites. ,----- -- burns down, or sb burns it down, it is destroved When?there are helpful synonyms -w.---., - -- - - - - . - r .+ - . J - - - -- - -. by fire: The p a l m burnt down in the heinel&th ,pull In; ,pullInto sth 1 If a win or a bus pulls or opposites, these are given in in, It arrives somewhere and stops: The express century. o She thracstened to burn the hhr down. eon alphabetical order, synonyms and p~ lled in on lir ne. o The morch pulIed in, boy 27. to opposites that are phrasal verbs 2 (RrKj if a vehicIe or a IWiver pulls in, theyThis shows you that you can use bum down as a transitive and an intransitive mtwe to the skle of the mad and stop: 1 Dull in in firsi and then single-wordverbs. f, ml o the bus o He puEk d intu Ihe pc~ r k i n g f . - .. . Iotverb in this meaning. The definition ";; ,TA; ,;kb k;e ,upl,;ke;;6u-F,c These will help you understand D M~urn~og zneewm. .also shows you how to use it. 1 to stop sleeping: to make sb slop sleeping: Horn the verb and add to your draw in, draw inta sthLook at the b i n n i n g of the entry many timesdws Ihe b a b woke reup in the nrght70 vocabulary. Information is alx, m purr out, pull out or sthfor wr up. rk I uslsually wake up early in the s u m r o You look as if youve only just ken uplo Can you m k e given about the formality of the me up at 8?o He was woken up by the sound of synonym or opposite and whether it is British or American. As the contexts that the synonyms are used in may not always be exactly the same as the original phmsalThis tells you that you can use it as an intransitive verb (What time did yorr wake up verb, it is worth looking them up in this dictionaty or another dictionary to be surethis morning?),and as a transitive verb with an object (Ill wake you up at 6 3 . or .0) that you understand them and how they are used. For example, while knock down - --- - *,out -- -.Up -with yourself (must haw shouted Iso loudly while I was dreaming that -" -c7- ,keep I u t ,keep o ,;th to not enter a place; to remain outside: There m a sign scr ing y R1 can be used instead of break down in the examples given there, breok down cannot always be used instead of knock down.1 woke w f r up.) Keep <aut?. o Please keep out gf the o e 4whtle rc Im woskim. J They hod to get the police to breakkllock the door down. J If you dont open up,At keep out, you will see: v v + a d v + v*adv+prep A Im going to knockhmk the door down. J These old houm are going to be hocked down. I( These old houses are going lo be broken down.This tells you that in this meaning you can use the verb on its own (Danger! Keep ... Vlll
  6. 6. 4 NotesNot6 are given inN o places. Before * m Y * r . W <--r--"z- kl0ng t5 sb (not used in theprogressiue6ast?s) --- w - y . l l ~ - I - - - - - - - v+nlpron+adv v+adv+n v+pron+adv These three patterns are all used with transitive verbs. In order to be able to usea definition you will find information the property of sb:to be owned bv sb: Thea bout the tenses or a particular use k l o n g i to my cousin. 0 That land belongs these verbs cormly, you need to know where to put the object. The patterns showof a phrasal verb: you this. The most frequent patterns come first at each verb v+nlpmneadv v+adv+nNotes are also given after the ~ r ~ ~ ~ ~ X Y X Y - - ~ - . , r t - r r - r - Verbs that can be u w l with these patterns, where the object can go either W e e n ,blaze away 1{at sW&) if m s or people Mazeexamples where there is a particular away, the guns fire continuously: Thegum k p t the verb and the particle or after the particle, are sometimes called SEPARABLEpoint of grammar or use to draw u u r r y, away as the enemy 2 if a fire blazes .I--.-" verbs. They are shown in the dictionary as, for example, tear sth up:your attention to. This b often away, it burns brightlysomething about the passive, or -8 laze is used with the sanle meanings. She tore the IeCter up. She tow up the lette~. She tore it up. + v + a bvwhere the verb without the particle When the object is a long phrase, it usually comes after the particle: She to^ up a//can alx, be used with a similar meaning. the letters he had sent her. When the object is a pronoun, it must come between the verb and the particle.5 Grammar patterns of phrasal verbs v + adv + R v + pron + advTo help you uw the verbs correctly, a simple system of grammar patterns is given With some phrasal verbs the object can only come between the verb and theafter each one. Thew shew you how the verb combines with an adverb, a particle when it is a pronoun. A noun m s follow the particle. They are given in the utpreposition, a noun or a pronoun, an infinitive, etc. and the order in which these dictionary as, for example, fight back sth: fight itlthem backwords o n occur. The short forms used are these:? -A U " 1 "y,3-.rrrrrr.-~,- . I X I 7 . -, .* ...mrr- - ,Fur .",.n*.-nlu .-a>.-. -9- 7- -. mr r- , * 1 - - fight back sth I tried to fight back my tears. ad rerb f- lmn = nourI or pronoun fight itJthem back I had an urge to scream but managed to fight it back nitive (withot P = preposition v + nlpran + adv erb form end n = pronoun There are a few phrasal verbs in which the two park of the verb must be separated .-- doinnl a. nf = ....,.... infin ... by the object. An example is mess sb aboutlaround: = not = verb T h y changed the flight time and d 011 the pussengrs around. r + nlpron e prepFrequent patterns An example of a verb that is used in this pattern is drill sth into sbThe following are the most common types of verb patterns used in the dictionary. drilr sth into sb The teacher driiied grammar into us right from the startveadv Intransitiveverbs, for example: R~II-IVB. break down My cur broke down this morning. A few phrasal verbs are only used in the passive. for example: klge2 carried away. hang around There was o group of kids hanging omund outside. The verb patterns will show you how to use these verbs. belget carried away will sit down have the pattern beiget + v + adv. betget stuck with sth will have a pattern Come in and sit down. be/@ + verb + prep.v + PWP These are verbs followed by a preposition. For example: Other phrasal verbs that are used with objects can also be used in the passive for rely on sblrth You con rely on me. example: The dm1 has been called ofl. Where this is common you will find an call k r sb Ill call for you at 8. example of the passive and a note. Verbs with the pattern v + prep are not usually come across sth I came across an interning book in the used in the passive. If they are, you will find a note about this (see rely on sblsth). library Orher pcrttemsv + adv + prep Some verbs are followed by an adverb and a preposition: You can easily work out how to use verbs with different patterns. For example, if you put up with sblsth How do p u put up with him? look at take sb up on sth, you will see the pattern v + nipron + adv + prep. This settle down to sth Come on children, m l e down to work now. shows you that the verb is used in sentences like this: keep out of sth Keep out of the kitchen until Ive finished I i i like to _ t o k e ~ u p ~ - o n ~your offerof o M f o r the night - ~ cooking. v + pron + adv + prep These lad two groups are sometimes called INSEPARABLEverbs as the object always follows the particle.
  7. 7. At set out, you will see the pattermv + adv + to inf. This dexribes sentences suchas: He st out to become a millionai~ the time he was thirty. ? byBoom out sth has two patterns:r+adv + nIdioms She boomed out instructions.v + adv + speech A voice boomed out, Nobody move!6 Building your vocabularyMany phrasal verbs have idioms ,l,WF.., . *--> a dug - ,+.-,rm. t *--. -,-.*lrl-.m ,bite alt offtocu sth off by biting f She bit off h t a piec .e of c h m h , o Hisfinger had k e n bitten te. rry*,. abidela-! ablde by ath 0to aocept d m a law an agreement. a decisio~ u etc. d obeg themilt Members n & abide by the rules 4f theclub rules, daclslm, the law )S*ll) comply (wlth nth) e V+PWP _ Accoantforsthcanbewedinthepassim: T h w i ~ i s a a * l * w f O rby rwmeses gzzi lor mwIjMto say that it is impossible to know why sb likes sbfsththat yw do not like at . all:humomw)She lor iwte! t seems to like you. Well - Iheres m acwurttingrelated to them. You will find theseimmediately after the grammar g$ 033 adv+n + v+r .. to snout tflbte/snap ~ D Smean om (lwormag abound{anbarndl accustom ieaknstmn/patterns. The idioms in the at sb or speak to them angrily, often for no good abouml in#Hh s h (urrittkn)to have a lot of ee,custom a$ryoumw t reason: Ionly asked him when the work w l d bt sth; to contain a lot of sth: The rm them i ,murself to doing dh (forno to make abound hiwithfish. stdyourself familiar w ~ t h to k a m e used to sth;in some way to the meaning of the *n Ean ( i ~ r n a to trv to do ~n ev+prep sth: It shouldnt lake iom lo m W m w u r slu-phrasalverbwhereyoufindthem, toomucho~sththatistoohiffic~tfory~~:~his d ~ n lo working in b o It hmk o while forFor example: time hes bitten flmore than he mn chew. -,, .,- sCCedslakstdl .hwahve nouns and C p d i S a s . accede to sth ( r o m l ) to agree to or allow sth that sb has asked for, often after you have bermto accuslom themseltres 0 thedark Q v n + prep ImNouns and adjectives that are related in meaning to a particular phrasal verb are onmwedlt forawhile: T h e n o w m m a n t ~ achete~kl ~ pii~icp-ure ta review the agiven after the grammar patterns or any idioms. Sometimes the derivative has ESTl request, denwan&, prerrm ache for sb- to have a atrong desire formore than one meaning, each one relating to different uses of the phrawl verb. -A-etosthcanbeus*inthem~: ~bl~~wtodosth:f~achfnglbr~. E 3 lone k r sbfsthto find the =me dmvative with a -- -r --- -.--- ----- --You will find the meaning at the appropriate entry, with a link to show you where --. ,mix sb up: b ya ,mixedI up to mate sb d - k -3 ..-. ..-. -47% > - . Have~llour 0V+PEP requests k e n u.xeded to? Qv+pre~ acquaint i ~ m t ldifferent meaning. unable to think r:leady or urtderstand what is account ~ a k u n t ~For example, you will find one h a w:ning: Now y uuw mixed rn up completely! acooud for sbrsth 1 to lmow where s ~ s t h acqualnt sblpurssff wlth sth 0to ~smeaning of the adjective mixed-up Im really c, o n.f m !.o H e g ~mi!xedup and cawht l or what has happened te them,esmially after make sbly~umIf famfl* with or aware af sth: Ine wmwrmzn, He&~d&mlakehissonaIongand~uaint hima t the verb it is related to,mix sb up; be/get mixed up andanother meaning at mix dh up F ,rnlxed-up adj ( i n f o m l ) confused because of social or emot~onal up krd. problems: shes a vew mixed- an acc~dent a natural disaster. All the people or who were wrking In the buiMing hnue nola km m u n l e d Ibr o Them are three files that I mnl m u n t fri wth lhe bELSiness V+"pmn*prep Account for7sbisth is often act /=kt/ -3x e R ~ M ~ ~ E D -at MIX mi up Cwm STH)(with *h), a link from one to . >L W " . . ,, .- used in the passive in this meaning. 2 (old- fushiontd)to destmy sth or kill sb: Olrr guns act rw sth to perform a partlcuLar mle or fun*the other. m u n t e d jorfiveenemyplanes. tim: W l l j l M OLS imWpm&for us?otorge ~ ~ Q V+PWP fines act as a detmmztfomolorisdp. accuunt for sth Ito expbln how m why 5th Dagent,m u l t a n t . I n t e r m e d h w , happened: to h the explanationfar 8th: How da e deterrent EFW serve ss sth you accountfir t e t h l the box has d b p hm QV+P~P peamd? o Poor hygiene m y he amomled for act for ab(also,&on w h d d s b . p t o n s " u b.Study pages the mwm in apes of the dissrrre. the fact behatfj i F sb a& for you or acts on behalf ofThere IS a 25-page section of study pages in the middle otthis dictionary, You can tha . .2 to beaparticularpart of sth; to beapar- t. you, they deal with your *airs for you, for ticular amount: Car crime nmrunied for 28% of example by representingyou in a court of law, oruse these on your own or in class with a teacher. They will help you to learn phrasal al m p o W o l m o Wages m u n t for Iess by doing your duty when you are not able to: Doverbs and give you practice in using them. thun half o the brrdgel. E3 a b r amount, a f ~ ~ you huwea solicrlor actingforyoufo The P r i m (particular) pmportlon, (so many) per cent tuas actrng on hhar o the Qwem o T e Prince f hGuide to the particles FE9 make up sth, represent sth 3 to keep a zwrsuctingon I h e Q w n s behuQ rccord of how the money in your care will be BEd cllentAt the end of the dictionary is a guide to the most common particles used in the spent or hasten spent Everypenny o thefunds f e V+P~~Pverbs in this dictionary and their main meanings. This will help you understand i~amountedfot: 4 to mns~der particularfacb or act on sth (ah& upon sth mrefimn I toverbs better and be able to guess the meaning of new ones that you meet. circumstances when you are maklng a decision do sth as a m u l t of advice, information, instruc about sth, especially when you are calculating tions, etc. that you haverecelvd Thepolice- the cast OF sth: The mst of thefilm and the p m anlng on iqformutionfromu m e m k of thepub- assing wereail m u n t e dfor m Ihemlculntwn of Iic, o I mjusi ucting on instructions.o IF my the cusi 4f the service. lEB take sth Into advicehod been rmerItrpon, this umuld-haw ncwunt hagpznd &lee, lnlonnablon, Imtmctlons
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