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Morality

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An introduction to Christian living

An introduction to Christian living

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  • 1. Christian Moral Living <ul><li>“ So for one who knows the right thing to do and does not do it, it is a sin.” </li></ul><ul><li>James 4:17 </li></ul>Mr. Pablo Cuadra Religion Class
  • 2. Question? <ul><li>Why do you think people commit actions that they know are sinful or wrong? </li></ul><ul><li>Ex: Speeding </li></ul>
  • 3. Aspects of Morality <ul><li>A. The ability to know right from wrong . </li></ul><ul><li>The ability to know good from evil . </li></ul><ul><li>B. The ability to distinguish what is appropriate from what is inappropriate . </li></ul><ul><li>C. The commitment to do what is right . </li></ul><ul><li>. </li></ul>
  • 4. Questions? <ul><li>What is one action you consider wrong or evil? </li></ul><ul><li>What is one action you consider right or just? </li></ul>
  • 5. Christian Moral Living <ul><li>Christian morality is based on the teachings of Jesus and his Church through: </li></ul><ul><li>The teachings of the Magisterium (Pope, bishops). </li></ul><ul><li>The essence of Jesus’ teaching is love. </li></ul>
  • 6. Christian Moral Living <ul><li>Jesus summarized the way we are to live when he taught: </li></ul><ul><li>“ You Shall love the the Lord, Your God, with all your soul, and your neighbor as yourself .” </li></ul><ul><li>Matthew 22: 37-39 </li></ul>
  • 7. Question? <ul><li>Why is loving our neighbor as important as loving God? </li></ul>
  • 8. Christian Moral Living <ul><li>Jesus’ teachings about love have two dimensions: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Vertical = pointing to God </li></ul><ul><li>2. Horizontal = pointing to others </li></ul><ul><li>Faith in God alone is not enough in order to live a good life. We must also love our neighbor. </li></ul>
  • 9. Question? <ul><li>Why do you think people who consider themselves Christians commit actions that are not Christ like? </li></ul>
  • 10. Did You Know? <ul><li>The book, The Day America Told The Truth reports: </li></ul><ul><li>91% of Americans lie on a regular basis both at home and at work. </li></ul><ul><li>Most Americans admit goofing off on the job on the average of seven hours per week, according to this book. </li></ul>
  • 11. Did You Know? <ul><li>Most workers admit calling in sick regularly even if they feel well. </li></ul><ul><li>25% of Americans say they would be willing to leave their families if offered $10 million to do so. </li></ul>
  • 12. Did You Know? <ul><li>23% of Americans would be willing to act as prostitutes for a week for that same amount. </li></ul>
  • 13. Did You Know? <ul><li>7% of Americans would agree to murder strangers if offered $10 million dollars. </li></ul>
  • 14. Question? <ul><li>Do you think money has the power to blind people’s good judgment? </li></ul>
  • 15. Catholic Faith <ul><li>A. The Catholic Faith teaches that “wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it.” </li></ul><ul><li>B. And that “right is right, even though no one else is doing it.” </li></ul>
  • 16. Catholic Faith <ul><li>God is going to judge us: </li></ul><ul><li>on our COURAGE </li></ul><ul><li>to choose what is good in ALL circumstances. </li></ul>
  • 17. Questions? <ul><li>What makes something wrong? </li></ul><ul><li>What makes something right? </li></ul>
  • 18. The Sources of Morality <ul><li>Because we have free will and reason , </li></ul><ul><li>we are responsible for our acts </li></ul><ul><li>and our failures to act. (sin of omission) </li></ul>
  • 19. The Sources of Morality <ul><li>We can judge whether our actions are good or bad by reflecting on three traditional sources of morality: </li></ul><ul><li>A. The object </li></ul><ul><li>B. The intentions </li></ul><ul><li>C. The circumstances </li></ul>
  • 20. The Sources of Morality <ul><li>A. The o bject Chosen (What I choose to do). </li></ul><ul><li>B. The intention </li></ul><ul><li>(Why I choose to do something). </li></ul><ul><li>C. The circumstances (The what, where, when, how of my actions). </li></ul>
  • 21. What is the Object Chosen? <ul><li>In morality the Object chosen is what we choose to do, the act itself. </li></ul><ul><li>The act can have good matter, bad matter, or just be neutral. </li></ul><ul><li>An example of a good act could be tutoring a classmate in math. </li></ul>
  • 22. What is the Object Chosen? <ul><li>Bad matter automatically makes an act evil. </li></ul><ul><li>Ex: Gossiping about a classmate is consider bad matter. </li></ul><ul><li>Spreading half truths about someone is always wrong. </li></ul>
  • 23. Questions? <ul><li>What is one thing you would consider bad in itself ? </li></ul><ul><li>What is one thing you would consider good in itself? </li></ul>
  • 24. The Intention <ul><li>What is the intention? </li></ul><ul><li>A. The motive </li></ul><ul><li>B. The purpose </li></ul><ul><li>C. The end for which we choose to do something. </li></ul>
  • 25. The Intention <ul><li>Our intentions answer why we acted in a certain way. </li></ul><ul><li>Intentions can be good, bad, or mixed. </li></ul><ul><li>Intentions determine whether our acts are morally right or wrong. </li></ul>
  • 26. Intentions <ul><li>An example of a good intention: </li></ul><ul><li>You tutor a friend because you want him or her to do well on the upcoming test. </li></ul><ul><li>In this example, what you choose to do, the Object, and why you choose to do it are both good. </li></ul><ul><li>The act is good. </li></ul>
  • 27. Intentions <ul><li>Our intentions may also be mixed. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: You can give money to a charity for two reasons: </li></ul><ul><li>First, you wish to help the poor. </li></ul><ul><li>Second, you want to be praised for your generosity. </li></ul>
  • 28. Intentions <ul><li>A good intention can never turn something that is bad (the object) into something good. </li></ul><ul><li>Ex: Robbing a bank in order to help the poor. </li></ul>
  • 29. Intentions <ul><li>Good intentions can never justify choosing something that is by its nature wrong. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: cheating to get higher grades so you can get into a good college. </li></ul>
  • 30. Intentions <ul><li>Wanting to go to a good College is a worthy motive; however, cheating is a bad action. </li></ul><ul><li>A good intention cannot make something that is bad into something good. </li></ul><ul><li>The opposite is true. </li></ul>
  • 31. Intentions <ul><li>A bad intention can turn something that is good into something bad. </li></ul><ul><li>For instance: complementing someone just to get a letter of recommendation. </li></ul><ul><li>In this case, one is insincere and deceitful using a person to get something you want or need. </li></ul>
  • 32. Question? <ul><li>How would you feel if you discovered your friends are nice to you just to get something out of you? </li></ul>
  • 33. Circumstances <ul><li>Circumstances are the how, who, when, and where of an act. </li></ul><ul><li>It includes the act’s consequences. </li></ul><ul><li>Circumstances can lessen or increase our responsibility for an act. </li></ul>
  • 34. Circumstances <ul><li>Ignorance, fear, psychological, and social factors can lessen and in certain cases cancel out our responsibility for our actions. </li></ul>
  • 35. Summary <ul><li>For an act to be morally good and acceptable, the object, the intention, and the circumstances must all be good. </li></ul><ul><li>A person also has to have full knowledge of his or her actions. </li></ul><ul><li>And free consent of the will (permission to act in a certain way). </li></ul>The end

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