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Practical

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Practical Experiments as Input for Writing

Practical Experiments as Input for Writing

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  • 1. Practical Tasks as Writing Input Phil Cozens Petroleum Institute
  • 2.  
  • 3. What do you think?
    • Should students be allowed to use their L1 in an intensive language course setting?
  • 4. L1 or NO L1?
    • Targeted L2 input
      • Oral/written instructions
      • Oral concept checking
    • Selective L1 usage
      • Avoid ‘concept overload’
      • Encouraging focused communication
        • Creating real collaboration
      • Allowing for success
    • Specific L2 outcomes
  • 5. The Students
    • Very low TOEFL scores (350?)
    • Mixed abilities
      • Computing, maths and science
    • Weak learner independence
      • Collaboration
      • Problem solving
    • Weak Practical skills
      • Manual dexterity
  • 6. The Students
    • Answer-fixated
      • Impatient with process
    • 3 classes
      • 2 male (12 + 13)
        • Joint class for experiment session
      • 1 female (8)
    Ajman, 19th December, 2009
  • 7. Why experiments?
    • Experiential learning
      • Contextualized input
    • Schema building
      • Relevance to future requirements
        • Provide input for writing tasks
        • Appropriate format
      • Create transferable knowledge
        • Provide avenues to use own resources
      • Overcome perceived conceptions of ‘correct’ lesson format
  • 8. Why experiments?
    • Change of focus
      • Combined classes
      • Interchangeable groups
        • Collaborative learning
        • Team building
    • Provide ‘do-able’ challenges
      • Chance to succeed
        • Encourage problem-solving
        • Making own decisions
      • Competition
    Ajman, 19th December, 2009
  • 9. Reaction Times -Lesson overview
    • Introduction
    • Task completion
    • Data transfer
    • Class feedback
    • Class elicited/corrected report
    • Follow-up activities
      • Paper-based classroom task
      • On-line independent tasks
    Ajman, 19th December, 2009
  • 10. Reaction Times
    • Procedures
      • Follow simple oral/role-played instructions
      • Brainstorming in groups
      • Elicitation and peer correction
      • Review task
    • Outcomes
      • Observation and data collection
      • Utilize a mathematical concept through the L2
      • Collation and transfer of data
      • Familiarization with report format
      • Data interpretation
  • 11. Lesson format - general
    • Once weekly – 3 period session
      • Review / feedback previous session
        • Grammar/vocabulary tasks
        • Error correction
      • New task instructions
        • Group discussions
        • Concept checking
      • Complete task
      • Handwritten report
      • Online edit
  • 12. Benefits
    • Tangibles
      • Reports
      • Diagrams and tables
      • Full engagement with tasks
      • Contextualized vocabulary input
      • No attendance issues
      • Willingness to revisit tasks/edit
    • Intangibles
      • Confidence
        • Presentation of ideas
      • Social skills
        • co-operation
      • Social network
      • Learning styles
      • Tolerance of uncertainty
      • Tolerance of the unorthodox
  • 13. In their own words
    • The students
      • Ahmed
      • Khalid
      • Mufarrej
      • Omar
    • The questions
    • Format
    • Number of takes
  • 14.  
  • 15. And finally….
        • Try the ideas for yourself!

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