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C:\fakepath\wheat trade teams

  1. 1. Darrell Hanavan Executive Director Welcome to Colorado Wheat Country
  2. 2. Colorado Wheat Organizations CWAC A marketing order funded by a producer-approved assessment of two cents per bushel of wheat to fund education, research and promotion programs to increase the consumption and utilization of Colorado produced wheat. CAWG A voluntary membership association that lobbies on behalf of wheat growers at the state and national levels of government and provides special programs and benefits to dues paying members including workers’ compensation coverage and an informative newsletter. CWRF A non-profit corporation developed by CWAC to further educational and scientific programs related to wheat. Acquires ownership of new wheat varieties developed by CSU and collects royalties to provide additional funding support to wheat related research at CSU .
  3. 3. Organizational Structure <ul><li>CWAC provides management and administrative services to CAWG and CWRF </li></ul><ul><li>CAWG and CWRF reimburses CWAC for these services. </li></ul>CWAC CAWG CWRF
  4. 4. The Plains of Colorado Key Weather Characteristics <ul><li>Dry winters with an occasional wind-blown snow. Some very cold temperatures alternating with some surprisingly warm days. </li></ul><ul><li>Windy springs with highly changeable weather, an occasional blizzard, large temperature changes and an occasional gentle soaking rain or wet snow to help nurture the grasslands. </li></ul><ul><li>Low-humidity summers with hot days and comfortable nights -- The threat of big thunderstorms is always there, and the Plains see some of the most ferocious hail storms of the entire continent. </li></ul><ul><li>Pleasant falls -- often dry.  </li></ul><ul><li>Overall -- semi-arid with precipitation gradually increasing as you go eastward into Kansas and Nebraska -- dry winters, wetter springs and summer, highly changeable weather, often windy, and some occasional monstrous thunderstorms with damaging hail. </li></ul><ul><li>--provided by Nolan Doesken , Colorado Climate Center </li></ul>
  5. 5. Colorado Topography <ul><li>Rocky Mountains dominate Colorado </li></ul><ul><ul><li>54 peaks 14,000 ft (4,300 m) or higher, including Elbert, the highest in the Rockies at 14,433 ft (4,402 m), and Pikes Peak at 14,110 ft (4,301 m). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Mean average elevation of 6,800 ft (2,074 m) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nation's highest state. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Eastern third of Colorado is part of the central Great Plains, a high plateau that rises gradually to the foothills of the Rockies. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Topographical Map Denver 5,280 ft 1,609 m Arkansas River 3,350 ft 1,022 m
  7. 7. Population Per Square Mile About 5M people reside in Colorado Denver-Aurora-Broomfield Metropolitan over 2.5M
  8. 8. Average Annual Precipitation Legend in mm Legend in mm Under 254 254 to 381 381 to 508 508 to 635 635 to 762 762 to 889 889 to 1016 1016 to 1143 1143 to 1270 1270 to 1397 Above 1397
  9. 9. Colorado Grasslands Colorado eastern plains prairie grasslands
  10. 10. ALL Wheat: Production by County, 2008
  11. 11. Winter Wheat, Colorado, 1999-2008       Yield Per     Acres Acres Harvested Acre Production Year Planted Harvested (Bushels) (Bushels) 1999 2,600,000 2,400,000 43.0 103,200,000 2000 2,500,000 2,350,000 29.0 68,150,000 2001 2,350,000 2,000,000 33.0 66,000,000 2002 2,350,000 1,650,000 22.0 36,300,000 2003 2,600,000 2,200,000 35.0 77,000,000 2004 2,300,000 1,700,000 27.0 45,900,000 2005 2,550,000 2,200,000 24.0 52,800,000 2006 2,150,000 1,900,000 21.0 39,900,000 2007 2,500,000 2,350,000 39.0 91,650,000 2008 2,150,000 1,900,000 30.0 57,000,000 1999-08 (Avg.) 2,405,000 2,065,000 30.3 63,790,000 2009 (est.) 2,600,000 2,400,000  39.0  93,600,000 
  12. 12. Winter Wheat, Colorado, 1999-2008       Yield Per     Hectares Hectares Harvested Hectares Production Year Planted Harvested (Metric Tons) (Metric Tons) 1999 1,052,00 971,000 2.89 2,809,000 2000 1,012,000 951,000 1.95 1,855,000 2001 951,000 809,000 2.22 1,796,000 2002 951,000 668,000 1.48 988,000 2003 1,052,000 890,000 2.36 2,096,000 2004 931,000 688,000 1.82 1,249,000 2005 1,032,000 890,000 1.61 1,437,000 2006 870,000 769,000 1.41 1,086,000 2007 1,012,000 951,000 2.62 2,494,000 2008 870,000 769,000 2.01 1,551,000 1999-08 (Avg.) 973,000 836,000 2.07 1,736,000 2009 (est.) 1,052,000 971,000  2.62 2,547,000
  13. 13. Promotion: Domestic <ul><li>About 50% of U.S. wheat production is consumed domestically as food, feed or seed. </li></ul><ul><li>Domestic food use of wheat was 922 million bushels, (25 million mt) or 37% of total U.S. wheat production in the 2008-09 marketing year. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Promotion: Export Market Development <ul><li>50% of U.S. wheat production typically exported (41% in May 2008-09) </li></ul><ul><li>80% of Colorado wheat production typically exported </li></ul>
  15. 15. Promotion: Domestic <ul><li>Wheat Foods Council (WFC) </li></ul><ul><li>CWAC is a member of WFC. </li></ul><ul><li>Dedicated to increasing wheat and other grain foods consumption through nutrition information, education, research and promotional programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Consists of grain producers, millers, bakers, baking suppliers, life science companies and cereal, tortilla, and pasta manufacturers. </li></ul><ul><li>Develops sound nutritional, educational, and promotional programs that reach health, nutrition, and opinion leaders, media, school foodservice directors, retailers, and consumers. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Promotion: Export Market Development <ul><li>U.S. Wheat Associates (USWA) </li></ul><ul><li>International Grains Program (IGP) </li></ul><ul><li>Wheat Marketing Center (WMC) </li></ul><ul><li>Plains Grains (PGI) </li></ul>
  17. 17. Promotion: Export Market Development <ul><li>U.S. Wheat Associates (USWA) </li></ul><ul><li>CWAC is a full member state of USWA </li></ul><ul><li>Export development organization representing Colorado and U.S. wheat producers </li></ul><ul><li>USWA cooperates with USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service to create, expand and maintain overseas markets for U.S. wheat </li></ul>
  18. 18. Promotion: Export Market Development <ul><li>International Grains Program (IGP) </li></ul><ul><li>Market development activities to educate foreign leaders and government officials about U.S. wheat through technical-training and assistance programs in storage and handling, milling, marketing and processing. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Promotion: Export Market Development <ul><li>Wheat Marketing Center (WMC) </li></ul><ul><li>Maintains a viable laboratory with equipment and expertise to demonstrate to the world the functional end-use properties of Colorado wheats, which are exported from ports of the Pacific Northwest and the Gulf. </li></ul><ul><li>Provides educational opportunities for Colorado wheat producers and the general public to learn about wheat quality analyses and its relation to wheat prices and wheat markets; and </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes the utilization of Colorado and other wheats to international and domestic buyers. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Promotion: Export Market Development <ul><li>Plains Grains (PGI) </li></ul><ul><li>Collects, analyzes and compares Colorado wheat quality data that is summarized in an annual Colorado Wheat Quality Report that is provided to USWA and export customers. </li></ul>
  21. 21. <ul><li>Dues paying membership organization </li></ul><ul><li>Focuses on legislative issues affecting wheat producers at the state and national levels </li></ul><ul><li>Develops state and national resolutions at grassroots level to direct policy </li></ul><ul><li>Member of the National Association of Wheat Growers (NAWG) </li></ul>CAWG
  22. 22. Colorado Wheat Research Foundation (CWRF) <ul><li>CWRF is a non-profit corporation formed by CWAC to further educational and scientific programs related to wheat. </li></ul><ul><li>The CWRF board of directors is comprised of the executive committees of CWAC and the Colorado Association of Wheat Growers. </li></ul>
  23. 23. CWRF/CSU/CSGA Wheat Cultivar Program <ul><li>1995 (Renewed in 2001 & 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>CWRF is administrator of program; </li></ul><ul><li>CSU is the developer of new wheat varieties and wheat technology; and </li></ul><ul><li>CSGA is the wheat certification agent for Colorado and membership organization of seed growers. </li></ul>
  24. 24. Variety Ownership <ul><li>Agreement requires new varieties and wheat technology (patentable novel genes, germplasm, markers, traits, etc.) developed exclusively or cooperatively by CSU Agricultural Experiment Station to be offered to CWRF for exclusive acquisition and release. </li></ul><ul><li>When CWRF accepts a variety or wheat technology, it becomes the owner of all proprietary rights to it (all right, title and interest of CSU in Program Technology). </li></ul>
  25. 25. PVPA Protection <ul><li>CWRF applies for a Certificate of Plant Variety Protection under the federal Plant Variety Protection Act (PVPA) or a patent for each new variety or wheat technology obtained from CSU. </li></ul>
  26. 26. CWRF Varieties <ul><li>Halt (1995) – 16 participants (closed program) </li></ul><ul><li>Yumar (1997) – 25 participants (open program) </li></ul><ul><li>Prowers (1997) – (converted to Prowers 99) </li></ul><ul><li>Prowers 99 (1999) – 22 participants (open program) </li></ul><ul><li>Prairie Red (1998) – 34 participants (open program) </li></ul><ul><li>Avalanche (2001) – 15 participants (open program) </li></ul><ul><li>Above (2001) – 35 participants (open program) </li></ul><ul><li>Ankor (2002) – 18 participants (open program) </li></ul><ul><li>Hatcher (2004) – 33 participants (open program) </li></ul><ul><li>Bond CL (2004) – 25 participants (open program) </li></ul><ul><li>Ripper (2006) – 26 participants (open program) </li></ul><ul><li>Bill Brown (2007) – 19 participants (open program) </li></ul><ul><li>Thunder CL (2008) – (to be determined) </li></ul><ul><li>Snowmass (2009) – (to be determined) </li></ul><ul><li>(Currently there are a total of 41 Colorado participants in CWRF programs.) </li></ul>
  27. 27. Royalties <ul><li>One cent per pound on &quot;certified seed&quot; for at least two years; and </li></ul><ul><li>Not less one-half cent per pound on &quot;certified seed&quot; for life of the variety. </li></ul>(CWRF collects these royalties from the sale of &quot;certified seed&quot; by program participants). CWRF has adopted the following recommendations of CSGA regarding royalties for new program varieties:
  28. 28. Royalties for Research <ul><li>After deducting its actual expenses, CWRF pays the remaining funds to CSU </li></ul><ul><li>CSU uses a portion of the funds for general university purposes and pays royalties to the wheat inventors who developed the protected variety [under general CSU personnel policies] </li></ul><ul><li>Funds for program enhancement is earmarked for wheat breeding and other wheat-related research </li></ul>-------------------------------- Fiscal CSU Year Royalties -------------------------------- 1998-2007 804,522 2007-2008 253,987 2008-2009 332,461 2009-2010 323,254 Total $1,714,224 --------------------------------
  29. 29. Expanded Research <ul><li>The additional funding generated by this program complements funding already being provided to CSU by the Colorado legislature and the Colorado Wheat Administrative Committee (CWAC). </li></ul>
  30. 30. Royalties Leverage Research <ul><li>Innovative programs such as the CWRF/CSU/CSGA program provide more producer funding to leverage additional state and federal funding. </li></ul><ul><li>Each $1 of producer funding through CWAC for wheat-related research at CSU currently leverages an additional $14 in state and federal government spending. </li></ul>
  31. 31. Variety Development Cost <ul><li>A popular new variety can generate $25,000 to $150,000 annually from royalties a year or two after the release. </li></ul><ul><li>By contrast, it costs more than $500,000 to develop a new variety of wheat. </li></ul>
  32. 32. Public-Private Partnership <ul><li>In an era of budget balancing and budget cutting, both state and federal governments are demanding that benefactor industries (such as the wheat industry) also contribute or leverage funding - even though wheat producers pay state and federal taxes. </li></ul><ul><li>This is often referred to as a public-private partnership which is strongly encouraged by state and federal governments. </li></ul>
  33. 33. Program Benefits <ul><li>Wheat producers are assured of access to the newest developments in wheat-related research and to the new wheat varieties. </li></ul><ul><li>Wheat producers benefit from an adequate supply of certified seed which may result in higher yields, fewer weed seeds and preservation of distinctive characteristics of a particular wheat variety. </li></ul><ul><li>Seed growers benefit from the enforcement of protection of new wheat varieties under the PVPA which assures them that their efforts in producing the seed will be rewarded through their exclusive right to distribute seed of the protected varieties under arrangements with CWRF. </li></ul>
  34. 34. Biotechnology <ul><li>NAWG commissioned survey of support of biotech trait commercialization among wheat growers </li></ul><ul><li>Survey mailed in January and February 2009 to about 21,000 producers with more than 500 acres of wheat and 1,000 acres in total production </li></ul><ul><li>32% survey response rate </li></ul><ul><li>76% of U.S. wheat growers approve biotech petition </li></ul><ul><li>85% of Colorado wheat growers approve biotech petition </li></ul>
  35. 35. Joint Statement on Biotechnology <ul><li>U.S., Canada and Australia Wheat Producer Organizations Joint Statement on Biotechnology </li></ul><ul><li>Eight organizations representing wheat producers in the U.S., Canada and Australia will work toward the goal of synchronized commercialization of biotech traits in the wheat crop </li></ul><ul><li>statement highlights importance of: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>wheat to food supply </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>declining acres in all three countries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>slow growth trend of wheat yields compared to other crops </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>lack of public and private investment in wheat research worldwide </li></ul></ul>
  36. 36. Joint Statement on Biotechnology <ul><li>In the interest of expressing support for more efficient, sustainable and profitable production of wheat around the world, the undersigned organizations have approved the following joint statement concerning commercialization of biotechnology in wheat: </li></ul>
  37. 37. Joint Statement on Biotechnology <ul><li>Wheat is a vital food to all peoples of the world and we believe that by developing higher yielding better quality wheat varieties we can better supply the world with wheat food products. </li></ul>
  38. 38. Joint Statement on Biotechnology <ul><li>2. One important tool to help feed the world into the future is biotechnology. Basic agronomic improvements to wheat like strengthening disease and insect resistance, enhancing wheat's use of soil nutrients and water, increasing its tolerance to weather extremes like drought and frost, are all possible with biotechnology. Another critical area for biotechnology is to improve the nutritional aspects of wheat to facilitate healthier living for people all over the world. Biotechnology is not the only answer to these questions, but it will be a significant component in solutions. </li></ul>
  39. 39. Joint Statement on Biotechnology <ul><li>3. In many of our production areas, wheat production is under pressure from competing crops which, through the application of biotechnology, have achieved higher productivity, reduced input use, and other benefits not available in wheat. As a result, the historic area of wheat production has declined in many areas and economics are driving producers away from wheat and into other crops if they have alternatives. If wheat continues on a non-biotech course, then farmers will continue to devote a greater share of their acreage to biotech crops, where profitability is relatively greater, resulting in lower world wheat production than would otherwise be the case. </li></ul>
  40. 40. Joint Statement on Biotechnology <ul><li>4. In general, wheat yields are on a very slow growth trend in comparison with competing crops, and the longer it takes to increase the growth rate the bigger will be the hole from which the industry must climb. </li></ul>
  41. 41. Joint Statement on Biotechnology <ul><li>5. Biotechnology is a proven technique to deploy traits of interest with a high degree of precision in agricultural crops. Crops derived through biotechnology are subjected to strict regulatory scrutiny before commercialization. Over 10 years of global experience with biotechnology has demonstrated a convincing record of safety and environmental benefits as well as quality and productivity gains. </li></ul>
  42. 42. Joint Statement on Biotechnology <ul><li>6. Lack of private and public investment in wheat research has left wheat development behind the advances in competing commodity crops, and has also led to a shortage of scientific expertise in wheat research generally. By providing an opportunity for private companies, the level of activity in wheat research will expand and attract a new generation of scientists into the field. </li></ul>
  43. 43. Joint Statement on Biotechnology <ul><li>In light of these resolutions, we will work toward the goal of synchronized commercialization of biotech traits in our wheat crops. While none of us hold a veto over the actions of others, we believe it is in all of our best interests to introduce biotech wheat varieties in a coordinated fashion to minimize market disruptions and shorten the period of adjustment. We are also committed to working with other stakeholders to address their needs and concerns as we travel the road to commercialization. </li></ul>
  44. 44. Shared Interests <ul><li>Expand worldwide market of quality wheats </li></ul><ul><li>Develop drought resistant and heat tolerant varieties </li></ul><ul><li>Develop disease resistant wheat varieties </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborate on the development of dry land cropping systems </li></ul><ul><li>Increase collaborative efforts with farmers and researchers </li></ul>
  45. 45. Colorado Wheat: An Innovative Model Program Darrell L. Hanavan CWAC/CAWG/CWRF Executive Director
  46. 46. Wheat Research Partnership
  47. 47. Colorado Wheat Strategic Plan CWAC/CWRF/CAWG <ul><li>Research: Ensure a best-in-class wheat research program at Colorado State University to provide Colorado growers with the best varieties designed specifically for local conditions. </li></ul>
  48. 48. CWAC, CWRF & CAWG Invest in CSU Wheat Research <ul><li>The Colorado Wheat Administrative Committee (CWAC) is providing funding of approximately $391,736 to the wheat breeding program and wheat related research at Colorado State University (CSU) in the 2010-11 fiscal year (FY). </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CWAC is the Wheat Marketing Order whose purpose is to decide how the assessment funds are to be spent for research, promotion and education activities. </li></ul></ul>
  49. 49. CSU Research Funded by CWAC <ul><li>Wheat breeding – Hard red and hard white winter wheat breeding ($50,000) </li></ul><ul><li>Wheat breeding – Drought and high temperature stress tolerance research ($65,000) </li></ul><ul><li>Wheat breeding – Marker-assisted selection program ($50,060) </li></ul><ul><li>TILLING – Technology to Create Novel Traits for Wheat Breeding ($25,321) </li></ul><ul><li>Wheat breeding – Wheat quality improvement ($16,670) </li></ul><ul><li>Wheat breeding – Russian wheat aphid research associate ($16,670) </li></ul><ul><li>Crops testing program – Wheat variety testing ($6,500) </li></ul><ul><li>Northwest Colorado – Northwest Colorado winter wheat testing ($1,500) </li></ul><ul><li>Plant pathology – Wheat pathology research and extension ($17,860) </li></ul><ul><li>Weed science – Wheat weed science research ($25,000) </li></ul><ul><li>Foundation seed – Wheat foundation seed program ($12,000) </li></ul><ul><li>Entomology – Brown wheat mite research ($16,685) </li></ul><ul><li>Entomology – Russian wheat aphid research associate ($25,000) </li></ul><ul><li>Cancer prevention laboratory – Wheat crops for health research ($47,055) </li></ul>Base Funding $391,736
  50. 50. CWAC, CWRF & CAWG Invest in CSU Wheat Research <ul><li>The Colorado Wheat Research Foundation (CWRF) is providing additional funding of $323,254 to support the wheat breeding program and wheat related research at CSU in FY 2010-11. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CWRF acquires ownership of new varieties developed at CSU and collects royalties on the sale of certified seed. </li></ul></ul>
  51. 51. CWAC, CWRF & CAWG Invest in CSU Wheat Research <ul><li>The Colorado Association of Wheat Growers (CAWG) has been successful in leveraging substantial federal funding of approximately $250,000 annually for the wheat breeding program and wheat related research at CSU for new technologies that accelerate the identification and incorporation of useful genes into new varieties of wheat. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CAWG is a voluntary membership association that lobbies on behalf of wheat growers at the state and national levels of government and is a member state organization of the National Association of Wheat Growers (NAWG). </li></ul></ul>
  52. 52. CSU Wheat Improvement Team Scott Haley Brad Erker Ned Tisserat Frank Peairs Phil Westra Pat Byrne Nora Lapitan Henry Thompson Jerry Johnson Dan Anderson Randy Wilks Darrell Hanavan
  53. 53. CSU Wheat Improvement Team Purpose <ul><li>Enhance systematic communication between CSU research and extension personnel, CWAC, CWRF, and Colorado wheat producers; </li></ul><ul><li>Advise CWAC on important research and extension issues; </li></ul><ul><li>Establish wheat research and extension priorities; and </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate with Colorado wheat growers through CWAC concerning research activities and progress. </li></ul>
  54. 54. CWAC, CWRF & CAWG Invest in CSU Wheat Research <ul><li>The CSU wheat breeding and crop testing programs have a strong track record of responding to the needs and problems of Colorado wheat producers. </li></ul><ul><li>- 1 st Russian wheat aphid resistant wheat in U.S. (1995) </li></ul><ul><li>- 1 st Clearfield wheat in U.S. (2001) </li></ul><ul><li>It is a team effort by CWAC, CWRF and CAWG to invest in the wheat breeding program and wheat related research to ensure a best-in-class wheat research program at CSU to provide Colorado growers with the best varieties designed specifically for local conditions. </li></ul>
  55. 55. Programs of Research & Scholarly Excellence (PRSE) <ul><li>The Wheat Research, Outreach and Education Program was one of only seventeen programs selected as a CSU Program of Research & Scholarly Excellence for four years beginning in 2008. </li></ul><ul><li>PSRE was initiated in 1991 and programs are selected after an extensive nomination and review process that takes place every four year. </li></ul><ul><li>Programs are awarded this designation because they have achieve great distinction and set a standard for excellence that may serve as a model for programs throughout the institution. </li></ul>
  56. 56. CWRF Innovative Model for Commercializing Wheat Varieties <ul><li>CWRF/CSU/CSGA/CSURF Wheat Cultivar Program (began in 1995 and was renewed in 2001 & 2007). </li></ul><ul><li>CWRF is administrator of program; CSU is the developer of new wheat varieties and wheat technology; CSGA is the wheat certification agent for Colorado and membership organization of seed growers; and CSURF is CSU’s agent with respect to technology transfer. </li></ul><ul><li>CWRF is a non-profit corporation formed by CWAC to further educational and scientific programs related to wheat. The CWRF board of directors is comprised of the executive committees of CWAC and CAWG. </li></ul>
  57. 57. CWRF Innovative Model for Commercializing Wheat Varieties <ul><li>Agreement requires new varieties and wheat technology (patentable novel genes, germplasm, markers, traits, etc.) developed exclusively or cooperatively by CSU Agricultural Experiment Station to be offered to CWRF for exclusive acquisition and release. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When CWRF accepts a variety or wheat technology, it becomes the owner of all proprietary rights to it (all right, title and interest of CSU in Program Technology). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>CWRF applies for a Certificate of Plant Variety Protection under the federal Plant Variety Protection Act (PVPA) or a patent for each new variety or wheat technology obtained from CSU. </li></ul>
  58. 58. CWRF Innovative Model for Commercializing Wheat Varieties <ul><li>Since 1994 CWRF has taken ownership of fourteen (14) wheat varieties, including three (3) CLEARFIELD wheat varieties with a novel herbicide tolerance trait owned by BASF. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CSU developed and released the first CLEARFIELD wheat variety. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CWRF was the first to commercialize a CLEARFIELD wheat variety. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>There is a separate program for each new variety. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The eligibility requirements for seed grower participants include being a member in good standing of CSGA and signing a participant agreement with CWRF. (There are currently 41 Colorado seed grower participants in CWRF programs). </li></ul></ul>
  59. 59. CWRF Innovative Model for Commercializing Wheat Varieties <ul><li>CWRF collects these royalties from the sale of &quot;certified seed&quot; by program participants of one cent per pound on &quot;certified seed&quot; for at least two years and not less one-half cent per pound on &quot;certified seed&quot; for life of the variety. </li></ul><ul><li>CWRF returned royalty funding of $332,461 in FY 2008-09 and a total of $1,390,970 to CSU that is earmarked for wheat breeding and wheat related research. </li></ul><ul><li>CWRF also licenses and sells program varieties. Licensed Above, Bond CL, Hatcher, Ripper and Bill Brown to AGVantage IP, NuPride and WestBred into 10 states. Sold AP502CL to AgriPro and Protection to AGSECO. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Licensed Thunder CL and Snowmass to ConAgra Mills for the CWRF ConAgra Ultragrain Premium Program for Hard White Wheat. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  60. 60. Protection of Intellectual Property Rights <ul><li>CWRF applies for a Certificate of Plant Variety Protection under the federal Plant Variety Protection Act (PVPA) or a patent for each new variety or wheat technology obtained from CSU. </li></ul><ul><li>CWRF is a sponsor of the Farmers’ Yield Initiative (FYI) campaign that focuses on educating producers on the benefits of planting certified seed and informing producers of what constitutes illegal conduct. </li></ul><ul><li>A FYI 8-page full color brochure was sent to every Colorado winter wheat producer (> 8,000 producers) in Summer 2009 featuring facts about wheat research, the expected profit certified seed confers to growers and a warning for PVP violators. </li></ul>
  61. 61. Marketing Program <ul><li>CWRF initiated aggressive award winning marketing campaign* in 2007 using public relations firm Fleishman Hillard to increase seed sales and royalties. </li></ul><ul><li>2009 objectives were to increase market share of CWRF varieties by positioning Hatcher, Ripper and Bill Brown as a suite of varieties designed to help growers spread risk associated with unpredictable growing conditions and maintain producer confidence in the value of certified seed. </li></ul><ul><li>* 2007 Best of NAMA Award for Producer Funded Public Relations Program to Ag Audiences. </li></ul>
  62. 62. 2009 Marketing Program <ul><li>2009 Strategies </li></ul><ul><li>Educate non-users of certified seed about economic advantages of planting certified seed. </li></ul><ul><li>Leverage credibility of CSU scientists. </li></ul><ul><li>Position CWRF varieties as locally developed and tested for local conditions; and </li></ul><ul><li>Create “buzz” by reaching growers with same messages through multiple channels. </li></ul><ul><li>Direct mail campaign expanded and tailored to wheat producers in western Kansas and the Panhandle of Nebraska. </li></ul>
  63. 63. Planting Decision Meeting Postcard
  64. 64. Colorado CWRF Postcard #1
  65. 65. Colorado CWRF Postcard #1, p. 2
  66. 66. Colorado CWRF Postcard #2
  67. 67. Colorado CWRF Postcard #2, p. 2
  68. 68. Colorado CWRF Postcard #3
  69. 69. Colorado CWRF Postcard #3, p. 2
  70. 70. Colorado CWRF Brochure
  71. 71. HWW Postcard #1
  72. 72. HWW Postcard #2
  73. 73. HWW Postcard #3
  74. 74. Colorado Market Share (%)
  75. 75. Wheat Research Partnership
  76. 76. CWRF Hard White Wheat Marketing Program with ConAgra Darrell Hanavan Executive Director
  77. 77. CWRF Hard White Wheat Marketing Program with ConAgra <ul><li>CWRF ConAgra Mills Ultragrain Premium Program for hard white wheat gives Colorado growers a new opportunity to boost their incomes. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ultragrain is a 100% whole wheat flour that combines the nutrition and benefits of whole grains with the finished recipe qualities of refined flour. </li></ul></ul>
  78. 78. Contract Production <ul><li>ConAgra accepted up to 50,000 acres of Thunder CL beginning Fall 2009 and will accept 25,000 acres of Thunder CL and 50,000 acres of Snowmass Fall 2010. </li></ul><ul><li>ConAgra will accept up to 75,000 acres of Snowmass beginning Fall 2011 and up to 100,000 acres of Snowmass beginning Fall 2012.   </li></ul>
  79. 79. Grain Pricing Schedule <ul><li>ConAgra will pay a minimum premium of 30 ¢ per bu. for 2010 crop. </li></ul><ul><li>Plus a protein premium of 2 ¢ per bu. for each 1/5 greater than 12.0% to 15.0% maximum with an additional nickel per bu. at 13% protein (15 ¢ ) and another nickel per bu. at 13.5% protein (24 ¢ ) to a maximum of 40 ¢ per bu. at 15% protein. </li></ul><ul><li>Grower premiums and protein scales for 2011 and subsequent crops will be set by ConAgra at a later date; but, no later than August 15 th of the Fall wheat is to be planted. </li></ul>
  80. 80. Delivery Points <ul><li>ConAgra in collaboration with CWRF has established country elevator delivery points and/or a delivery program with country elevators. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Commerce City - ConAgra </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bennett – Roggen Farmers Elevator Association </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Anton – Anton Coop </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Haxtun – Grainland Coop </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Flagler – Flagler Coop </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vona – Tempel Grain </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Burlington – Corman Storage </li></ul></ul>
  81. 81. Thunder CL has Tolerance to Beyond <ul><li>First of two varieties developed by CSU accepted into the program. </li></ul><ul><li>Tolerance to Beyond herbicide for control of winter annual grasses like feral rye, downy brome, jointed goatgrass and cheatgrass. </li></ul><ul><li>CSU Uniform Variety Trials have shown: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>excellent straw strength and top irrigated yields </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>dryland yield comparable to popular Clearfield* varieties Above and Bond CL </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>good stress tolerance, high performance in tough weather conditions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>stripe and stem rust resistance, good wheat streak mosaic virus tolerance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>sprout tolerance better than Platte, less than Danby and Trego </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>exceptional milling and baking qualities </li></ul></ul>
  82. 82. Thunder CL Has Top Irrigated Yields <ul><li>Ranked fifth in the irrigated trials on a 3-year average yield in 2008-10. </li></ul><ul><li>Variety Bu./Acre </li></ul><ul><li>Jagalene 91.2 </li></ul><ul><li>TAM 111 89.6 </li></ul><ul><li>Bond CL 88.7 </li></ul><ul><li>Aspen 87.8 </li></ul><ul><li>Thunder CL 86.5 </li></ul><ul><li>Yuma 83.1 </li></ul><ul><li>TAM 112 81.4 </li></ul><ul><li>Bill Brown 81.1 </li></ul>
  83. 83. Snowmass <ul><li>Second variety accepted into the program. </li></ul><ul><li>CSU Uniform Variety Trials have shown: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>top dryland yields, comparable to the popular varieties Ripper and Hatcher </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>taller plant stature, about 2-3 inches taller than Hatcher and Ripper </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>good fall stand establishment, good test weight </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>excellent overall disease resistance package (stripe and stem rust, wheat streak mosaic) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>sprout tolerance better than Platte, similar to Trego, less than Danby </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exceptional dough mixing and baking quality characteristics </li></ul></ul>
  84. 84. Snowmass Has Top Dryland Yields <ul><li>Ranked third in the CSU dryland trials on a 3-year average yield in 2008-10 </li></ul><ul><li>Variety Bu./Acre </li></ul><ul><li>Settler CL 56.5 </li></ul><ul><li>Ripper 55.9 </li></ul><ul><li>Snowmass 55.8 </li></ul><ul><li>Winterhawk 55.1 </li></ul><ul><li>Bill Brown 54.8 </li></ul><ul><li>TAM 111 54.6 </li></ul><ul><li>Above 54.5 </li></ul><ul><li>Hatcher 54.4 </li></ul><ul><li>Bond CL 54.4 </li></ul>
  85. 85. Snowmass Has Top Dryland Yields <ul><li>Ranked third in CSU Collaborative On-Farm Tests (COFT) in 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Variety Bu./Acre </li></ul><ul><li>Bill Brown 56.0 </li></ul><ul><li>TAM 112 54.9 </li></ul><ul><li>Snowmass 54.7 </li></ul><ul><li>Winterhawk 52.5 </li></ul><ul><li>Ripper 52.1 </li></ul>
  86. 86. Where to Purchase Certified Seed? <ul><li>8 CWRF seed grower participants in Thunder CL program. </li></ul><ul><li>15 CWRF seed grower participants in Snowmass program. </li></ul>

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