302 unit4 converge_short

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This presentation covers content in Unit 4 of TECH 3020: Technology Systems in Societies, at Bowling Green State University

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  • EX: Volti mentions how advances in medical technology have dramatically lowered infant mortality rates, yet many continue to have large families based on the traditional expectations that many children will not survive infancy.
  • EX: Volti mentions how advances in medical technology have dramatically lowered infant mortality rates, yet many continue to have large families based on the traditional expectations that many children will not survive infancy.
  • EX: Volti mentions how advances in medical technology have dramatically lowered infant mortality rates, yet many continue to have large families based on the traditional expectations that many children will not survive infancy.
  • Unions? Prof associations? Why would guilds be concerned about maintaining the status quo? What are some modern-day examples?
  • These examples basically do not allow for substantially different cultural variations on use and/or procedures based on cultural differences. To run a steel mill or an airline, much of the same operational, service, and maintenance procedures must be followed regardless of culture. To either make or receive a cell phone call, you have to turn it on and use it basically the same way, regardless of culture. Imperialism: “ extending a nation's authority by territorial acquisition or by the establishment of economic and political hegemony over other nations.” dictionary.com
  • Of course, the “Borg” analogy is an exaggerated example.
  • Of course, the “Borg” analogy is an exaggerated example.
  • Of course, the “Borg” analogy is an exaggerated example. In terms of it not only being a West-to-East issue, think about the infusion of Japanese autos into the U.S. during the 1970s and 1980s. Even if Hondas and Toyota were better made and got better mileage than the unreliable Chrysler K cars and similarly unimpressive American autos available at the time, many were against buying foreign autos a matter of national pride.
  • This is of course goes back to the idea that the diffusion of any technology into a given society hinges on it being first adopted then adapted, as discussed in Unit 3.
  • 302 unit4 converge_short

    1. 1. <ul><li>Volti, Unit 4, chapters 16-18: Shaping and Controlling Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Technology and its Creators: Who’s in Charge of Whom? </li></ul><ul><li>Organizations and Technological Change </li></ul><ul><li>Governing Technology </li></ul>
    2. 2. <ul><li>Cultural Lag </li></ul><ul><li>“ Habits, thoughts, values, and social arrangements often fail to change at the same speed as technological innovation.” (273) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Often involves value judgments: Technological innovation = positive / progressive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cultural Lag = negative / backward </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>Cultural Lag, cont. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Countries with low Internet penetration or comparatively low access to information technology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Countries with poor telecommunications infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Countries with poor highways, etc. </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. <ul><li>Ex: Borat </li></ul><ul><li>Sasha Baron-Cohen </li></ul><ul><li>British comic </li></ul><ul><li>“ Borat” character, a journalist from Khazakhstan </li></ul><ul><li>Counted on cultural lag / value judgments </li></ul>© 2006, 20th Century Fox
    5. 5. <ul><li>Convergence Theory </li></ul><ul><li>“ Although the world’s nations have different histories and cultural orientations, they are becoming more similar to each other (that is, converging) as they make use of the same technologies.” (274) </li></ul><ul><li>Use of similar technologies typically leads to more similarities between cultures </li></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>Convergence Theory, cont. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Steel mill </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Airplane </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cell Phone </li></ul></ul><ul><li>“ Technological Imperialism”, “Cultural Imperialism”, “Lipstick Imperialism”, “Aping the West” </li></ul>
    7. 7. <ul><li>Benefits </li></ul><ul><li>Diffusion / mass production typically leads to lower prices (ex: cell phones) </li></ul><ul><li>Similar technologies can act as “connective tissue” for once-disparate countries / cultures: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Communicate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collaborate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Participate </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>Problems </li></ul><ul><li>Viral in nature </li></ul><ul><li>Can be perceived as cultural contamination </li></ul>© 1993, Paramount
    9. 9. <ul><li>Modernization </li></ul>
    10. 10. <ul><li>Westernization </li></ul>
    11. 11. <ul><li>Americanization </li></ul>
    12. 12. <ul><li>Unacceptable </li></ul><ul><li>influence </li></ul>
    13. 13. <ul><li>Assimilation </li></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>Example </li></ul><ul><li>2004 Arab Summit in Tunisia </li></ul><ul><li>Annual event focusing on issues impacting Middle East and states primarily Muslim </li></ul><ul><li>Cancelled initially, then postponed, due to differences “particularly over the issues of modernization…” </li></ul>
    15. 15. <ul><li>Problems, cont. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Usually assumes countries with relatively low technological levels will move toward a point already occupied by technological advanced countries.” (274) </li></ul><ul><li>Often, but not exclusively, West-to-East issue </li></ul>
    16. 16. <ul><li>More Anecdotal / Not Absolute </li></ul><ul><li>“ Throughout the Third World today can be found the apprehension that technologies developed in modern countries will result in the disruption of traditional social and cultural patterns.” (275) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Technological changes undoubtedly produce social changes, but at the same time technological change is itself a product of the society in which it takes place.” (270) </li></ul>

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