302 unit1 taxi-wga-ilwu
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

302 unit1 taxi-wga-ilwu

on

  • 887 views

This slidecast is for TECH 3020: Technology Systems in Societies, at Bowling Green State University.

This slidecast is for TECH 3020: Technology Systems in Societies, at Bowling Green State University.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
887
Views on SlideShare
830
Embed Views
57

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0

3 Embeds 57

https://elearning.bgsu.edu 43
http://www.slideshare.net 13
https://safefiles.instructure.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Technological change-to-social change example: highways & automobiles. Other examples? Good / evil examples: nuclear reactor technology can be used to generate electricity to light entire cities or power submarines, but can also be used to create nuclear warheads that can be launched from submarines to destroy cities.
  • These examples could also be used in the “winners / losers” bullet, from previous slide Technology does not yield its benefits without exacting a cost: Constant retraining [relevance by version numbers] NYC Taxi drivers / GPS (credit cards) WGA strike of 2008 Dockworker / longshoreman stand-off over PDAs
  • NYC Taxi Technology Enhancement Changes required before January 2008 13,000 taxis 44,000 drivers Credit card reader G.P.S./Passenger information monitor NYC Taxi Technology, cont. “ The new technology includes G.P.S. devices that track each vehicle’s location, automating the trip sheets that drivers have long kept by hand. The technology also allows for the city to send text messages to drivers, alerting them, for example, to property left in cabs and to traffic disruptions.” NYC Taxi Technology, cont. Convenience for passengers/drivers Credit card fees ≈ 5% loss New York Taxi Workers Alliance Fighting changes for 3 years Strike Sept. 5 and 6 About 8000 drivers Will this group make an impact? Show “Divided over tax tech” NYT video
  • Longshoremen, average pay: $106k Used clipboards for years PDA w/barcode scanners introduced, for efficiency Longshoreman balked, concerns over job loss Economy stalled for weeks Saturday, Oct. 05, 2002 A dockworker's job has long been dirty and dangerous, as memorialized in the Marlon Brando movie On the Waterfront. Workers have struggled against shipping magnates and corrupt union bosses alike to improve working conditions and push full-time wages up to an average of $106,000 a year. But in the proud history of the longshoremen, this is surely the first time ports have been shut down to preserve the right of a few hundred unionized shipping clerks to keep using pencils and clipboards instead of computers and electronic scanners. That, at least, is the view of the shipping companies and operatorsthat locked out their 10,500 dockworkers on the West Coast after accusing them of staging a slowdown to resist the introduction of much-needed new technologies. Within days, the $300 billion in cargo that each year surges through the 29 Pacific ports had come to a standstill. Some 160 ships loaded with everything from bananas to Nissan 350Zs began stacking up around the harbors of San Diego, Los Angeles, Oakland, Calif., Portland, Ore., and Seattle while idling truck drivers were loaded down with wine, apples and cotton#151;the perishable exports of U.S. farmers and companies needing to sell their goods around the world. While the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and port employers resumed contract talks with the help of a federal mediator, little progress was evident. The impasse was costing businesses an estimated $2 billion a day, and threatened an already slumping U.S. economy that depends more than ever on a just-in-time supply chain. The West Coast docks support an estimated 4 million jobs across the U.S. In Fremont, Calif., an auto assembly plant owned jointly by GM and Toyota had to stop production for lack of engines and transmissions, idling 5,100 workers. Such retailers as the Gap, Target and Wal-Mart, which expect to do 40% of their annual business during the holiday season, would suffer a blow to their profits from any long disruption in supplies of toys, apparel and appliances from the Far East. "Everything is backing up like plumbing," says Robin Lanier, executive director of the West Coast Waterfront Coalition, which represents retailers and manufacturers that depend on the ports. The coalition has called on President George W. Bush to use his authority under the Taft-Hartley Act to impose an 80-day cooling-off period. But as long as a mediator is meeting with both sides, Bush is unlikely to intervene. Though they serve as a gateway to the U.S. tech economy, some corners of the West Coast ports still operate as if they're stuck in the early 1900s, costing an estimated $1 billion in inefficiencies each year. Many clerks carry clipboards, tracking transactions with grease pencil and paper. When they use computers, they usually insist on re-entering all data themselves, even though it could easily be transmitted electronically from other ports. Modern ports in Rotterdam, Hong Kong and Singapore move three times as many trucks through their terminals every hour as their West Coast counterparts do. With West Coast cargo volume expected to double in the next decade, shipping companies and port operators want to deploy everything from bar-code scanners and smart cards to remote cameras and sophisticated tracking software. Truckers would no longer have to fill out long forms about what they're picking up or dropping off; they could instead slide an electronic card through a reader or use a radio-frequency-controlled fast pass and be immediately dispatched to the right location. More than the technology itself, the real issue, as with so many labor-management face-offs, is control. Management has promised to find new jobs at the same wages for 300 to 400 clerks who would be displaced by the new automated systems, but the union wants assurances that any newly created jobs will fall under its jurisdiction instead of being outsourced. "If the work changes," says union spokesman Steve Stallone, "we just want to ensure that we're the ones still doing the work." In today's hard times, though, the rest of the country mainly just wants to ensure that the work gets done.
  • Dockworker standoff, cont. “ Within days, the $300 billion in cargo that each year surges through the 29 Pacific ports had come to a standstill. Some 160 ships loaded with everything from bananas to Nissan 350Zs began stacking up around the harbors of San Diego, Los Angeles, Oakland, Calif., Portland, Ore., and Seattle.” Standstill cost est. $2 billion / day Good example of how technological Change takes place, or doesn’t, based on power of particular group, at particular time.
  • “ If the work changes,” says union spokesman Steve Stallone, “we just want to ensure that we're the ones still doing the work.”
  • The dockworker strike of 2002 was: A courageous struggle for longshoremen to hold onto their jobs A selfish attempt for overpaid workers to keep technological change at bay. Neither, or somewhere in between
  • Show “Why We Fight” & SNL videos
  • The WGA strike of 2007 was: A courageous struggle for writers to receive fair compensation A selfish attempt for writers to keep technological change at bay. Neither, or somewhere in between
  • What are some additional examples of a technological fix? (glasses, coats, cars, oven mitts, phones, etc.)

302 unit1 taxi-wga-ilwu Presentation Transcript

  • 1.
    • Volti, Unit 1 information, chapters 1-3
    • The Nature of Technology
    • Winners and Losers: The Differential Effects of Technological Change
    • The Sources of Technological Change
  • 2.
    • Technological change
      • inevitably produces social change.
      • does not affect everyone in the same way.
      • produces “winners” and “losers.”
      • can be used for either good or evil.
  • 3.
    • Technological change, cont.
      • does not yield benefits without exacting a cost.
      • may require changes in habits and attitudes.
      • often shaped by distribution of power. [change takes place--or doesn’t take place--because of a particular group]
      • is sometimes used to “fix” problems that are not technical in nature.
  • 4.
    • Technological change, cont.
      • demands “push” and “pull.”
      • treated differently in market economies than it is in centrally planned economies.
      • Requires forecasters to examine trends
  • 5.
    • Examples
  • 6.
    • NYC Taxi Strike, 2008
  • 7.  
  • 8. Dockworker standoff, cont. © 2002, New York Times
  • 9. August 29, 2007
  • 10. August 29, 2007
  • 11. HNRS 201 May 18, 2010
    • Resolved
      • PDAs / barcode scanners introduced, ports modernized
      • Efficiency increased, U.S. stayed somewhat competitive with Hong Kong, Singapore, etc.
      • Some dockworkers reassigned
      • Union - not management - retained control over jobs created by displaced dockworkers
      • Little to no outsourcing
  • 12. HNRS 201 May 18, 2010
  • 13. HNRS 201 May 18, 2010
  • 14.
    • Technological Fix
      • Technological solution to a non-technical problem
      • Can be effective, but sometimes value is limited: social problems are fundamentally different from technical problems.
      • Examples: airbags, scientific management
  • 15.
    • Tech. Fix for dockworkers
      • PDAs / barcode scanners introduced, ports modernized
      • Efficiency increased, U.S. stayed somewhat competitive with Hong Kong, Singapore, etc.
      • Some dockworkers reassigned
      • Union - not management - retained control over jobs created by displaced dockworkers
      • Little to no outsourcing