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Communist dilemma nuevo
 

Communist dilemma nuevo

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    Communist dilemma nuevo Communist dilemma nuevo Document Transcript

    • Communist and CapitalistDilemma 1The Communist and Capitalist Dilemma Pablo Cárdenas October 22, 2009
    • Communist and CapitalistDilemma 2 Abstract Communism and Capitalism are two different political ideologies. Cuba has adopted Communism andHonduras Capitalism. The Cuban government has granted free healthcare, education, and food, yet they do nothave several rights such as freedom of speech. Honduras, in the other hand, does give freedoms, but does notprovide anything needed to survive. Even though both countries depict an interesting opportunity, manypatterns have reflected that Cubans are migrating to Honduras looking for the prosperity that Cuba denied, aswell as Hondurans moving to Cuba in search for these privileges. How important are the three factors providedby Cuba? Is freedom really important when there is no healthy environment, adequate diet, or appropriateeducation? Can Hondurans really give up being free and enjoying of free enterprise? The Cuban governmentdoes exhibit a really interesting offer especially because the ascending prices of these necessities are constantlylimiting the life quality a family can have. Cuba makes a far better country than Honduras. Keywords: Communism, Capitalism, free healthcare, education, food, freedom.
    • Communist and CapitalistDilemma 3 Political doctrines have been forged through the years by the arousing needs of civilization that areconstantly changing. These institutions are set in order to keep stability and an appropriate development ofeconomical, social, and cultural aspects. A dogma that reached the most crucial point and most power in thetwentieth century was Communism. Cuba adopted the political affiliation under the Communist Party of Cuba,whose prime secretary is Fidel Castro. Since then, Cuban citizens have been granted free healthcare, education,and food (basic grains), but most of their rights, regarding to freedom of expression and action as well aschoosing the political leaders, have been limited. Another political ideology that had recently dominated thesystems in most countries of the world is Capitalism. This doctrine suggests liberated economic and socialactivities. A country that adopted a neo-capitalist government since the late 1980’s, after the last militaryregime turned in the power of the government, is Honduras. A dilemma has arouse when talking about thesetwo countries with different political systems because, according to the Democratic Cuban Director, manyHonduran have migrated to Cuba looking for prosperity as well as Cubans migrate to Honduras searching thesame goal("Grupohumanitario del," ). Why are people running away from their nation? Will people give upfreedom to have healthcare and free education? Why Cubans come to Honduras leaving all those privileges?Why will Honduran reject freedom? People, from both Honduras and Cuba, should better choose living in Cubarather than living in Honduras. According to the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, three primary needs that humans wouldtend to cover are health, education, and food ("Food, Nutrition, & Health," ). Cuban government has been ableto successfully create an optimum healthcare with great technologies available. In the Quality in Primary Care,Offredy and Maxine stated that the effectiveness of the system has become so great that medicines in UnitedStates that may cost up to $90 in Cuba they cost $3 (Offredy, & Maxine, 2008).Why is it so cheap? Cubanmedical systems have also contributed to the development of effective vaccines and other medicines. In anarticle written by Cuba IPV Study Collaborative Group the exceptional advances are exposed: In April 2007, the Cuba IPV Study Collaborative Group reported in the New England Journal of Medicine that inactivated (killed) poliovirus vaccine was effective in vaccinating children in tropical conditions. The Collaborative Group consisted of the Cuban Ministry of Public Helath, KouríInstitut,
    • Communist and CapitalistDilemma 4 U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, Pan American Health Organization, and the World Health Organization(Randal, 2007).Free and excellent education provided in the country is also attractive to new comers. Cuba has been able toestablish a governmental systemthat provides one of the best educations in the world(Gradson).The literacyrate, considered one of the highest, has increased to a 99.8% because the program set by Castro wassuccessfully accomplished(Quiroz). An article written by Wally and Barbara Smith addressed the efficacy ofthe program: They knew the literacy brigades were helping solidify Castro´s support among the peasantry, so the young volunteers were terrorized and at least one was murdered. But the campaign succeeded anyway. Practically overnight, Cuba´s literacy rate rose to 97% and it´s now a little higher than that. By the way, the average Cuban´s knowledge of the U.S. and of the world events is astonishing(Smith, & Smith, 2000).Social life is leveled in the amount of income and supplies they receive. Nova Gonzales talks about the systemin Overview of Cubas Food Rationing System: According to Nova González (2000a, p. 146), it has been estimated that, on average, the rationed market supplies around 61% of the calories, 65% of the vegetable proteins, 36% of the animal proteins, and 38% of the fats of the daily diet of the Cuban population. Two issues have to be pointed out here(Álvarez, 2006).Every month people are supplied with packages of basic grains such as rice, beans, corn meal, and flour.Everybody is able to eat food that allows survival. People have all these granted, their lives are almost assured.Would it worth giving up freedom? Milton Friedman says that freedom is a vital necessity that humans are always seeking (Friedman,1982). How important is freedom? Living in Honduras will grant that possibility. People in this country are freeto publish their ideas in public press when they reject a governmental decision. In Cuba when people reactagainst the government they end up being put in jail. An anonymous author wrote the following in InternationalAmnesty which was later published in the Havana Journal:
    • Communist and CapitalistDilemma 5 The increasing number of people jailed for peacefully exercising their rights to freedom of expression, clearly demonstrates the level to which the government will go in order to weaken the political opposition and suppress dissidents("Cuba: New wave," 2001).Free enterprise is another quality available in Honduras. Companies, which are private property, are able totrade, import, and export freely. An example of this is the Free Trade Agreement which allows Honduras tomove their products as pleased(Tratado de Libre, 1999). Cuba is not a participant of such commercial freedomespecially because it was expelled by the Organization of American States in February 1962 (Heguy, 2002).Can a human live with limited freedoms? Many people, especially Cubans, argue that freedom is the primaryright that must exist. However Honduras has encountered many negative aspects that can threaten such idealistic life andCuba feels requisites attractive to the population. On June 28, 2009 the President was victim of a coup(Sánchez, 2009). This political instability has caused the government to coerce those who are against(Girvan,2009). Cuba is also generating so much jobs that the unemployment rate is of 1,6% ("Cuba. The World”,2007)meanwhile in Honduras is of 27,8%("Honduras. The World," 2007).Larry Luxner published in the CubaNews an article placing Cuba in the 52ndin terms of life quality: This years report puts Cuba 52nd in terms of life expectancy, educational attainment and adjusted real income. Not bad, considering that Cuba scored higher than Trinidad and Tobago, Mexico, Bulgaria, Malaysia, Russia, Brazil, Venezuela, Saudi Arabia, Thailand and the Dominican Republic, to name a few(Luxner, 2003).Cuba exceeds the prosperity offered in Honduras reassuring the thesis statement that it would be better to live inCuba with no freedom than in Honduras with freedom. Would it be fantastic to have free healthcare, education, and food? Would people be able to tradefreedom for such privileges? As humans expect to survive in this world they might do such thing. In order forhumans to survive they must fulfill these needs. Living in Honduras would not grant you with free health,education, and food, you will rather have to work and if you are lucky enough, be able to succeed in acquiringeverything. So how important is freedom if you are not able to have all to survive? According to the theory of
    • Communist and CapitalistDilemma 6Natural Selection humans are always seeking for survival (Ghiselin, 2006). Then can you really give up freelyexpressing your ideas? Everything that people need is provided in the Cuban government that is why aHonduran or Cuban would have a better life in Cuba.
    • Communist and CapitalistDilemma 7Source(1999). Tratado de Libre Comercio Centroamérica. Retrieved from http://www.causa.sieca.org.gt/Cache/03010000037131/03010000037131.htm(2001). Cuba: New wave of political oppression - Amnesty International. Retrieved from http://asiapacific.amnesty.org/library/Index/ENGAMR250012001?open&of=ENG-CUBÁlvarez, J. (2006, january 12). Overview of Cubas Food Rationing System. Food and Resource Economics,(482 ), 134-156.Bernstein, E. (1969). Selected Works. Progress Publishers: Volume One, p. 81-97.Friedman, M. (1982).Capitalism and Freedom. Chicago: University Of Chicago Press.Gradson, F. (n.d.). EDUCACION EN CUBA. Retrieved from http://cubasocialista.com/educacionencuba1.htmGhiselin, C. (2006). On the Origin of Species: By Means of Natural Selection or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life [ON THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES]. New York: Dover Publications.Girvan, N. (2009). Honduras National Resistance Update-9/25: Real News Network Reports It All. THE HONDURAN RESISTANCE, Retrieved from http://hondurasoye.wordpress.com/2009/09/25/honduras-national-resistance-update-925-real-news- network-reports-it-all/Heguy, S. (2002, october 18). "La expulsión de Cuba de la OEA fue la instalación de la Guerra Fría en la región". Clarin, 31.Luxner, L. (2003). UNDP ranks Cuba 52nd in annual index measuring quality of life in 175 nations.. Cuba News, Retrieved from http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-840063_ITMMejía, L. (29, June 2009). Golpe de Estado en Honduras lleva a Roberto Micheletti a Presidencia. La Prensa, 2.(n.d.). Grupo humanitario del exilio cubano presenta plan de ayuda a pueblo hondureño | Directorio Democrático Cubano. Retrievedfromhttp://www.directorio.org/articulos/note.php?note_id=2563
    • Communist and CapitalistDilemma 8(n.d.).Food, Nutrition, & Health. Retrieved from http://www.csrees.usda.gov/nea/food/food.cfOffredy, J, & Maxine, F. (2008). The health of a nation: perspectives from Cubas national health system. Quality in Primary Care, 16(4), 269-277.Quiroz, M. (n.d.).A week in Cuba 2009. Retrieved from http://aweekincuba.blogspot.com/Randal, G. (2007).Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine in Cuba. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, 43(9), 587-592.Sánchez, O. (2009, July 1). Obama: Golpe de Estado en Honduras "no fue legal". La Prensa, 2-3.Smith, W, & Smith, B. (2000).Condition:Education. Bycicling Cuba, 65, 79.Turgot, J. (1759). Eloge de Vincent de Gournay. Mercure.(2007). Cuba.The World Factbook [online]. Retrieved January 01, 2009, from U.S. Central Intelligence Agency: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/(2007). Honduras.The World Factbook [online]. Retrieved October 16, 2008, fromU.S. Central Intelligence Agency: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/