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KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
KidSafe  - Parental Training Presentation
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KidSafe - Parental Training Presentation

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Parent’s Guide to Protecting Children and Teens from Online Risk

Parent’s Guide to Protecting Children and Teens from Online Risk

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  • 1. Protection from Online Predators
    Parent’s Guide to Protecting Children and Teens from Online Risk
  • 2. Overview
    Dangerous Areas
    Playing “In the Cloud”
    Online Predators
    The Kid Factor
    Predator Protection
    Create Your Emergency Plan
    Safe Haven
  • 3. Dangerous Areas
    Internet predators are anyone or anything online actively or passively disseminating objectionable or illegal material, preying on surfers, or facilitating these activities.
    7 out of 10 kids do not tell their parents or guardians about what they do online unless asked. (McAfee)
  • 4. Meet the People Online
    Online teens have multiple points of access – home AND school AND the library AND a friend’s house…
    9 of 10 Teens ages 12 to 17 use the internet
    9 of 10 Online teens have access at home
    7 of 10 Have internet access at school
    7 of 10 Go online from a friend’s or relative’s house
    5 of 10 Have gone online from a library
    1 of 10 Go online from other facilities
  • 5. How Surfers Get Online
  • 6. How Kids Get Online
    7 of 10 kids have Internet access from a home computer
    7 of 10 kids have Internet access from a portable laptop computer
    3 of 10 kids connect with the Internet using games
    3of 10 kids have smart phones allowing Internet access from anywhere
    9 of 10 teens have mobile phones for texting
  • 7. Meet the Online Predators
  • 8. Social Issues
    Self Injury 2%
    Cheating 2%
    Drugs 2%
    Peer Pressure
    3%
    Stress15%
    Top Ten Problems as
    Reported By Students
    Fighting
    4%
    These problems exist with or without the Internet
    Family Problems
    4%
    Bullying10%
    Depression8%
  • 9. Nothing New – Almost everything bad on the Internet has been around forever in some form.
    Social Filters – In the past, we could rely on social filters to point kids in the right direction.
    The Rules Have Changed – Technology magnifies the problem, touching millions of people instantly, everywhere, efficiently.
    Magnified By New Technology
  • 10. Traditional social problems are magnified by technology
    Massive - 250 million web sites worldwide.
    Accessible - 2 billion people worldwide with instant access to anything you put online
    Unbiased - Technology doesn’t care about content
    Portable - Kids don’t need computers at home to get online
    Advanced - Kids know technology and that parents can’t catch up
    Anonymous - Technology makes it easier to hide activity and identity
    Instant - All this information is readily available to online predators
    Efficient - Easier and faster for online predators to get to kids
    The Technology Magnifiers
  • 11. Playing in the Cloud
    What Happens in Cyberspace, Stays in Cyberspace … Forever
    Facebook’s ”Terms of Use” gives them the right to use, copy, publicly perform, publicly display, reformat, translate, excerpt and distribute User Content for any purpose.
  • 12. Some Basic Facts
    The Internet is a two way street. You can get information or give it. Once you give it, there’s no taking it back.
    Next, there is no such thing as age verification online. When required, give an age, any age, and you’ve satisfied the requirement.
    You can operate with almost complete anonymity.
    The U.S. Supreme Court refused to resurrect a law requiring Web sites containing "material harmful to minors" to restrict access based on age. (IDG News Service , 2009)
  • 13. Multiple e-Mail Accounts
  • 14. Online Predators
    There are three kinds of Online Predators lurking on the internet; attracters, attackers, and enablers.
    A male student in the US was facing felony charges for posing as a girl on Facebook and tricking 31 male classmates into sending him naked photos. (AP, 2009)
  • 15. Types of Online Predators
    Attracters lure kids to objectionable web sites, preying on their youthful curiosity.
    Attackers are outright predators out to do harm using any means possible.
    Enablers are legitimate Internet web sites offering services that are easily used to conduct questionable or illegal activity, specifically with kids.
    Predators going through Disney‘s Club Penguin were stealing children's virtual money and threatening to keep it unless they sent images of themselves. (Courier Mail of Australia, 2008)
  • 16. Attracters
    Adult Web Sites – Adult topics, phone sex, adult chat rooms. Nudity may be included, but not graphic sexual content.
    XXX Sites – Pornographic and graphic adult material.
    Gambling - Online gambling, bookmaking, sports betting, dog and horse race betting.
    Warez and Hacking Sites - Tools for hacking, cracking, attacking, or phreaking systems. Cracked software or has keygen for the software you are using for free.
    Drugs - Illegal online pharmacies, drugs, drug manufacturing, recreational drugs.
    Illegal Activities - How to modify weapons, bomb making, phishing, credit card fraud.
    Parents and guardians can be held responsible for what happens on the family computers even if they are not themselves engaged in illegal activity. (Childnet.com, 2008)
  • 17. Attracters - Adult and XXX
    4 of 10 kids admit to viewing porn, nearly half of whom say they didn’t want to see it.
    Adult content may only show suggestive material. XXX sites are pure pornography.
    There are web sites and even videos that teach kids how to get to blocked sites through something called proxies.
    Adult content websites are the single most significant security threat for Internet users, comprising 31% of dangerous websites.
    The average teen spends one hour and 40 minutes a week browsing sites for pornography. (MailOnline, 2009)
  • 18. Attracters - Gambling Sites
    2 of 10 kids visit gambling sites.
    Gambling studies show from 2 percent to 7 percent of young people experience a gambling addiction, compared to about 1 percent of adults.
    Online poker rooms have made it that much easier to gamble at all hours of the day.
    2 to 7 percent of kids have a serious gambling problem. Another ten to fourteen percent are at-risk for developing a serious gambling problem. (MSNBC, 2009)
  • 19. Attracters – Warez (wares) and Hacking
    3 in 10 kids have downloaded illegal music.
    Peer to peer (P2P) or person to person Warez sites allow users to share files (music, video, etc.) with one another.
    Warez is a dubious way of getting software that has been cracked or has key generators that give you illegal keys that open software.
    14 college students were sued for copyright infringement by the recording industry's trade association, which accused them of illegally downloading or sharing music files over the Internet.
  • 20. Attracters – Drugs Online
    2 in 10 teens abuse prescription medications to get high.
    No age verification required.
    Most sites require no prescription.
    A 2007 DEA report (US) that estimates only 11 percent of prescriptions filled by traditional pharmacies were for controlled substances compared to 80 percent filled by Internet pharmacies.
  • 21. Attracters – Illegal Activities
    Bomb making
    Hacking credit cards
    Hate sites
    Modifying weapons
    Phishing
    In Japan a 16-year-old boy was arrested on suspicion of trying to manufacture a bomb to blow up his classmates. He got tips from the Internet on how to make bombs. (Fox News, 2009)
  • 22. Attackers
    The most dangerous type of Cyber Sharks is attackers who aggressively pursue kids for the purpose of doing harm. They know the Internet and how to exploit the kids using it.
    Cyber Bullies - Create threatening messages or spread rumors about others online.
    Identity Thieves – Steal identities for an illegal purpose such as accessing bank accounts or opening up a credit card account.
    Sexual Predators – Pursue kids for the purpose of sex.
    According to the Enhancing Child Safety & Online Technologies report, those who do harassing online don't bother to hide their ages or intentions. They are upfront with potential victims.
  • 23. Attackers - Cyber Bullies
    4 of 10 kids have been bullied online. 5 in 10 admit typing mean or hateful things about classmates.
    Cyber bullying uses both the Internet and cell phones to threaten others, spread rumors, and even post images.
    The shield of anonymity the internet provides emboldens bad kids to prey on others.
    Passwords or other personal information is stolen and messages are sent from the victims email, posted on their personal web site, or added to their social networking site.
    Incessant Cyber Bullying has led too many to suicide.
    The Australian Clearinghouse for Youth Studies says that a main reason kids who have been harassed on-line don’t report it is the fear of losing their access to technology.
  • 24. Attackers - Identity Thieves
    3 of 100 kids are victims of identity theft
    The Internet is a great place for identity thieves to go after a kid’s information, especially younger children.
    Online Predators in chat rooms or on social networking sites know just what to say to get a kids’ confidence.
    Thieves even offer “cyber candy”, like cyber club points, to get the information they want.
    According to a Debix study, 5 of 100 kids have credit reports under their Social Security Number. 3 of 100 were victims of identity theft. (Cnet News, 2008)
  • 25. Attackers - Sexual Predators
    According to Pew/Internet, 3 of 10 online teens have been contacted by a complete stranger.
    Nearly 1 in 10 kids experienced disturbing stranger contact.
    Because the Internet puts personal information, communication tools, and kids at their fingertips, it creates the “perfect storm”.
    In the majority of cases referred to law enforcement, adult offenders are honest about being an adult, and in 79 percent of the cases, they are honest about their intentions to have sex with the youth.
    The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children reports that 1 in 7 kids online has been solicited or enticed. (National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, 2009)
  • 26. Enablers
    Enablers are those legitimate Internet web sites offering services that are easily used to conduct questionable or illegal activity, specifically with kids.
    Social Networking Sites - Web-based services that let users create a public profile and share it with other network users.
    Virtual Worlds - Combine aspects of social networking sites with a computer generated world that its users inhabit and interact with others using avatars.
    Chat Rooms - Extremely popular modes of Internet communication used by kids to start and nurture online relationships.
    Over the course of two years, MySpace kicked 90,000 known registered sex offenders off its web site. (New York Times, 2009)
  • 27. Enablers - Social Networking Sites
    More than 5 out of 10 teens use social networking sites.
    MySpace and Facebook are two of the most notable Social Networking Sites, especially for kids. But there are hundreds of others on the Internet.
    Prospective employers are asking for Facebook or MySpace pages as part of the interviewing process.
    Kids posting suggestive pictures may attract predators.
    A New York teenager has sued Facebook and some of its users because of a Facebook chat group where she says she was ridiculed and disgraced. (InformationWeek, 2009)
  • 28. Enablers – Virtual Worlds
    Virtual worlds combine aspects of social networking sites with a computer generated world that its users inhabit and interact with others using avatars.
    Avatars are graphic characters customized by users to depict their virtual self. Some are simple and others offer three dimensional characters that are lifelike in “every” way.
    Second Life is one of the most dangerous places on the web for kids and teens to explore their sexuality and dark sides. It’s also a great place for predators.
    Predators going through popular sites such as Disney's Club Penguin were stealing children's earned virtual money and threatening to keep it unless they sent images of themselves or engaged in some way. (Courier Mail of Australia, 2008)
  • 29. Enablers – Chat Rooms
    More than 5 out of 10 participate in chat rooms.
    A favorite place for sexual predators.
    A favorite place for police to conduct sting operations (To Catch a Predator).
    Conversations can get fairly explicit.
    Man arrested after posing as underage female in chat room.
    Tri-Lakes Tribune, March 2009
  • 30. Smart Kids Do Stupid Things - Sexting
    2 of 10 kids admit to sending nude or semi-nude pictures of themselves to others.
    Can be considered child pornography.
    Anyone underage and sexting is breaking the law and anyone convicted must register as a sex offender.
    Anyone who gets a nude picture from a minor is also subject to prosecution.
    And like everything else in the cyber world, these pictures may never go away.
    3 high school girls who sent seminude photos and 4 male students who received them were all hit with child pornography charges. (Chicago Tribune, 2009)
  • 31. Risk and Consequences
  • 32. The Kid Factor
    Too many people posing solutions for this problem divide kids into convenient little groups, typically by age. It’s the movie rating approach and it just doesn’t work for the Internet.
    A Microsoft Canada survey of kids age 9 to 17 says, "too many children and teens still engage in risky online behavior, such as posting personal information, accessing adult sexual material, and cyber bullying.” (Canwest News Service, 2009)
  • 33. Each Kid is Unique
  • 34. Each Kid is Unique
    Cyber Smart?
    Knowing the Internet and technology means knowing what’s possible and the answer is almost anything.
    They seek out like minded friends who share ideas, information, tricks and tips about things that can be done online.
    The more Cyber Smart your kid, the more susceptible they are to even greater online dangers.
    Cyber Savvy?
    Being street smart only online.
    Have a general awareness of the kinds of things that are happening online and within a cyber community.
  • 35. Internet Predator Protection
    “The only way to be certain that you won’t be attacked by an online predator is to stay off the internet”
    Unlike other Internet related problems like viruses, spamming, or spyware, there is no single defense that will protect all kids from all online predators.
  • 36. Protecting Your Kids
    Understand the Internet and Online Predators.
    Talk to your kids about their activity, the risk, and the consequences.
    Use appropriate technology to help with the problem like blocking access to bad sites.
    Trust but verify. Monitor your kids PC activity.
    Watch what’s happening on the internet. Know what’s happening outside of your virtual world.
  • 37. Create a List of Rules
    Don’t talk to or chat with cyber strangers.
    Don’t take cyber candy from a stranger.
    Don’t chat with adults.
    No sexting or posting of sexy pictures.
    Don’t pass along pictures you’ve received.
    Don’t give away or post personal information to anyone, ever.
    Parents get all passwords that kids use.
    No meetings with people met online.
    Tell parents any problems or suspicions.
    When in doubt, don’t do it.
  • 38. Technical Solutions – Parental Controls
    • Blocks bad websites.
    • 39. Reports on In Internet activity.
    • 40. Select filtering levels by user.
    • 41. Control access by time or time of day.
    • 42. Monitor text and chat messages from those not approved in advance.
    • 43. Monitor activity in your area.
    Doesn’t Let Kids Surf When You Aren’t Around
    There is no reason any kid should ever go to a Internet Predator website, accidently or on purpose. Parental Controls software blocks these sites.
  • 44. Create An Emergency Plan
    No matter what precautions you take, there is always the possibility of an internet predator attack. Should it happen, you need to know in advance what actions to take. Unfortunately most kids and parents do not.
    If you believe your child may have become a target of a sexual predator, or if you notice some or all of the signs identified above, you must take action.
  • 45. Checklist for Protecting Your Kids Online
    • Understand the Internet and online predators.
    • 46. Talk to your kids about their online activity, the risks, and the consequences.
    • 47. Use appropriate technology to help with the problem, such as blocking access to bad sites.
    • 48. Trust but verify. Monitor your kids‘ online activity.
    • 49. Watch what‘s happening on the internet. Know what‘s happening outside your own virtual world.
    • 50. Create an emergency response plan in case predator attack.
  • Emergency Plan
    Should any of the following situations arise in your household, via the Internet or on-line service, you should immediately contact the Gardai.
    • Your child or anyone in the household has received child pornography;
    • 51. Your child has been sexually solicited by someone who knows that your child is under 18 years of age;
    • 52. Your child has received sexually explicit images from someone that knows your child is under the age of 18.
  • Emergency Plan – Cyber Bullying
    Cyber bullying also requires decisive action. Should your kid become a victim of a bullying attack, consider the following actions:
    • Don’t respond to the cyber bullying.
    • 53. Save any pictures or messages as evidence.
    • 54. Report the incident to your kid’s school.
    • 55. Try to identify the persons responsible.
    • 56. Block the cyber bullies from future contact.
    • 57. Contact the bully’s parents.
    • 58. Report any incident of online harassment and physical threats to your local Garda and your Internet Service Provider (ISP).
  • Safer Surfing
    Talking with your kids about their internet activity and taking a few precautions greatly reduces the probability that they will be the victim of an online predator.
    “To minimisechances of an on-line exploiter victimising your child … utilise parental controls provided by your service provider and/or blocking software.” (Federal Bureau of Investigation)

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