Importance of Health Ministry (Parish Nursing)
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Importance of Health Ministry (Parish Nursing)

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This presentation explains the role of the healthcare practitioner in the church setting.

This presentation explains the role of the healthcare practitioner in the church setting.

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    Importance of Health Ministry (Parish Nursing) Importance of Health Ministry (Parish Nursing) Presentation Transcript

    • Health Ministry Anthony Wallace, CALA, ND P.C.D.I. Healthcare and Consultants of Texas L.L.C
    • Medical Terms
      • M.D – Medical Doctor
      • D.O - Doctor of Osteopathy
      • R.N – Registered Nurse
      • L.V.N – License Vocational Nurse
      • M.A. – Medical Assistant
      • C.N.A - Certified Nurse Assistant
      • D.D – Doctor of Divinity
      • Th.D – Doctor of Theology
      • M.H – Minister of Health
      • P.N.(C) – Certified Parish Nurse
      • L.M.(C) – Certified Layman
      • Parishioner - Congregation
      • Patient - A parishioner that has received or is receiving services.
      • Client - A parishioner that has not received services.
      • PA – Pastors assistant
      • Minister – servant
      • In attendance - On site
    • Philosophy of Parish Nursing
      • The philosophy of parish nursing is to provide a service with the general respect for the community with Christ sovereign love and care. – Dr. Anthony Wallace, ND
    • History of Parish Nursing
      • Parish nursing got its start in the 1800’s but nursing has been the oldest form of art since African slavery .
      • The nursing concept started with mostly women who were deaconess, pastors assistant, or ushers.
      • The main duties of the deaconess was to assist the pastor such as getting refreshments for the speaker, placing the speaker speeches on the podium, and making sure the pastors needs were meet.
      • Deaconess Nursing in the 1800’s to 1983 were only women that were a positive images of Godly women.
      • Most Deaconess were not married and were ordained by the church pastor or bishop as deaconess or Nuns.
    • History of Parish Nursing
      • In 1881, parish Nursing started officially in Chicago, IL at Lutheran General Hospital.
      • The hospital was mostly staffed by deaconess nurses trained at the hospital. In some denominations, Nuns were nurses for the orphans and the community.
      • In the 1800’s the nursing field was a career that was forced. Nursing was a female career path, you had to be 25 years of age and not married.
      • Most parents felt that if their daughter was not going to get married or have any children. She would have a choice to become a nurse.
      • By 1983, parish nursing was discovered and has been taught to many congregations and denominations.
    • Duties of The Parish Nurse
      • To ensure the health and wellness of the parishioners
      • To evaluate health programs set forth by the denomination and report the findings.
      • To oversee all volunteer staff that are conducting healthcare services on the premises.
      • To educate the community regarding health and wellness products and procedures.
      • To reinforce previous discharge education and explain to the parishioners previous doctors orders.
      • To promote patient independence and dignity through the health and wellness model.
      • To met the healthcare demands of the patient population of the church through preventive health (educations, health fairs, one on one counseling).
    • Duties of the Parish layman
      • May not counsel patients regarding medications
      • May take blood pressures and explain corrective measures
      • May perform blood sugar examinations.
      • May assist in medication (P.O., Topical, Optical, Ophthalmic)
      • Rectal meds and vaginal meds must be given with a licensed nurse in attendance.
      • The layman may not give injections including insulin unless delegated by the minister of health and it must be documented that the layman is proficient.
      • The layman may assist in medication reordering only if the license nurse is in attendance.
      • Layman may not handle any emergency alone unless directive have been written by the minister of health and only CPR or O2 may be administered by the layman.
    • Duties of the Layman
      • The layman may assist in procedures that are set forth by the deaconess nursing board if they carry a license such as an LVN or paramedic.
      • This definition in terms means that the state board has precedence over the parish nursing boards. If your state board says that some duties are to be conducts based upon your scope of practice you must have documentation in hand and it must be presented to the minister of health. To protect the church, the layman, and the minister of health from frivolous law suits.
      • The layman must have at least 7 CEU (continuing Education Units) yearly. To endure compliance with the board and proper nursing technique with parishioners.
    • Organization Chart
    • Position of Authority
      • Minister of Health –this is a position that is occupied by a licensed physician or nurse practitioner with an unrestricted license that can give prescriptive authority in case of emergencies on site. The minister of health must be approved by the denomination to administrate over several health programs. This position may be under the direction of the senior pastor.
      • Parish Nurse – This position is for a registered nurse that may assume director duties as the Minister of health according to the denomination board and the denominations needs. The parish nurse must have a unrestricted license to practice as a registered nurse and must have a bachelor of science in nursing. Associate degree nurses may fill in as a parish nurse but must show documentation of acceptance from the senior pastor.
      • Parish Layman – This is an assistant position to the parish nurse. This position may be occupied by a nursing assistant, medical assistant, or license vocational or practical nurse.
    • Benefits of Parish Nursing
      • The benefits of having a parish nurse are quite amazing . In fact, it may reduce your liability property insurance by having a nurse as a volunteer or paid staff.
      • The benefits to having a parish nurse are
      • Comfort during services for those that are in pain
      • The reinforcement of prescriptive orders for the doctors.
      • Education to keep the parishioners healthy.
      • Increase in church membership and attendance.
      • A positive network relationship with the neighborhood hospital
    • Parish Nursing Certification Classes
      • There are a few classes that are available for more information
      • Ridge wood United Methodist Church, www.parishnurses.org
      • College of Nursing Professions, www.health.usi.edu
      • Parish Nursing Commission, www.parishnursedallas.org
      • To sign up for the classes most require that an RN or pastor make written recommendation.
    • References
      • Laity service committee of Lutheran deaconess association, History of Deaconess and Parish Nursing, 1983
      • History of Nursing, www.gonursingschools.com, 2011