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SPED 5315 Transition

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  • Career and Technical Education is a the forefront for providing significant source of benefits to students with disabilities. You must be aware of rights of students, planning accommodations. Your Role includes helping promote social skills, build self-confidence, promote decision making. This starts at age 14, updated annually
  • Week 1 presentation1

    1. 1. Week 1<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Special Education 5315<br />
    2. 2. Special Education 5315<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Introductions<br />Class Overview<br />Syllabus<br />Textbook<br />Discussion<br />Cooperative Education Fact Sheet for Students with Special Needs<br />Transition<br />
    3. 3. Cooperative Education Fact Sheet Students with Special Needs<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />How does cooperative education help students with special needs?<br />Acquire skills they will need to be successful in the workplace or in a community living program;<br />Gain life skills in an environment suited to their unique needs and abilities;<br />Practice skills and apply knowledge acquired in the classroom in an authentic workplace environment;<br />Develop confidence, self-esteem and self-advocacy skills.<br />
    4. 4. Cooperative Education Fact Sheet Students with Special Education Needs<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />How do students with special education needs participate in cooperative education?<br />Students may be integrated into regular co-op program, with the provision of accommodations and support as stipulated in their IEP and transition plan;<br />A specialized co-op program may be designed for students with special needs. This type of program allows the cooperative education teacher to develop in-school classroom instruction and activities that are tailored to the specific needs of the students.<br />
    5. 5. Cooperative Education Fact Sheet Students with Special Education Needs<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Placement consideration<br />When arranging placements for students with special education needs, cooperative education teachers should:<br />Ensure that the physical environments of the placement facility is appropriate (e.g.,. Equipped with wheelchair ramps and accommodated washrooms);<br />Ensure that the placement can accommodate requirements identified in the student’s IEP (e.g. to provide assistive technology);<br />
    6. 6. Cooperative Education Fact Sheet Students with Special Education Needs<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Work with parents/guardians and/or students over the age of 18 to identify appropriate accommodations for a workplace setting;<br />Ensure the personnel at the placement site have been given proper instruction and preparation for working with and supporting a student with special education needs;<br />
    7. 7. Cooperative Education Fact Sheet Students with Special Education Needs<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Devise a “safety plan” for emergency situations in collaboration with the placement supervisor, the student, and the special education teacher (e.g. outlining an alternative to elevator use in a fire drill or actual fire in a multi-storey facility);<br />Ensure that appropriate health and safety training is provided at the placement site, and the the training is reviewed and updated to cover all new tasks assigned to the student during his or her time in the placement;<br />
    8. 8. Cooperative Education Fact Sheet Students with Special Education Needs<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Ensure that the task listed in the student’s Personalized Placement Learning Plan (PPLP) are appropriate for and consistent with the student’s IEP and transition plan.<br />
    9. 9. Cooperative Education Fact Sheet Students with Special Education Needs<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Programming considerations<br />Cooperative education teachers planning co-op programs for students with special education needs should:<br />Provide additional classroom time and assistance for students, if needed, to help them prepare for the workforce;<br />Incorporate opportunities to practice social and workplace skills into classroom activities;<br />
    10. 10. Typical Workplace Modifications<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Sign language interpretation<br />Alternatives to print formats such as Braille or voice activated software<br />Modification tools<br />Special designed computer software/hardware<br />Visual devices on emergency alarms<br />Meeting note taker<br />Wheel transportation or assisted travel to and from job placement<br />
    11. 11. Typical Workplace Modifications<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Amplification devices<br />Time of for medical appointments<br />Use of job coach<br />Daily-to-do-list or Task Analysis<br />Pictures/ charts/ graphics<br />Private work area<br />Extended time for competing tasks<br />Allow transition time<br />
    12. 12. Cooperative Education Fact Sheet Students with Special Education Needs<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Incorporate transportation training into pre-placement activities to prepare students for travel to and from their co-op placements;<br />Ensure that the student’s placement site has been arranged, in accordance with requirements identified in the student’s IEP and transition plan<br />
    13. 13. Cooperative Education Fact Sheet Students with Special Education Needs<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Resources<br />Health and safety:<br />www.passporttosafety.com<br />Special Deliver: Helpful Hints for students with Special Needs, parent/guardians, teachers and employers<br />Vocational Interest<br />http://www.careercruising.com/<br />
    14. 14. 9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Transition<br />
    15. 15. Transition<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />A coordinated set of activities for a student, designed within an outcome-oriented process, which promotes movement from school to post-school activities<br />-Laurent Clerc National Def Education Center, 1999<br />
    16. 16. Transition<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Flexible<br />Comprehensive<br />Coordinated planning process for the individual student, offering option and choices that are aimed at well-defined post-secondary goals.<br />-Kochhar-Bryant, Shaw, Izzo , 2009<br />
    17. 17. Transition<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />A program or service that promotes the student’s movement into employment, post-secondary education, or independent living.<br />- IDEA<br />
    18. 18. Transition<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Requires some restructuring of the curriculum, specifically in career development.<br />Requires participation of the student in the development of his/her statement of needed transition services. “such activities shall be based on the individual student’s needs, taking into account the student’s preference and interests.”<br />-IDEA, 1990). Sec 602<br />
    19. 19. Transition Services<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Postsecondary education<br />Vocational Training<br />Integrated employment (supported employment)<br />Continuing and adult education<br />Adult services<br />Independent living<br />Community participation<br />
    20. 20. Life Skills Mastery<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Include a wide range of knowledge and skill interactions believed to be essential for independent living<br />Managing Personal Finances<br />Selecting and Managing a household<br />Caring for personal needs<br />Safety Awareness<br />Raising and Preparing, and consuming food<br />Buying and caring for clothing<br />Exhibiting responsible citizenship<br />Using Recreational facilities and engaging in leisure activities<br />Getting around the community<br />Achieving self-awareness <br />
    21. 21. Brainstorming Activity<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />How would Cooperative Education help students with special needs?<br />Gives students a chance to choose and therefore be motivated & have a sense of self-determination and self-control.<br />Identifies possible strengths and aptitude towards skills that already exist in fundamental form and can be built upon easily or already applied.<br />Students can focus on what they like to do.<br />Students can be encouraged to try different things.<br />
    22. 22. Brainstorming Activity cont..<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Cooperative education helps students with special needs…<br />Identify their interest in a job/career, education as well as leisure.<br />Build skills to help them obtain jobs and more importantly, maintain jobs.<br />Learn life skills to become productive adults in their community.<br />Assist students to focus on their interest areas.<br />Allows students to gain work skills and apply to a job.<br />Purpose Skills<br />Direction<br />
    23. 23. Brainstorming Activity cont..<br />9/25/2011<br />Dr. P. Boyles, fall 2011<br />Teach expected “work” skills for future job & retention of job success.<br />

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