The Future of Libraries
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Keynote at the Gloucester County Library Staff Development Day, October 5, 2012

Keynote at the Gloucester County Library Staff Development Day, October 5, 2012

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  • Thank you for inviting me to join today for your staff development today I’d like to spend the time we have together talking with you about the important and challenging we do providing library service. Together, we’ll take a look at the work we do in libraries , and at the changing world around us and discuss what we see. [CLICK]
  • “ “ Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response . In our response lies our growth and our freedom.” - Viktor E. Frankl The world is changing Some would suggest that it’s changing at a faster pace than ever There are challenges, to be sure But there are also always choices As you take some time together to reflect, My job today is to help you hang out in that space. A little space for perspective. A little space for a shift in perspective. An opening to think creatively about the choices you have individually and collectively to focus your attention and your energy. Photo credit: Peter Bromberg [CLICK]
  • Specifically, We’ll cover: Pace of change Tech and Societal Trends Customer Engagement Value Look at some strategies for moving forward [CLICK]
  • I’d like to start by asking a question to create a little perspective; A little context WHY ARE WE HERE TODAY? A seemingly simple question, and one I try to continually ask and answer. Every day Take a moment, and think about the question. Why are we here today at the Maplewood Library? Why are YOU here? (RUN THROUGH ALL OF THE MAP SLIDES) [click]
  • Why are we here today? Because Life is short Our time together is precious I want to use my time here to make a difference I want to be awake and fully present Enrich my life and the lives of those around me. I choose to do that through library service.
  • But to come back to the question: Why are we here? The public library is a center of public happiness first, of public education next. -John Cotton Dana Ok, let’s talk about … [click] (change) Photo: http://www.npl.org/Pages/ProgramsExhibits/Exhibits/Dana06.html
  • Let’s start by talking about change.
  • Here is a chart that illustrates the pace of change– specifically change brought about by disruptive technologies You can see that the amount of time between disruptive technologies and major shifts that they bring about has continually compacted. (quickly review) This means that great grandfather’s life was virtually indistinguishable from his father’s life. They both lived in a make shift house , with a dirt floor, a wood burning oven, and no plumbing. The first 13 years of my grandfather’s life were the same as his fathers In 1921 he left Russia for America and the next 80 years of his life saw: Automobiles, Indoor plumbing, Telephones, Heart surgery, Air travel, Satellites in orbit Space travel a moon landing, Television, Microwaves, Portable radios and tape players In other words, my grandfather saw more significant change in his life than his ancestors saw in the 500 years previous. To contrast, my 15 year old nephew has never known a world without: Internet, 156 HD channels, Invisible braces, DVDs, Cell phones, Text Messaging The pace of change– the introduction of “disruptive technologies” continue to happen at an exponential pace… Here are just a few key indicators: [click]
  •   2000 2012 Use Internet (adult) 46% 82% Broadband at home 5% 66% Own a cell phone 50% 88% Wireless Internet 0% 66% eBook Reader 0% 19% Tablet 0% 19%
  • SHOW VIDEO ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Funny right, but he captures something there, about how customers expectations shift very quickly when they are exposed to new technologies that make their life easier—or at least technologies that they value. Back when we started QandANJ.org in late 2001 and I started going around doing presentations, I would ask, “how many of you have been on the internet in the last 24 hours.” In the beginning I’d see 10-25% of hands go up. Each year, I’d see more and more hands go up. And now when I ask that question (ask it) . I inevitably see 100% How many of you have texted w/I the last 24 hours? Been on a social network? In a few years, how many hands will we see? The fact is, that technology doesn’t just expand what’s possible, it shifts our expectations and the expectations of our customers. Which means we have to be continually evaluating and shifting our role as librarians to respond to the shifting needs and expectation of those that we serve . But we’re getting a little bit ahead of ourselves… Let’s finish this discussion on the pace of change [click]
  • Looking back at the chart: What we see is that for long periods of time, nothing happened. Then something happened, that had a major ramifications. That led to major changes. And then for another long period of time nothing happened. In Change Management, this was referred to as [CLICK] (Freeze,Unfreeze,Re-freeze model)
  • Up until recently, there was an accepted model of how change happens in society and organizations: The Freeze,Unfreeze,Re-freeze model , This model suggests that: Our structures, our organizations , and therefore our experiences remain fairly stable (or frozen) for long periods of time Some fundamental change occurs, and for a period of time, things unfreeze. We all get used to the change, it’s ramifications play out, and we settle into the new normal. We refreeze. This model makes sense when we apply it historically, but over the last 100 years, the periods between each change have gotten smaller and smaller, to the point where it seems we don’t even get to the refreeze point. With regard to change we are now more in a state of continual fluidity . What does it feel like when we are in “unfreeze” mode? [click]
  • Like this… Mad Men is all about that unfreezing Again, we have increasingly found ourselves in type of permanent unfreeze model Peter Vaill, a Professor of Mgmt at Antioch Univ . observed this phenomena and suggested a new model to help us understand change . [click]
  • We are now in what Peter Vaill and other change mgmt experts call: Permanent whitewater. Whitewater suggests a number of things: It suggests a fast-pace ; It suggests that the situation changes by the second It suggests that we need to vigilant, aware and responsive moment by moment It also suggests that we can have a general sense of shape of the river—the direction of current — Maybe know where the really big rocks are . We can’t control the ride, but we can influence it . So, what can we do to be successful in this new reality? [CLICK]
  • We can flatten our organizations. Why? Simple: Because flatter organizations – organizations with less heirarchy and bureacracy– are better positioned to succeed in a climate of rapid change? What are the characteristics of a flattened org? Agile Flexible Adaptable Innovative Responsive [click]
  • How does that look? Flatten the organization Strong shared Vision Less Hierarchy Bias for action Bias for risk-taking Employee empowerment to act Encourage Emergent Leadership [click] Photo cc license 2.0 courtesy flickr user Chrissy Eliza http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrissyeliza/4142314898/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • Emergent Leaders: (Peter Northouse) No formal authority Motivate others Initiate new ideas Seek others’ opinions Are passionate and involved Photo cc license 2.0 courtesy flickr user aussiegal http://www.flickr.com/photos/aussiegall/7196082472/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • Lindsey is a great example of Emergent Leadership [click]
  • Valve has NO hierarchy No management No structure Anyone can Think of it as runway fashion. It’s far out there, but some of those far out ideas can be scaled back and used. [click]
  • I mentioned the importance of Trendwatching Before getting into some specific trends I wanted to tip you off to two good trendwatching tools [click]
  • Trendwatching.com Great resource for societal trends Business trends Non-profit Free Monthly Newsletter Free Archives
  • Pew Internet & American Life Project One of seven projects that make up the Pew Research Center Nonprofit, nonpartisan “Fact Tank” Provides information on the issues, attitudes and trends shaping America and the world Produces reports exploring the impact of the internet on families, communities, work and home, daily life, education, health care, and civic and political life Authoritative source on the evolution of the internet through surveys that examine how Americans use the internet and how their activities affect their lives “ latest research” (gaming, location based services) and infographics [click]
  • Libraries are a featured topic: http://libraries.pewinternet.org/ Ebooks Reading Learning Libraries and Communities [click]
  • OK, let’s look at some of the current trends, starting with technology (Run through each and ask each of them what they think the ramifications might be) Mobile Smartphones Tablets and iPads Faster Everything Cloud Storage Rise of Apps Social In other words… [click]
  • OK, let’s look at some of the current trends, starting with technology (Run through each and ask each of them what they think the ramifications might be) Mobile Smartphones Tablets and iPads Faster Everything Cloud Storage Rise of Apps Social
  • Mobile devices have fundamentally changed the relationship between information, time and space. Information is now portable, participatory, and personal. PEW REPORT FROM Sept, 2012:   45% own a cell phone that is not a smartphone meaning that smartphone owners are now more prevalent within the overall population than owners of more basic mobile phones. [click]
  • As you know… (point out that these icons represent mobile services from GCLS) [cllick]
  • Vast majority of americans have a cell phone Smartphone ownership now outstrips cell phone ownership 9:8 margin [click]
  • Point: For the first time ever, the majority of memory chips are not used by pc’s “ What the post-PC era does mean is that personal computers are not at the center of the technology universe anymore” - Clifford Leimbach, HIS (a global information company) From: “Sign of the Times: PC Share of DRAM Market Dips Below 50 Percent for First Time”, September 14, 2012  Source: http://www.isuppli.com/Memory-and-Storage/News/Pages/Sign-of-the-Times-PC-Share-of-DRAM-Market-Dips-Below-50-Percent-for-First-Time.aspx
  • Cloud storage subscriptions up from 200 million last year Expected to jump 125 million this year Hit 1.3 billion in 2017. [click]
  • So… What does it mean if people no longer need a hard drive? They can work from anywhere. An opportunity for us to beef up wireless? Offer more work space? Circulate inexpensive devices [click]
  • Cross Platform, Multiple Devices Lots of cross-pollination among services and devices Much of it with Social component Content increasingly available on the phone – other devices Can be confusing as not everyone is playing nice together Amazon-Apple-Facebook-Google slugfest? Roku: Plays Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, HBOGo, games, Some real long tail stuff! (private channels, foreign, religious Hardware portal to content (through other providers) Amazon (selling video content—only available on one phone) Buy/lease content | Cloudplayer for music | Free storage Netflix: Now producing original content Need phone, Internet Ready Tv, roku or apple to stream Leased Content Apple TV : Can play netflix. Sell content through itunes. Competes with Amazon Buy content “Your content. On all your devices”. (Icloud) GoogleTV : Television, meet search engine Search engine for live TV, netflix, amazon, web Google Play/Drive Cloud storage | Media store (books, movies, music). Your Own content
  • More than 950 million active users [click]
  • More than 950 million active users [click] (Associated Press: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/number-active-users-facebook-over-years-214600186--finance.html)
  • More than half of all use is now mobile In Sept 2009, 65 million mobile, 300 Total users 3. In Sept 2012 540 million mobile/900 total users [click] SOURCE: http://money.cnn.com/2012/05/10/technology/facebook-mobile-users/index.htm (May 10, 2012)
  • 50% of our active users log on to Facebook in any given day
  • # People that use Facebook on their mobile devices are almost 50% more active on Facebook than non-mobile users. So what do you see as some of the ramifications and opportunities? Start a facebook page Post pictures Post events It’s not just a way for you to communicate with them, it’s a way for library users to see/hear and interact with EACH OTHER Build a community feeling. Demonstrate support. Give you a QUICK way to contact many people. [click]
  • Let’s look at some other societal trends (largely driven by technology) Convenience (anytime, anywhere) - OVER-RIDING TREND On Demand Choices Multiple Channels and Devices Hashtag Nation (Every few minutes, the blue Twitter bird would appear on the screen, along with a recommended hashtag ) Power of Place Create and Curate (Pinterest) 27% of teens record/upload videos (Pew’s Teens and Online Video, May 3, 2012 -- from 2011 data) [click]
  • It seems like 2012 has been the year of the ebook Conversations about Ebooks are dominating our conversations in journals, conference programs as the major stakeholders (libraries, authors, publishers, distributors) try to figure out what the new ebook reality will be and where do we fit in that picture. There’s a lot we just don’t know, but let’s start with what we do know. Let’s look at some data on ebook/tablet ownership. [click]
  • The share of adults in the United States who own tablet computers nearly doubled from 10% to 19% between mid-December and early January (up from 5 % in Nov 2010) and the same surge in growth also applied to e-book readers, which also jumped from 10% to 19% over the same time period. (up from 6% in Nov 2010) The number of Americans owning at least one of these digital reading devices jumped from 18% in December to 29% in January. [from: Tablet and E-book reader Ownership Nearly Double Over the Holiday Gift-Giving Period] Overdrive: ebooks up 200% in 2010. OverDrive 2011: library website traffic more than doubled to 1.6 billion page views visitor sessions also doubled to nearly 100 million Mobile device use increased to 22% of all checkouts 99.5 million visitor sessions, up 107% Ok, that’s what we know– ebook are here to stay and trending up quickly. What else do we know? [click]
  • It’s the Wild West! Good News: Reading’s not dead… David Carr, author/journalist was asked about the challenges facing newspapers and he responded that this is a Golden Age of Journalism. It’s only the newspaper Business model that is in trouble. Likewise, for those who love reading and the ability to share information and exchange ideas, it’s a Golden Age! As lovers of books, information, ideas, and learning there’s much for us to be happy about. Publishers are in trouble – they’re the middle man. But Libraries? We are the author’s natural ally (we’re not looking for a cut) Build and support the customer base We could even become a key player in a new distribution/marketing platform
  • Like the wild west, we have our Pioneers Library Renewal Gluejar: Authors and publishers choose a funding goal. Book lovers chip in to meet it. Anyone will be able to kick off a pledge drive for a favorite book on our upcoming web site unglue.it. Douglas County Library [click]
  • Douglas County Library “ The tables have turned,” said Sharon Nemechek, Douglas County Libraries collection services manager. “Publishers have heard about what we’re doing and they want to be part of it. We’re excited about the way the relationship between libraries and publishers is changing, and what it means for our patrons.” Douglas County Libraries and Gale Cengage Learning have entered into an agreement allowing for library purchase of Gale eBooks Other Partners The Colorado Independent Publishers Association (CIPA ) will sell ebooks to the library and the library will house the files on their own servers and be responsible for digital rights management. May 7 th Announcement of 5 new publishers Infobase, Gareth Stevens, Crabtree, Poisoned Pen, Book View Café DCL’s distribution model is attracting not just publishers, but libraries across the nation. Marmot Library Consortium on Colorado’s western slope and Anythink Libraries in Adams County will soon provide eContent hosted by DCL. Other library systems have shown interest as well, from regions including California, New England, New York and New Jersey, and the Colorado State Library has created  eVoke , an internet portal for libraries wishing to replicate DCL’s eBook model. Califa Group , will adopt the DCPL business model. Califa brokers services and products for  220 multi-type library systems  (1000 buildings), has seeded the project with about $30,000 and will purchase ebook files directly from publishers as well as an Adobe Content Server to manage the digital files. Numerous other libraries and organizations have inquired about the model, including Lyrasis, the North Carolina State Library, the South Carolina State Library, the Queens Public Library, the Tampa Bay Library Consortium, and others. [click]
  • "The library’s job is NOT to assure publishers and distributors that they shall endure no matter how heavy-handed their actions. The two entities that matter: writer, reader. Our job is to connect them. Are today’s epublishers making that easier, or harder? My radical proposal: let’s do more business with the former, and less with the latter." -Jamie LaRue, Director, DCPL [click]
  • Here’s one way to meet the challenge of ebooks Douglas County Library “Power Wall”
  • Here’s another possible response. I took this photo at Words bookstore in Asbury Park For the record, I don’t think this is strategy that is likely to pay off in the long term. Reminds me of a line from an Ani Di Franco song, “They keep banging their fists on reality, hoping it will break.” We move on…
  • Locally…NJLA provides sample letter http://savemynjlibrary.org/notenoughebooks
  • If more people are working from home and need short term space, where can libraries fit into this? We have the infrastructure (wireless) Are you seeing business people use the library as the office? What can you do to promote or build on this?
  • On Demand People’s expectations are shifted Have what they want when they want it. We need to be aware that “on demand” services change expectations Louie’s, “how quickly he feels entitled to something he knew existed 10 minutes ago.) Choice of Multiple devices TV Phone Computer Tablet Multiple channels Hulu, Netflix, Comcast, Open Web (google TV) Tell story of reading book at DMV Talk about HBOGo. Dropbox documents Google docs--- I pick up seamlessly where I left off. [click]
  • MAJOR OVERRIDING TREND: Convenience (anytime, anywhere) In one international survey by Datamonitor (Aug 2010) 44% of citizens across 15 countries feel that it is difficult to manage their daily obligations and find time to relax The attitude towards time that many now adopt is one that focuses on leisure time maximization and one where Solutions that facilitate additional time to do the things that are deemed most important is highly valued . The 2011 film “In Time” reflects a shared cultural sense that there literally is “not enough time” and gives artistic expression to the idea that time is increasingly perceived by us our most precious commodity. [click] (source:http://marketpublishers.com/report/consumers_goods/consumer_durables/global_consumer_trends_convenience.html)
  • Interesting to note: Not only is the desire for “Convenience” an increasing trend, it is also one of the core values of librarianship! Proposed in 1931 by S.R. Ranganathan [click]
  • So we’ve discussed Change Trends While it’s hard to predict specifically what’s coming, by paying attention to trends, and by encouraging and rewarding play and experimentation, we can make choices that will position us well for success. What other choices can we make? A choice to focus on ENGAGEMENT a focus on the customer experience . Not just Customer Service, But Customer Experience, soup to nuts [click]
  • One key to designing well for customer experience is practice of putting yourselves in their shoes. One way to do that Work Like a Patron Day: http://libsuccess.org/index.php?title=Work_Like_A_Patron_Day Physical, electronic walk throughs entering and leaving the library through the public entrance (not the staff doors) using the public computers to do your work using only the patron interface for searching your catalog using the library website to locate information using the public printers and photocopiers calling the main number and navigating the phone system using the public restrooms reserving public meeting rooms for meetings reading posted signs to see if they're helpful sitting in the chairs/use the furniture meant for the public paying your library fines (no waiving them the day before!) returning your items in the book drop following all library policies
  • In a talk that Jesse James Garrett did at UX Week 2009 (a user experience conference), he suggests that our goal should be engagement and that customers can be engaged in four primary ways. Through: Perception (senses) Action (body) Cognition (mind) Emotion (heart) [click] From. Jesse James Garrett | The State Of User Experience, http://vimeo.com/6952223 Picture of fingerpainting girl: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pollock/4172866434/sizes/n/in/photostream/ Picture of smiling woman: http://www.flickr.com/photos/phantom_menace/177058530/sizes/m/in/photostream/
  • What does that kind of engagement look like? Let’s See: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lXh2n0aPyw So how were the people in this video being engaged? Perception (sound, visual) Action (jumping, walking) Cognition (choices, cause/effect) Emotion (fun!) Garrett suggests that once you start thinking in terms of user experience, you start to see user experience problems everywhere; you can’t NOT see these problems. [click]
  • Let’s Review Garrett’s four main modes of engagement [click] Photo of fingerpainting girl: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pollock/4172866434/sizes/n/in/photostream/
  • What’s Missing? Identity – Who am I? Group Identity – Who am I in relation to you? Social Connections Community Connections OK, with these modes of engagement in mind, let’s look at some examples. Think about whether your seeing Physical Perceptual/sensual Cognitive Emotional Think about how ideas of social and communal identity come into play too [click]
  • Stuffed animals sleepover Anticipation Emotion (connection to animals) Social (family and friends look on web) Curiosity Excitement Action (come to the library) http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/sets/72157624716712838/
  • Stuffed animals sleepover Anticipation Emotion (connection to animals) Social (family and friends look on web) Curiosity Excitement Action (come to the library) http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/sets/72157624716712838/
  • Cake contest for gala (for the community, by the community) Invited local bakeries to submit Built anticipation Food (perception, action) Fun Perception|Action|Cognition|Emotion http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/sets/72157624859008020/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/sets/72157624859008020/
  • Maplewood library (all rights reserved) http://www.flickr.com/photos/39221032@N08/5659132634/sizes/z/in/set-72157626461516599/
  • Maplewood library (all rights reserved) http://www.flickr.com/photos/39221032@N08/5658528313/sizes/z/in/set-72157626461516599/
  • Comfort Intellectual Social Maplewood library (all rights reserved) http://www.flickr.com/photos/39221032@N08/5659107810/sizes/z/in/set-72157626461516599/
  • Maplewood library (all rights reserved) http://www.flickr.com/photos/39221032@N08/5659149200/sizes/l/in/set-72157626461516599/
  • Music (shared music) Maplewood library (all rights reserved) http://www.flickr.com/photos/39221032@N08/5659124408/sizes/z/in/set-72157626461516599/
  • Nine-year-old Danielle, of Mullica Hill, smiles as she cuddles with "Buttons," an 10-month-old therapy cat owned by Sharon Bednar, after reading to it during a PAWS for Reading session at the Mullica Hill Branch of the Gloucester County From: http://www.nj.com/gloucester-county/index.ssf/2012/07/paws_for_people_gets_first_the.html Staff Photo by Lori M. Nichols/Gloucester County Times
  • KENNY and Holly spends some quality reading time during the Paws for Reading Program. Photo by Susan Nierzwicki
  • Curiosity Comfort Color Maplewood library (all rights reserved) http://www.flickr.com/photos/39221032@N08/5659094616/sizes/z/in/set-72157626461516599/
  • Outside in the plaza… (Inside, outside, online) Author readings Bands Dancing http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/4988852680/sizes/z/in/set-72157624951884570/
  • More food! http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/sets/72157624542556483/
  • More food! http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/4866739194/sizes/z/in/set-72157624542556483/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/4866738458/in/set-72157624542556483/
  • More food! (do you see a pattern here??) http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/sets/72157624109335467/
  • Planting strawberry plants! — at Logan Township Branch of Gcls. From: GCLS Facebook page
  • More food! (do you see a pattern here??) http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/4682937925/sizes/z/in/set-72157624109335467/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/4754609655/sizes/z/in/set-72157624109335467/
  • Kids making Gingerbread Houses at a Library Craft Program for local children (at Swedesboro) http://www.swedesboro-nj.us/Library/index.htm
  • World cup http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/sets/72157624352026487/
  • World cup Community Social Emotion http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/4755242266/in/set-72157624352026487/
  • GCLS Cosplay “antiprom” From GCLS FAcebook page
  • Music/Battle of the bands http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/sets/72157624282314269/
  • Participatory Outdoors – visible to community All ages http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/4681798867/in/set-72157624282314269/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/4862869403/sizes/z/in/set-72157624282314269/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/4862857183/sizes/z/in/set-72157624282314269/
  • Maplewood Library Memorial Day parade. (all rights reserved) http://www.flickr.com/photos/39221032@N08/5787523057/sizes/z/in/set-72157626738900301/
  • Outside Communal Physical Artistic http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/sets/72157624074943211/ Bring your enthusiasm and your knitting, crocheting, and yarnwork projects. Learn to knit. Swap yarn, projects, and ideas. Let's knit and network! We'll be outdoors in the Community Plaza if the weather cooperates. If the weather doesn't cooperate, we'll be in the Princeton Public Library's first floor Community Room.
  • Outside Communal Physical Artistic http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/4730214965/sizes/m/in/set-72157624074943211/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/4730216611/in/set-72157624074943211/
  • Library as place Art Partnership with Princeton Arts Council http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/sets/72157624072659739/
  • Library as place Art Partner with Arts Council to curate. http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/4667082144/sizes/l/in/set-72157624072659739/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/4667082112/in/set-72157624072659739/
  • GCLS Quilt Exhibit From: GCLS Facebook page
  • GCLS Quilt Exhibit From: GCLS Facebook page
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/sets/72157594546924274/
  • Engage the intellect (and the community) http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/sets/72157623925359061/
  • Engage the intellect (and the community) http://www.flickr.com/photos/princetonpubliclibrary/4602154993/sizes/z/in/set-72157623925359061/
  • Allen County Public Library
  • Gaming! Every day there is a new article out on the benefits of gaming Stimulates many areas of the brain. Promotes learning Social, problem solving Musical! http://www.flickr.com/photos/shifted/2856581311/sizes/m/in/pool-38119641@N00/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/melancon/336855973/sizes/m/in/pool-38119641@N00/
  • Dance, Dance Revolution is great Recent article on the benefits of aerobic exercise (20 minutes) raises IQ. Better test scores. “studies from the University of Illinois found that “just 20 minutes of walking” before a test raised children’s scores, even if the children were otherwise unfit or overweight studies from the University of Illinois found that “just 20 minutes of walking” before a test raised children’s scores, even if the children were otherwise unfit or overweight “ ( http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/09/15/phys-ed-can-exercise-make-kids-smarter/ ) http://www.flickr.com/photos/aadl/3554598866/sizes/m/in/photostream/
  • Greenwich Township Branch of the Gloucester County Library System Olympic Games http://photos.nj.com/gloucester-photos/2012/08/greenwich_township_branch_of_t_11.html Staff Photo by Calista Condo/Gloucester County Times
  • Greenwich Township Branch of the Gloucester County Library System Olympic Games http://photos.nj.com/gloucester-photos/2012/08/greenwich_township_branch_of_t.html Staff Photo by Calista Condo/Gloucester County Times
  • Posted to GCLS Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/gloucestercountylibrary
  • Posted to GCLS Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/gloucestercountylibrary
  • Permanent Graffiti wall in Teen Space at Camden County (NJ) Library Interactive, dynamic environment (designed with lots of input from the kids) http://www.flickr.com/photos/sjrlc/4174043227/sizes/m/in/photostream/
  • GCLS Swedesboro Library Branch Teen Lock-In - August 3, 2012 - Duck Tape Crafts From GCLS facebook page
  • Merchandising (visual– thematic) http://www.flickr.com/photos/sjrlc/119907418/sizes/o/in/set-72057594093690342/
  • Gloucester County Library Logan Township Branch http://www.karmafoundation.org/njlibraries.html
  • Even Java and Visual Basic can be engaging… CC 2.0 Peter Bromberg (photo taken at Mount Laurel Library)
  • Lots of face out! Don’t want to spend money on art. Use picture books!!! Great art that you already have!! CC 2.0 Peter Bromberg (photo taken at Mount Laurel Library)
  • Lot of face out. CC 2.0 Peter Bromberg (photo taken at Mount Laurel Library)
  • Allen County Public Library Computer lab doesn’t have to boring!
  • Maplewood library (all rights reserved) http://www.flickr.com/photos/39221032@N08/5659098366/sizes/z/in/set-72157626461516599/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/sjrlc/119907439/sizes/m/in/set-72057594093690342/
  • Knit for others– engages our altruism (as well as physically, artistically, communally) COST: Nothing!
  • FOOD!!! CC 2.0 Peter Bromberg (photo taken at Mount Laurel Library)
  • DOESN’T HAVE BE EXPENSIVE!! http://www.flickr.com/photos/bgsulib67/5148527894/sizes/m/in/set-72157625192282865/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/bgsulib67/5147923795/sizes/m/in/set-72157625192282865/
  • Connecting people to each other Engagement doesn’t have to be expensive
  • http://library.bowdoin.edu/about-the-library/food-and-beverage-policy.shtml (Bowdoin Library) (ME)
  • How we need to realocate space. More collaborative space Increase in people working from home Fewer books on the floor. More computing (short term), Rethink collections – smaller, more varied(see bolan slides about power tools Flexible spaces Self-service In short More space for studying, working, programming, fewer rows and rows of books.
  • Social Media: This is a whole day in and of itself: Unprecedented opportunity to engage our customers How? We’re still figuring it out. But principles of user engagement are a useful guide. Be guided by: Perception (senses) Action (body) Cognition (mind) Emotion (heart) [click]
  • At the very least Social Media Presence : Have one. Market it Update regularly Be some combination of useful and interesting (credible, we got.) Respond to comments. Engage!
  • Offer Digital Content Also puts us in multiple streams (phone, laptop) 24/7 convenience
  • Digital Content
  • Digital Content: Audiobooks through one-click-digital
  • Digital Content: ebooks through Freading
  • You don’t have to be on every social media site But be on Facebook and stay aware of others Play, experiment It changes day by day.
  • OK, We’ve talked about Pace of Change Trends Engagement Now let’s talk about Value…
  • What I’ve heard from you and others that I’ve asked this question to is that you make your decisions based on some combination of: Quality Convenience Human Touch (personall) Environment Cost (time/money) And I also hear that that equation is different for all of us. Some of you get your oil changed because you have a coupon. Whatever’s cheapest. One librarian even told me that she uses a coupon at a place that her brother warned her has a rep for using bad, recycled oil… So it seems that while there are certain factors that create perceptions of value, “value” itself is not an inherent property in a product or service. Value is created in our minds and in the minds of our customers. [CLICK]
  • Research also suggests that when we make decisions based on what we value it’s much more about what we feel , then what we think. It’s emotional. We are not as rational as we think… John Kotter (Professor of Leadership at Harvard Business School), “People change what they do less because they are given analysis that shifts their thinking , than because they are shown a truth that influences their feelings ” Twenty-five years of neuroscience suggests that emotions are at the heart of our decision making. As neuroscientist Donald CALNE put it, “ The essential difference between emotion and reason is that emotion leads to action, while reason leads to conclusions” Therefore, when it comes to demonstrating value to our customers, stakeholders and funders… Statistics: gate counts, database usage stats etc, are only so useful in generating support for the library, because they don’t generate emotion. Stats can be a part of the larger picture of demonstrating value. But to really communicate value you need to appeal to emotions. Putting pictures, quotes, etc. on website. In newsletter, etc. Here are examples from VPL (make it about them) [CLICK]
  • If you remember nothing else though, remember that when communicating value, be User Centered So what do I mean by user centered? Whatever you offer: Frame it “What’s in it for them”. As Kathy Sierra points out in this cartoon, it’s the difference between trying to attract people because you kick ass, as opposed to attracting them because you help THEM kick ass. A subtle, but I think important difference in focus. How can you help them kick ass . Which is another way of saying, feel good about themselves Tom Asacker, branding expert, says it doesn’t matter what people think about you or your library ; what matters is how you make them feel about themselves in relation to what you have to offer . [CLICK]
  • Joan Frye Williams says, People ask themselves, “Is this my kind of place? Unless you get that right it doesn’t matter what else you do. – Joan Frye Williams Going back to Engagement Identity Group Community KH Story about being at the library on a Friday night and saying, “Has it come to this?” One great way to find out what people want is to-- ask them. [click]
  • Ask people what they want, but know that’s not the end of the story Henry ford said if he had asked people what they wanted, they would said “Faster Horses” Sometimes people don’t know what they want until it’s given to them (like wireless on an airplane) Who asked for atm’s and online billpay ? Who asked for self-checkout ? Who asked for IM ? Who asked for Ipods, or Iphones , or ipads, or Siri? I’ve experienced this in my job at SJRLC where I was responsible for offering a slate of workshops When I schedule classes, my biggest successes are with topics on the outer edge of their awareness ; topics that were never requested, not classes they’ve requested . In terms of value offerings, where should you start? [click]
  • Here’s what I see as the low hanging fruit By that I mean, here are the things you could be offering and promoting to your customers that take the least effort and return the biggest result in terms of their perception of you as offering something of value. Push Alerts Online Content Social Networks Programs Merchandising [MORE VALUE ON NEXT SLIDE] [CLICK]
  • Hospitality Kindness Caring Partnering Outreach [FUTURE PROOFING NEXT] [CLICK]
  • [click]
  • As physicist Niels Bohr said, “Prediction is very difficult… Especially if it’s about the future.” So how do you future proof [click]
  • We see that it’s hard to predict what’s coming, but by paying attention and valuing play and experimentation, we can respond rapidly and position ourselves for success. So how do you future proof? We’ve been talking about Structure your organization for success in a change-accelerated world Pay Close Attention to Trends Focus on Customer Engagement Focus on creating value for your customers and Community Here are some other ideas
  • We need to passionately extend ourselves OUT into the community. This means getting out into our communities. This might mean getting away from the reference desk ! Reference stats continue to go down and down we need to look at whether this is the best use of our staff and change staffing patterns accordingly. Do more “by appointment” Liaise with community groups. Go to meetings, sit on Boards. Don’t wait for them to come to you Go to them, listen for what they are doing, find ways the library can support them Information services, training, meeting, etc. See if there are partnership opportunities… (i.e. Princeton Futures) Facilitate connections among community groups by being more present in their spaces/meetings Discuss DCPL’s Community Reference project if there’s time
  • Proactively partner with members, orgs, agencies in your community. Why Partner? You may have noticed… it’s been a couple of tough years While usage is up (good thing!) OCLC’s “From Awareness to Funding” report (2008) reveals that People who use the library “just for fun” are our HEAVIEST USERS—AND LEAST LIKELY OF OUR ‘PROBABLY SUPPORTERS” TO SAY THEY WOULD DEFINITELY VOTE TO FUND THE LIBRARY. By partnering broadly across the community Theaters, Museums Restaurants Professors/teachers Hobbyists (knitters, scrapbookers, computer clubs) Community Clubs Business clubs and networking Organizations Business people and networking groups (linkedin) Writers and writing groups Artists You shift your perception and theirs--- from it being your library, to it being OUR library– a co-created entity that they will feel ownership of and love for. THAT translates into support.
  • Need to experiment and play Allow room for learning. Try things! If they don’t work out the way you expected ask why. Discuss, learning something, and try something new! But perhaps more importantly, they encourage experimentation and play in each other You don’t have to be an early adopter, but you do have to try things . Experience them.
  • Make something up. Anything. Be silly. Image: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationaalarchief/4193508328 (no copyright)
  • Example: Library Sleevefacing Bowling Green State University – Way to welcome new students and orient them to the library Take pictures in different parts of the library, then post them.
  • There has never been a better time in the history of humanity to steal The Rest
  • Steal the platform!
  • This speaks for itself Let go of perfection. …
  • We can’t control what’s going to happen We can control our choices We can continue to focus on our goals (new strat plat will be a great focuser) Assess the needs of our community today, tomorrow, and the next day Make choices, take action that move us forward Keep making choices. Keep trying new things. Keep talking to your community and getting their feedback, partnership, and involvement [click]
  • I’m optimistic. I see opportunity for libraries, and I sincerely believe that there has never been a more exciting time to work in this noble field. Not only are we needed, I believe that as the creation of and access to information explodes we are needed now more than ever . As our political discourse becomes more divisive, our communities need us more than ever– to be centers of civic engagement and common ground. The technologies and tools will change, but we will find new and creative ways of expressing and giving shape to our core values. We will continue to help people connect with the information they need.. Connect them with ideas, and with each other, strengthening our communities. We will continue to help our customers make meaning And We will continue to help empower them to enrich their lives and the lives of those around them. [click]
  • Thank you
  • Emergent Leaders: (Peter Northouse) No formal authority Motivate others Initiate new ideas Seek others’ opinions Are passionate and involved Photo cc license 2.0 courtesy flickr user aussiegal http://www.flickr.com/photos/aussiegall/7196082472/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • Picture by Lisa Coats “Another reason I love UNCW.” 4/25/12 An example of convenience—contrast with “No Skateboarding” signs Example of welcome. Of respect.
  • Two little footnotes I’d like to share. In 2006, Dale Holberg, the Editor in Chief of Britannica in a debate with wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales said: “ We want our articles to be correct before they are published. We stand behind our process, based on trained editors and fact-checkers, more than 4,000 experts, and sound writing. Our model works well. Wikipedia is very different, but nothing in their model suggests we should change what we do. “
  • Fast forward to 2009 , and this article in the Boston Globe, that appeared the same day as the articles announcing the death of Encarta… The new version of Britannica Online, set to debut this summer, will emulate the Wikipedia concept by letting subscribers make changes to any article , ranging from minor edits to near-total rewrites. "I don't believe it's accurate to say that Britannica & Wikipedia are becoming more similar” scoffed Britannica President Jorge Cauz OK, so Jorge is still a bit in denial , but kudos to Britannica for realizing they needed to change . I’m beginning with this story because it is a cautionary tale about The pace of change The power of disruptive technologies The danger of failing to accurately gauge the shifting sands of value as perceived by customer Our libraries are facing challenges that libraries did not face 20 years ago. These challenges have largely been brought about not just by change, but by the pace of change . [CLICK]
  • Peter Moville’s User Experience Honeycomb Facet’s of User Experience: (AKA VALUE) Useful Desirable Accessible Credible (A REAL LEVERAGE POINT FOR US) Findable Usable NEW ORDER Findability: It's first, to quote the inspiration of this post "you can't use what you can't find" Accessibility: Maybe a new quote, "you can't use what you can't access" Desirabiliy: You see the interface before you use it. Usability: You have to be able to use something to do something with it Credibility: You have to trust something before actually committing to solving a task with the service Usefulness: Usefulness is last, because a user forms an opinion about usefulness when he leaves, hopefully after completing his task. Value: value is the result of the user experience and not a facet of it.
  • Make “So What?” your favorite question… Cover image from http://openlibrary.org/works/OL8851068W/So_What So What   New & Selected Poems (With a Story) 1971-2005   Bilingual edition Published  September 2006  by  Copper Canyon Press  . 

The Future of Libraries Presentation Transcript

  • 1. The Future of Libraries http://www.flickr.com/photos/carbonnyc/3150765076/sizes/l/in/photostream/ Gloucester County Library Staff Development Day Oct 5, 2012 Peter Bromberg | peterbromberg@gmail.com
  • 2. “Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response.In our response lies our growth and our freedom.” - Viktor E. Frankl
  • 3. Change Trends Engagement Value Futureproofing
  • 4. But First… A little perspectiveWhy Are WeHere Today?
  • 5. Why Are We Here Today?
  • 6. Why Are We Here?The public library isa center of publichappiness first, ofpublic educationnext.-John Cotton Dana
  • 7. Change
  • 8. Exponential Pace of Change1.5 mill yrs lever, wedge500,000 yrs control of fire50,000 yrs bow & arrow5,000 years wheel and axle; sail500 years printing press with movable type; rifle100 years automobiles50 years satellites30 years IBM Home Computer25 years Windows / Mac20 years World wide web10 years ago iPod, Netflix, Tivo5-7 years ago Ubiquitous Broadband, Blogging, Skype4 years ago iPhone, Android, App Store, Geolocation< 4 years SMS/Smartphone ubiquity, Twitter, Facebook< 2 years Tablets, iPads, Cloud AMAZON-APPLE-GOOGLE-FACEBOOK
  • 9. Pace of Change  2000 2012Use Internet (adult) 46% 82%Broadband at home 5% 66%Own a cell phone 50% 88%Wireless Internet 0% 66%eBook Reader 0% 19%Tablet 0% 19% Stats from Pew Internet & American Life Project
  • 10. Change & Customer Expectations “Everything’s amazing and nobody’s happy” -Louis CK
  • 11. Exponential Pace of Change1.5 mill yrs lever, wedge500,000 yrs control of fire50,000 yrs bow & arrow5,000 years wheel and axle; sail500 years printing press with movable type; rifle100 years automobiles50 years satellites30 years IBM Home Computer25 years Windows / Mac20 years World wide web10 years ago iPod, Netflix, Tivo5-7 years ago ubiquitous Wireless, Blogs, Skype4 years ago iPhone, Facebook< 4 years SMS/Smartphone ubiquity, Twitter, Facebook< 2 years post PC world: Tablets, iPad, Cloud, AMAZON-APPLE-GOOGLE-FACEBOOK
  • 12. Unfreeze/Refreeze Change Model www.flickr.com/photos/circulating/3251962169
  • 13. This is what unfreeze feels like
  • 14. Permanent Whitewater http://www.flickr.com/photos/nukeit1/244167779/
  • 15. Flatten the OrganizationAgile Flexible Adaptable Innovative Responsive Photo cc license 2.0 courtesy flickr user Chrissy Eliza http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrissyeliza/4142314898/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • 16. Flatten the OrganizationShared VisionLess HierarchyBias for actionBias for risk-takingEmployee empowerment Photo cc license 2.0 courtesy flickr user Chrissy Eliza http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrissyeliza/4142314898/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • 17. Emergent Leaders- No formal authority- Motivate others- Initiate new ideas- Seek others’ opinions- Are passionate and involved Photo cc license 2.0 courtesy flickr user Ian’s Shutter Habit flickr.com/photos/9289838@N06/3387635009/sizes/z/in/photostream/
  • 18. Emergent Leaders“I’ll just keep goinguntil someone tellsme to dial it back.” And what will you do if someone tells you to dial it back? “I’ll still keep going”
  • 19. Flatten the Organization
  • 20. Trends
  • 21. Trends: Keeping UpTrendwatching.com
  • 22. Trends: Keeping UpPew Internet & American Life Project
  • 23. Trends: Keeping UpPew Internet & American Life Project http://libraries.pewinternet.org/
  • 24. Trends: Technology• Mobile• Smartphones• Tablets and iPads• Faster Everything• Cloud Storage• Rise of Apps• Social, Social, Social http://www.sharenator.com/The_Cell_Phone_Thread/68456/old_cellphone-37356.html
  • 25. Trends: Technology Post PC World• Mobile• Smartphones• Tablets and iPads• Faster Everything• Cloud Storage• Rise of Apps• Social, Social, Social http://www.sharenator.com/The_Cell_Phone_Thread/68456/old_cellphone-37356.html
  • 26. Trends: Technology“Mobile devices have fundamentally changed the relationship between information, time and space. Information is now portable, participatory, and personal.” Kristen Purcell, Ph.D., Associate Director, Research Pew Internet Project http://pewinternet.org/Presentations/2012/Mar/Radiodays-Europe.aspx
  • 27. Trends: Technology Mobile
  • 28. Trends: Mobile85% - Cell phone45% - Smart phone mber, 2012 ership Update: Septe ept-2012.aspx phone Own /2012/Smartphone-Update-S Pew Smart et.org/Reports tern http://pewin Photo courtesy flickr user fr3d.org CC.2.0 http://www.flickr.com/photos/fr3d/2661739196/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • 29. Trends: Tablets over PC“What the post-PC era does mean is that personal computers are not at the center of the technology universe anymore” - Clifford Leimbach, IHS Photo courtesy flickr user I_am_allan CC.2.0 http://www.flickr.com/photos/misteral/6896944190/sizes/h/in/photostream/
  • 30. Trends: Cheap Cloud Storage
  • 31. Trends: Cheap Cloud Storage
  • 32. Cross-Platform, Multiple Devices
  • 33. <FACEBOOK> Trend: Social </FACEBOOK>
  • 34. <FACEBOOK> Over 950 million active users </FACEBOOK>
  • 35. <FACEBOOK> Over 540 million MOBILE users </FACEBOOK>
  • 36. <FACEBOOK> 50% of active users log on to Facebook every day </FACEBOOK>
  • 37. <FACEBOOK> Mobile users are 50% more active than non-mobile users </FACEBOOK>
  • 38. Trends People and Service• CONVENIENCE (anytime, anywhere)• On Demand• Choice• Multiple Channels and Devices• #HashtagNation• Power of Place, Need for Space• Create and Curate (not just consume)
  • 39. Trend: eBooks
  • 40. Trend: eBooksFrom Pew’s “Tablet and E-book reader Ownership Nearly Double Over the Holiday Gift-Giving Period”
  • 41. Trend: eBooksIt’s the Wild West!
  • 42. Trend: eBooks Pioneers1.Douglas County Library2.Library Renewal3.GlueJar4.Queens Public Library5.Columbus Metropolitan
  • 43. Trend: eBooks“The tables have turned,” said SharonNemechek, Douglas County Librariescollection services manager.“Publishers have heard about whatwe’re doing and they want to be part ofit. We’re excited about the way therelationship between libraries andpublishers is changing, and what itmeans for our patrons.”
  • 44. "The library’s job is NOT to assurepublishers and distributors thatthey shall endure no matter howheavy-handed their actions. The twoentities that matter:writer, reader. Our job is to connectthem.Are today’s epublishers making thateasier, or harder? My radicalproposal: let’s do more business withthe former, and less with the latter." -Jamie LaRue, Director, DCPL
  • 45. Trend: eBooksIt’s fun, people aregoing to be drawnto it, you just want totouch it and see what’sgoing to happen. Accessiblefrom your computer fromhome, as well as from mobileapps and large touch screensin the library.–Deborah Margeson, Collection Services Manager
  • 46. Trend: eBooksPhoto by Peter Bromberg
  • 47. http://savemynjlibrary.org/notenoughebooks Trend: eBooksPhoto by Peter Bromberg
  • 48. Trend: Need for Space
  • 49. Trends: On Demand | Choice
  • 50. Trend: Convenience“Time is the new money” – Faith Popcorn
  • 51. Core Value! ConvenienceRanganathan’s Five Laws of Library Science 1.Books are for Use 2.Every reader his [or her] book 3.Every book its reader 4.Save the time of the reader 5.The library is a growing organism
  • 52. Engagement
  • 53. Focus on Customer Experience Walk Throughs http://rowleypolybird.blogspot.com/2010/04/preached-at-trinity-united-reform.html
  • 54. User Experience: Engagement Jesse James Garrett | The State Of User Experience, http://vimeo.com/6952223Perception (senses) External Action (body) External Cognition (mind) Internal Emotion (heart) Internal
  • 55. User Experience: Engagement
  • 56. How We Engage Senses Physical Intellectual Emotional
  • 57. Other aspects of Engagement• Identity – Who am I?• Group Identity – Who are we?• Social Connections• Community Connections
  • 58. How We Engage
  • 59. How We Engage
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  • 113. How We Engagehttp://www.flickr.com/photos/bgsulib67/5148527894/sizes/m/in/set-72157625192282865/http://www.flickr.com/photos/bgsulib67/5147923795/sizes/m/in/set-72157625192282865/
  • 114. How We Engage
  • 115. How We Engage
  • 116. How We Engage
  • 117. AwordaboutSpace
  • 118. How We EngageCC 2.0 John LeMasney http://365sketches.org/2010/03/17/86-of-365-are-9-of-my-favorite-technology-sets-in-inkscape/
  • 119. 5 Ways to Engage Our Customers Using Social Media• Be There• And there• Market• Update• Be Useful• Interact
  • 120. How do we engage our customers online?
  • 121. How do we engage our customers online?
  • 122. How do we engage our customers online?
  • 123. How do we engage our customers online?
  • 124. How do we engage our customers online?
  • 125. How do we engage our customers?YOU!
  • 126. Value
  • 127. Elements of Value Quality Convenience Human Touch Environment Cost (time or money)
  • 128. What is Value?Images from Vancouver Public Library: http://vpl.ca
  • 129. Communicating Value: User Centered http://headrush.typepad.com/creating_passionate_users/2007/04/index.htmlhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/radiorover/2787677403/
  • 130. Communicating Value: User CenteredPeople askthemselves, “Is thismy kind of place?Unless you get thatright it doesn’tmatter what else youdo.– Joan Frye Williams http://fineartamerica.com/images-medium/odd-man-out-michele-burgess.jpg
  • 131. Ask Customers what they want (but don’t stop there)Henry Ford said thatif he had askedpeople how theywanted to improvetheir transportationthey would have saidfaster horses. http://www.flickr.com/photos/danshouse/163331027/
  • 132. Value: The Low Hanging Fruit Push AlertsOnline ContentSocial Networks ProgramsMerchandising http://www.flickr.com/photos/pleeker/164453373/
  • 133. Value: The Low Hanging FruitHospitality Kindness CaringPartnering Outreach http://www.flickr.com/photos/pleeker/164453373/
  • 134. FutureProofing
  • 135. “Prediction is verydifficult, especially ifit’s about the future.” - Niels Bohr
  • 136. FutureProofing Change Trends CustomerEngagement Value
  • 137. Get out of the libraryCC 2.0: http://www.flickr.com/photos/markhillary/2212546989/sizes/m/in/photostream/
  • 138. Create Partnerships http://www.flickr.com/photos/lynstar/4903254802/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • 139. Experiment and play “I didn’t fail, I just discovered another way not to invent the electric light bulb.” - Thomas Edisonhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/zetson/3036254720/
  • 140. Make Something Up (and steal the rest)
  • 141. Make Something Uphttp://www.flickr.com/photos/bgsulib67/5148528014/sizes/m/in/set-72157625192282865/
  • 142. There has never been a better time in the history of humanity to STEAL THE REST • Webjunction • Social Media • Associations • ALADirect | ALAConnect • Consortia • Blogs • Literature • Facebook Groups • Personal Networks • LinkedIn Groups • Slideshare.net • Webinars • Vendors • Listservs/Forums
  • 143. Steal the Platform
  • 144. Let Go of Perfection http://www.flickr.com/photos/susansimon/4327971938/
  • 145. Experience is not what happens to you.It is what you do with whathappens to you. - Aldous Huxley www.flickr.com/photos/amandafrice/3046548439/
  • 146. The best time to plant a tree was always 20 years ago.The second best time is always today. www.flickr.com/photos/yahya/132963781
  • 147. http://www.flickr.com/photos/darwinbell/2602728681/Gloucester County LIbrary Staff Development Day Peter Bromberg | peterbromberg@gmail.com
  • 148. Deleted Scenes
  • 149. Emergent Leaders No formal authorityMotivate others Initiate new ideas Seek others’ opinionsAre passionate and involved Photo cc license 2.0 courtesy flickr user aussiegal http://www.flickr.com/photos/aussiegall/7196082472/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • 150. Customer Centered Design
  • 151. 2006 We want our articles to be correct before they are published. We stand behind our process, based on trained editors and fact checkers, more than 4,000 experts, and sound writing. Our model works well. Wikipedia is very different, but nothing in their model suggests we should change what we do.http://www.flickr.com/photos/radiorover/2787677403/ - Dale Holberg, the Editor in Chief of Britannica
  • 152. 2009 The new version of Britannica Online, set to debut this summer, will emulate the Wikipedia concept by letting subscribers make changes to any article, ranging from minor edits to near-total rewrites. "I dont believe its accurate to say that Britannica & Wikipedia are becoming more similar” scoffed Britannica President Jorge Cauzhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/radiorover/2787677403/ - Boston Globe, 3/31/2009
  • 153. User Experience Honeycomb VALUE • Useful • Desirable • Accessible • Credible • Findable • UsableBy Peter Morville, Semantic Studios http://semanticstudios.com/publications/semantics/000029.php
  • 154. Make “So What” Your Favorite Question http://openlibrary.org/works/OL8851068W/So_What