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Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills
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Using Podcasts to Integrate Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills

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TESOL 2010. SPLIS Interest Section

TESOL 2010. SPLIS Interest Section

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  • 1. Using Podcasts to Integrate Speaking, Listening, and Pronunciation Skills TESOL 2010 Patricia Watts, Lecturer Sue Ingels, PhD Candidate University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Thursday, March 25, 2010
  • 2. Outline <ul><li>Motivation for integrating skills </li></ul><ul><li>Podcasts: definition and rationale for use </li></ul><ul><li>How we use Podcasts in our class </li></ul><ul><li>How to use Podcasts to fit course objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Advice for using Podcasts effectively </li></ul><ul><li>Podcast sources </li></ul>
  • 3. Integrating Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills “ How you hear English is closely connected with how you speak English.” Gilbert, 1984, p. 3 Listening and speaking occur together in daily life. Natural interdependence useful for the development of oral proficiency (Murphy, 1991)
  • 4. Integrating Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation Skills Viewing pronunciation as part of the entire speech communication act (Morley 1994). Canale and Swain’s framework of competency (1980) led to a paradigm shift in pronunciation teaching from isolated focus on linguistic competence to focusing on all four competencies: linguistic, discourse, sociolinguistic, and strategic
  • 5. What is a podcast? Combination of two words: iPod (Apple’s digital music player) and Broadcasting “ Digital audio programs that can be subscribed to and downloaded by listeners” (Carvalho 2008)
  • 6. Why podcasts? <ul><li>Like other video & audio resources: </li></ul><ul><li>Provide meaningful language input for analysis and imitation </li></ul><ul><li>Raise learner awareness of language features and use </li></ul><ul><li>Learners can go at own pace </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers and students can create them </li></ul><ul><li>Authentic language (scripted and unscripted) </li></ul>
  • 7. Why podcasts? <ul><li>Unique advantages: </li></ul><ul><li>Easily accessed on internet </li></ul><ul><li>Once downloaded, can be used anywhere, anytime </li></ul><ul><li>Large and ever expanding topic selection </li></ul><ul><li>Free content, even to subscribers </li></ul><ul><li>Promote independent learning </li></ul><ul><li>Help develop a community of learners </li></ul>
  • 8. The Podcast Project <ul><li>Our context </li></ul><ul><li>Learner needs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vocabulary range </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Natural expressions – idiomatic speech </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Oral paraphrasing, summarizing, and quoting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Discussion and small talk skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rhythm </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Listening to fast speech </li></ul></ul>
  • 9. The Podcast Project <ul><li>What we did </li></ul><ul><ul><li>4 multi-part oral recording homework assignments over 8 weeks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Listen and summarize a podcast (done without viewing the transcript) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Various speaking tasks: create discussion questions for the topic, define terms or idiomatic expressions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Various pronunciation tasks: listen for and mimic rhythm enhancers, primary stress, intonation </li></ul></ul>
  • 10. Sample Lesson 1: Using Podcasts to reinforce skills <ul><li>Listen and take notes. (no transcript yet) </li></ul><ul><li>Summarize the main points of the podcast (1 min.) </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare 2 or 3 related discussion questions for small group activity. </li></ul>
  • 11. Sample Lesson 2: Dual Listening-Pronunciation focus <ul><li>Listen to segment 22 – 44 and follow along with the transcript. </li></ul><ul><li>Listen for the speaker’s use of fast-speech phenomena, such as contracted speech, reduced vowels, and linking. </li></ul><ul><li>Practice mimicking the fast-speech phenomena and record it. </li></ul>
  • 12. Sample Lesson 3: Incorporate a quotation in an oral presentation <ul><li>Listen to segment. Mark message unit boundaries and intonation. </li></ul><ul><li>Mimic the segment to the best of your ability and record it. </li></ul><ul><li>Create a similar sentence introducing a person, that person’s title or job, and a brief quotation. </li></ul>
  • 13. Audio Source <ul><li>Source: http://www.engineerguy.com/comm/4680.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Segment :59 – 1: 10 </li></ul><ul><li>“ August Dvorak, a professor of educational psychology, redesigned the keyboard using the then current notions of time-motion studies. A true believer in a purely scientific approach to life he urged his pupils to, quote, ‘Make yourself efficient and up-to-date, whenever possible, by the use of available machines.’” </li></ul>
  • 14. Sample student performance Imitation of original recording New Quotations created by Ss During my freshman year of undergraduate study, my professor, Su-Han Lu, told us, quote, “A civil engineer who stays in his office all days long cannot be a good engineer.”
  • 15. Other Uses of Podcasts <ul><li>Match podcast to teaching objective </li></ul>
  • 16. Discourse Structure <ul><li>“ Hello. I’m Dr. Jeff Henriques. And this is PsychOut, where we explore psychology outside of the classroom. And our topic is dreams. Why do we dream? When do we dream? Well let’s start with the second question first. It’s a little bit easier, a little bit shorter answer.” </li></ul><ul><li>What does the speaker say and do with his voice to signal topic and focus? Compare phrase length differences in spoken and written text. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: Henriques, J. (2009). PsychOut: Dreams. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Psychology. Downloaded through iTunes U. </li></ul>
  • 17. Listening and Speaking <ul><li>“ Ultimately, the storm of blather surrounding recent weather events can largely be blamed on a fundamental misunderstanding. Weather is the day-to-day temperature, humidity and precipitation. Climate is the overall combination of all these events over a long period of time. No single weather event—heat wave, hurricane or blizzard—tells us much about climate.”   </li></ul><ul><li>Listen for definitions of key terms. Record your oral summary of the podcast. </li></ul><ul><li>Source: http:// www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode.cfm?id =what-does-winter-weather-reveal-abo-10-02-11 </li></ul>
  • 18. Pronunciation Targets <ul><li>“ Congress passed this just a few months in to the new Obama administration. A few of the new rules took affect last year but major provisions are being phased in on Monday .” (heavy stresses, rhythm facilitators: linking, blending, CCS, reduction) </li></ul><ul><li>Source: http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=123909483 Downloaded on March 8, 2010. Copyright ©2010 National Public Radio®. Heard on Weekend Edition Sunday, February 21, 2010. </li></ul>
  • 19. Content-Based Instruction <ul><li>Identify podcasts that relate to class topic: e.g., HS history class. </li></ul><ul><li>Individually or as team projects, students listen to teacher-selected podcasts and find others from varying perspectives. </li></ul><ul><li>Outcomes: oral presentations, creation of new podcasts, written projects, group work, online discussion via class website </li></ul>
  • 20. Criteria for Selecting Podcasts <ul><li>Contains salient examples of target features </li></ul><ul><li>Speech authenticity matches assignment focus </li></ul><ul><li>Contains relevant content </li></ul><ul><li>Appropriate rate of speech </li></ul><ul><li>Varied speakers </li></ul><ul><li>Transcripts provided </li></ul>
  • 21. Tips <ul><li>Teacher and student need to be familiar with podcast technology; have internet access or a way to access podcast files </li></ul><ul><li>Use “adjust tempo” in Audacity </li></ul><ul><li>Transcripts may have discrepancies with the audio </li></ul><ul><li>Assemble and/or create a bank of podcasts </li></ul><ul><li>Have Ss make podcasts that can be used in future classes (will need their permission) </li></ul><ul><li>Create your own podcasts to match your teaching context </li></ul><ul><li>Use shorter podcasts for lower proficiencies </li></ul><ul><li>Have Ss identify podcasts that interest them—that will assist them in completing course assignments </li></ul>
  • 22. Podcast Sources <ul><li>Scientific American 1-minute Podcasts (with transcripts) </li></ul><ul><li>http:// www.sciam.com /podcast/ </li></ul><ul><li>“ Tune in every weekday for quick reports and commentaries on the world of science-- it’ll just take a minute.” </li></ul><ul><li>Bill Hammack’s Engineering & Life </li></ul><ul><li>http:// www.engineerguy.com/archive/archive.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Audio and transcriptions of 2- to 3-minute radio programs on the engineering involved in everyday things, from pop-can top design to contact lenses to ultrasound imaging. </li></ul><ul><li>National Public Radio </li></ul><ul><li>This site contains national and international news and information. Selected stories have complete transcripts for their audio. Some you will have to search for. However, the following link contains audio and transcripts for stories related to the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.npr.org/templates/archives/archive.php?thingId=1101 </li></ul><ul><li>iTunes University </li></ul>
  • 23. References <ul><li>Canale, M. & Swain, M. (1980). Theoretical bases of communicative approach to second language teaching and testing. Applied Linguistics, 1, 1-47. </li></ul><ul><li>Carvalho, A., Aguiar, C., Carvalho, C. J., Cabecinhas, R. (2008). Influence of podcasts characteristics on higher students’ acceptance. In BONK, C. J. ; LEE, M. M. ; REYNOLDS, T. H., ed. lit. - “World conference on e-learning in corporate, government, healthcare, & higher education (E-Learn2008) : proceedings, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, 2008”. http://hdl.handle.net/1822/8459 . Retrieved March 8, 2009. </li></ul><ul><li>Gilbert, J. (1984). Clear speech: Pronunciation and listening comprehension in American English. New York: Cambridge University Press. </li></ul><ul><li>Murphy, J. (1991). Oral communication in TESOL: Integrating speaking, listening, an pronunciation. TESOL Quarterly (25) 1, 51-75 </li></ul><ul><li>Morley, J. (1994) A multidimensional curriculum design. In J. Morley (Ed.), Pronunciation Pedagogy and Theory: New Views, New Directions . 66-91. Alexandria, VA: TESOL </li></ul><ul><li>Rosell-Aguilar, F. (2007). Top of the pods—In search of a podcasting “podagogy” for language learning. CALL, (20) , 471-492. </li></ul>
  • 24. <ul><li>Thanks! </li></ul><ul><li>Questions? </li></ul>
  • 25. Contact Information <ul><li>Patricia Watts [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Sue Ingels [email_address] </li></ul>
  • 26. Student Comments <ul><li>Podcasts offer opportunity to imitate and compare one’s speech with native speaker model. </li></ul><ul><li>Students generally found podcast topics that were interesting, but some requested a broader range of topics and time for class discussion of these topics. </li></ul><ul><li>Majority of students commented negatively about the fast speed of the Scientific American podcasts. This hindered comprehensibility and accurate mimicking of the original. </li></ul><ul><li>88% of students reported plans to use podcasts for self-study. </li></ul>
  • 27. Teacher Comments <ul><li>The biggest concern is planning a cohesive use of the resource as an integrated component of an existing course. </li></ul><ul><li>Actual speech samples may occasionally deviate from rules taught in class. </li></ul><ul><li>These assignments require that the teacher listen to the students’ podcast choices. Budget time accordingly or assign the same podcast to all students. </li></ul>

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