Applied Techniques for Conversion Rate Optimisation - Paul Rouke from PRWD
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Applied Techniques for Conversion Rate Optimisation - Paul Rouke from PRWD

on

  • 1,839 views

Paul Rouke, head of usability and conversion at PRWD, delivered this talk at Northern User Experience on 6th February 2012

Paul Rouke, head of usability and conversion at PRWD, delivered this talk at Northern User Experience on 6th February 2012

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,839
Views on SlideShare
1,589
Embed Views
250

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
42
Comments
0

5 Embeds 250

http://blog.prwd.co.uk 238
http://www.prwd.co.uk 7
http://www.linkedin.com 3
http://us-w1.rockmelt.com 1
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • In this session I will be providing you with some key tips, techniques and case studies of brands can improve the usability, persuasion and conversion rate of their online experiences. I actually provide a full day training course to worldwide clients of Econsultancy on this very subject, so of course this session isn’t going to cover all the elements that you should be paying attention to, but there are some major recommendations which have the potential to significantly increase click-throughs and purchase conversions.
  • At PRWD we help our clients understand their customers and prospects wants, needs and desires, in order to design and refine their online experience to lead to increased conversion rate performance
  • Have hospitals actaully considered that it might not always be women that want to change their babies bum. I see myself as more of a modern dad, and I’m always keen to muck in (literally) – just a shame they don’t have baby changing facilities in the mens toilet. Perhaps if hospitals and other organisations actually asked what their visitors and customers want, they would provide suitable facilities...
  • Credit to Craig Sullivan (@optimsieordie) for first bringing to my attention that some urinals abroad actually feature a fly on the bowl which men instinctively aim at. Why? Well apparently research has demonstrated that peeing in this spot results in the least amount of spillage. A fine example of optimisation for better conversion. They guy at the side of me when I was taking this photo wasn’t too convinced though...
  • I have very recently become a father for the first time, and this is me and our daughter when she was 12 hours old. I couldn’t think of a more powerful example of demonstrating the concept of building trust & confidence with your new born child, especially in those first few precious hours and days.
  • Transparency is such a fundamental ingredient to delivering an e-commerce user experience, and this principle can be applied throughout the browsing & buying user experience. Although as a persuasive technique sex and titillation can be extremely important, I just wasn’t able to find a photo that represented transparency only, hence the lady in the bikini!
  • Of course the concept of removing barriers for users is one of the most fundamental principles of good usability, although there are still many retailers large and small that are putting big barriers up at key stages of the buying process. ASOS have recently removed what was a major barrier for 1 st time visitors and they have seen a huge decrease of abandonment. More on this on later in the presentation
  • Of course the concept of removing barriers for users is one of the most fundamental principles of good usability, although there are still many retailers large and small that are putting big barriers up at key stages of the buying process. ASOS have recently removed what was a major barrier for 1 st time visitors and they have seen a huge decrease of abandonment. More on this on later in the presentation
  • Not that I’m saying all users are like sheep aimlessly wondering around of following each other...
  • As a growing % of visitors arrive on internal pages of e-commerce sites, whether that is category landing pages, lister pages, product pages or promotional pages, it is becoming even more important to consider the ways in which you ensure all visitors have visibility of your key value proposition and selling points. Its no longer sufficient to rely on a big homepage promotion to promote your fantastic free delivery promotion, as most visitors probably won’t even see this.
  • What many of the really big retailers are now doing, with ASOS being one of the first that I recall adopting, is a site-wide ‘USP promotional bar’ under the primary navigation bar. Not only does this mean that all visitors are very likely to at least pay some attention to it, irrespective of where on the website they land initially, but it also provides the retailer with a highly valuable area of real estate in which to promote both key USP’s but also seasonal promotions, strategic activities and other messages which will encourage visitors to shop with them. This approach is fast becoming a design pattern amongst many well recognised, high traffic retailers, which will soon mean that visitors will start expecting to see this type of promotional messaging area – which in turn means visibility of these messages will increase further. It is important to ensure that just a simple visual style is used to not compete with, or merge in to, the primary navigation bar. In these examples the simple use of an underline that ASOS use ensures that visitors know which messages are clickable. Compare this to the John Lewis example which appears more to just be informational messages, even though some visitors would certainly want to know more about some of these messages/USP’s.
  • Providing transparency and visibility of your available delivery options is a fundamental ingredient of the best shopping bag designs. ASOS do this exceptional well by providing visitors with the ability to select different delivery options that are available and see the impact this will have on the total price they will be paying. Not only does this answer the question “what are the delivery options & costs?” but it also sets expectations for the visitor, as well as potentially encouraging them to consider a slightly more expensive delivery option.
  • In the middle of 2011 ASOS introduced a refreshed checkout experience, including this first, crucial stage of checkout. This is an example of probably the most barrier free first pages of checkout that I have seen, and for new customers there is absolutely no ambiguity about what to do next. What this means is that straight away new customers are able to gather momentum moving through their checkout experience, with no nagging issues or concerns about what they are committing to. Combined with their best practice driven shopping bag this delivers a superb experience for new customers.
  • Without the need for major layout changes or technical changes, this simple change, which went through a series of split tests, resulted in the abandonment rate for this page reducing by 50%. For any retailer this would be a major driver of increased sales and profit, but for a retailer the size of ASOS this type of improvement is staggering. This a very powerful example of the importance of removing what really is a huge barrier for online shoppers at the first stage of checkout.
  • Interestingly ASOS still actually force new customers to create an account, but this is simply delivered with the inclusion of a password field in the first form during checkout.
  • Our client Speedo don’t mention anything about creating an account at the start of checkout. Returning customers have the option of signing in to their account, whereas for everyone else, you are simply asked to start providing the information you expect to provide when buying online. There is no reference at all to registration or creating an account, ensuring that what is a huge psychological barrier for people, doesn’t even enter their thought process. This approach ensures that at least for this first stage of checkout you have remove the major barrier that harms many retailers new customer conversion rate.
  • Once you have completed your order with Speedo, the order confirmation is focussed on simply encouraging visitors to enter a password and create their account. As you can see this is all benefit led, with the use of ticks to re-inforce positive messages that are important to new customers. You can also see how the words create account or registration aren’t used, instead all the copy is customer focussed.
  • Our client Lakeland adopt a very similar approach to ASOS in keeping the decision making process for new customers to an absolute minimum. One additional piece of customer information that is featured on the Lakeland checkout is informing customers that they will have the option of creating an account at the end of the process, even though this is totally optional. This was added in based specifically on feedback from users during moderated test sessions, where some of them explained that as Lakeland is the type of retailer they would expect to shop from more than once, they would expect to have a facility to create an account and therefore speed up checkout on returning visits. The first version of the page didn’t make this option clear which is why the information has now been added in.
  • As I always recommend retailers do, when you are asking new customers to consider creating an account, making this very much benefit driven for them is crucial. If it isn’t then visitors are much more likely to ignore this option all together. As with the Speedo example the use of ticks provides a visual reference point indicating positive statements to the visitor too.
  • Providing transparency of your delivery options and proposition, along with details of your returns policy, are essential to ensure visitors are quickly able to put their mind at rest without having to go looking for this information on other pages, or in links in the footer. ASOS provide a great example of providing quick and intuitive access to both delivery and returns information, whilst at the same time ensuring that the focus of the page is on the primary product information and the add to bag button. This won’t be the last time I use ASOS as an example of e-commerce best practice in this presentation!
  • In order to help visitors make an informed decision on whether or not this product is right for them, its vital that you understand the wants and needs of visitors when it comes to considering purchasing your products. In this example Arei performs much better than the LL Bean product page, as they recognise that an important part of hiking boots for potential customers is the quality of the tread. They have used customer purchase behaviour insights to identify this requirement and have provided visitors with more than just a standard photograph of the product. This approach doesn’t just apply to product photos – you need to ensure both written and visual product information allows visitors to make an informed purchase decision.
  • This last question is the big one that I would recommend for identifying what specific information you can provide at key stages of your user experience for new customers to consider engaging or buying from you you. Sadly not enough businesses will be doing this at the moment, but it can be as simple as speaking with your customer services team.
  • Booking.com place persuasive design at the heart of the browsing experience, and their search results page in particular provides a hige range of persuasive design techniques. Although from a pure usability and aethetics point of view you could argue that this page is quite cluttered, but Booking.com do continual testing and optimisation to determine the most effective page designs and use of content. This translates in this quite busy but highly optimal page which is all geared around persuading visitors to book with them and not other hotel search engines.
  • From the very start of their business Naked Wines have put their customers, who are both wine makers and wine drinkers, at the heart of their business strategy and online experience. As an example their homepage features many persuasive elements such as the countdown clock to get next day delivery, the prominent scrolling ‘what’s happening right now?’ area, and other elements such as the use of ticks to demonstrate positive messages about their proposition.
  • As with ASOS, Currys also recognise the importance of providing cstrong visibility of both the security messages and payment options. These are 2 primary persuasive elements regarding ensuring visitors have confidence and trust to buy from the retailer,
  • Further transparency of both payment options and the security measures in place is provided very clearly by ASOS. A key point to remember is that if such a trusted and well recognised brand like ASOS recognise the importance of these messages at this stage, especially security assurances, then it is even more important for lesser known brands, irrespective of sector/products being sold. I have provided a detailed breakdown of the ASOS shopping bag design in an Econsultancy article - http://bit.ly/ASOSbbp
  • Along with the theme of security, some retailers like John Lewis re-inforce the security message in the wording on their checkout button. This is an ideal quick test that retailers can try to determine whether for their audience the added reference to security has a positive impact on click-throughs in to checkout.
  • ASOS use the words ‘Pay Securely Now’ on their call to action button, and this resulted in a 3% uplift in conversion when tested against their previous checkout button ‘Proceed to checkout’.
  • By simply testing the wording of the primary call to action button on their shopping bag, ASOS saw a 3% uplift in click-through rate by featuring the word securely on the button text. This demonstrates that irrespective of brand size and credibility, providing assurances to visitors is absolutely essential.
  • I think this is the best time to do the moderated session, “ we ’ ve done enough talking, now let ’ s do some testing! ” Volunteers please?
  • As I have demonstrated these tips and techniques are clearly extremely important to what are some of the worlds biggest brands in their sector. The concept of providing greater transparency, building trust and removing barrier are all key elements, so the message is if they are so important for brands with huge credibility and brand awareness, they are even more important for every other retailer.
  • Please feel free to connect with me on either Linkedin or Twitter. My Linkedin profile in particular provides a large number of client recommendations, and more about our work, services, clients, case studies and testimonials can be seen on our website.
  • I highly recommend you bookmark the resources page as this is continually updated with best practice articles, case studies and presentations on usability, persuasion and conversion optimisation. Thank you for taking the time to look through these slides, its much appreciated and I hope it has been of use

Applied Techniques for Conversion Rate Optimisation - Paul Rouke from PRWD Applied Techniques for Conversion Rate Optimisation - Paul Rouke from PRWD Presentation Transcript

  •  
  • What is Usability and User Experience? I hope you’re going to enjoy this session as much as an OAP I entertained recently...
  •  
  • What is Usability and User Experience? Someone then tweeted me “The mind boggles…” … thankfully this is my earlier tweet
  •  
  • Applied Techniques for Conversion Rate Optimisation by Paul Rouke Head of Usability & Conversion at PRWD 6th February 2012 @ NUX Manchester
      • I run the UK ’ s Leading North West Based Usability & Conversion Optimisation Consultancy
    About Me
    • I provide public and in-house training for Econsultancy’s global clients including Tesco, O2 and Santander
    • I provide services to help brands improve their website conversion rate
      • Usability testing (moderated & remote)
      • Expert evaluations
      • Usability training
      • In-house consultancy
      • Conversion rate optimisation
  • PRWD Clients Include Brands I work with include...
  • A bit of toilet humour Key conversion principles Applied conversion techniques Summary Session agenda
  •  
  • We all know how important it is to be considerate of what people want… especially when buying Christmas presents… …look what can happen when we’re not
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • What is Usability and User Experience? a short case study...
  •  
  • Matthew Lawson, Head of conversion at Appliances Online “ I introduced user-centered design, but I had to get the business bought into it. So I did this by buying 125 videos from WhatUsersDo, where you set a task for a customer to go away onto your site and try and make a purchase”
  • “ This gave us 250 hours of footage which was too much content to watch through. So I used crowd sourcing... we gave five videos to each senior manager including the CEO and this gave us insight into what we needed to change from our proposition, the size of the images to where we put the buy button and it actually gave our customers a voice which went directly to the managers ”
  • What is Usability and User Experience? Results?
  • 9.5% increase in sales 37% more visitors viewed product videos 11% increase in customer reviews 33% reduction in calls about delivery
  • A bit of toilet humour Key conversion principles Applied conversion techniques Summary Session agenda
  • What is Usability and User Experience? Why end users do what you want them to...
  • They trust the website owner
  • The website is being transparent
  • They aren’t presented with perceived barriers to entry
  • They are able to focus on what they are there for http://www.flickr.com/photos/karen_roe/4417259305/sizes/o/in/photostream/
  • They don’t have to take a leap of faith http://www.flickr.com/photos/carla777/1039697509/in/photostream/
  • Other people have already done it and are ‘mostly’ happy http://www.flickr.com/photos/carla777/1039697509/in/photostream/
  • What is Usability and User Experience? Why end users do what the website wants them to >> They trust the website owner >> The website is being transparent >> They have confidence in the website owner >> They aren’t presented with perceived barriers >> They are able to focus on what they want to do >> They don’t have to take a leap of faith >> They see that other people have done it already
  • A bit of toilet humour Key conversion principles Applied conversion techniques Summary Session agenda
  • What is Usability and User Experience? Some Key Conversion Techniques I have Learnt Over The Last 13 Years...
  • What is Usability and User Experience? Providing site wide visibility of your value proposition How can brands ensure their visitors see their key value proposition & unique selling points?
  • Introduce a site-wide promotional bar under your primary navigation – this is becoming a design pattern on major retail sites, and consumers will come to expect this
  • What is Usability and User Experience? The power of ‘free xxx’ How consumers respond when they are offered something for free* *irrespective of whether what you are getting for free is built in to the price “ Standard delivery is free. That is really good. There is usually a minimum spend limit”
  • What is Usability and User Experience? Transparency of key parts of the proposition prior to commitment Ensuring the visitor knows the unknowns, rather than taking a leap of faith “ Delivery information is right there. I don’t need to go to another page in order to find out the delivery options and costs when I’m viewing a product page”
  • Provide transparency around your delivery proposition, options and costs – don’t force visitors to take a leap of faith into your checkout
  • What is Usability and User Experience? Allow the user to focus on what they want to do Cross selling is good in the right places, but it shouldn’t distract the user from buying “ Now this recommended products, I don't like this being on the basket page, I find it un-necessary. Yes it might make me go and buy something else, but you are taking me away from the checkout, you're making me look at other stuff. You're making me maybe doubt the other stuff I have in my bag. It makes me more likely to think, oh hang on I've seen those same jeans at ASOS, £20 less, maybe I should go and do my shopping there. Perhaps this is the wrong page to put such a big recommended products there”
  • What is Usability and User Experience? Don’t force or appear to be forcing un-necessary action Users perception of requirements can be highly toxic and seriously harm conversion rates Just ask ASOS
  • ASOS provide one the most simple, barrier free checkout pages for new customers – simply asking them to continue
  • Compare this to their previous design which forced new customers to create an account in order to checkout
  • What is Usability and User Experience? How did this change in message and call to action impact the performance of this page Abandonment Rate Was Reduced by 50%
  • ASOS then simply ask new customers to choose a password as part of their checkout process – turning what is a huge ‘perceived’ usability barrier in to simply entering a few characters in to 1 text field
  • Speedo mention nothing about creating an account at the start of checkout – leaving new customers to simply get on with entering their details to place their order
  • It is only at the end of checkout that Speedo encourage new customers to create an account – almost making it a ‘no-brainer’ – and they get over 75% of new customers choosing to create an account
  • What is Usability and User Experience? How does this approach impact new customer account creation rates for Speedo? 77% of new customers* choose to create an account * Not forgetting the crucial 0% abandonment rate at the start of checkout
  • Lakeland also provide new customers with 1 option – continue – whilst at the same time providing confirmation to new customers that they can create an account at the end
  • Lakeland then provide clear customer focussed reasons as to why the new customer will want to create an account – once again making it almost a no-brainer
  • What is Usability and User Experience? Provide the right level of detail to allow users to make informed decisions Think beyond the most obvious things and provide the necessary content “ The images look nice on a white background, but there is something missing if I don’t see them on a model wearing them. I also expect to see videos of products now as you can get a real sense of how the product looks when worn”
  • Provide complete transparency of your delivery and returns proposition – which means don’t hide them from consumers
  • Provide the right level of product detail, both written and visual, to allow visitors to make informed purchase decisions
  • What is Usability and User Experience? Answer visitor questions when you are expecting them to engage with you Think beyond the most obvious things and provide the necessary content
  • Test version A Does answering questions improve conversion?
  • Test version B Does answering questions improve conversion?
  • Test version A v Test version B - RESULTS + 66% Does answering questions improve conversion?
    • What questions do our offline customers often ask us?
    • What questions can we answer to help visitors make a decision ?
    • Are any of our key pages currently confusing for new visitors ?
    • What’s the number 1 question our customers currently ask us?
    Questions for website owners…
  • What is Usability and User Experience? Utilise persuasive design techniques to encourage conversion Combining different techniques can turbo charge your optimisation efforts
  • View a detailed analysis here - http://bit.ly/bookingBP Booking.com feature a wide variety of persuasion techniques, particularly on their search results pages
  • Scarcity Recency Social Proof How they create urgency...
  • Booking.com provide live updates to demonstrate the recency of when other people are booking specific hotels – as well as providing extensive & detailed rating and reviews
  • What is Usability and User Experience? Social Proof Demonstrating that there are other people who have chosen to make the same buying decision you are considering
  • Groupon make it clear how many other people have chosen to purchase each particular deal, providing evidence in numbers to persuade the visitor to take up the deal too
  • For over 3 years The Book Depository has provided a live shopping feed, integrating consumer purchasing with a Google Map to demonstrate continuous buying throughout the world – plus promotion of their free delivery proposition
  • For over 3 years The Book Depository has provided a live shopping feed, integrating consumer purchasing with a Google Map to demonstrate continuous buying throughout the world – plus promotion of their free delivery proposition
  • Amazon were one of the first retailers to implement both customer ratings and customer buying activity to encourage visitors to make purchase decisions through activity of others
  • Kiddicare use customer rating and reviews as an integral part of how they promote and sell their products – they recognise the wisdom of crowds is more powerful than what they say about their products (and they frame the reviewers so that users can associate with them more)
  • Naked Wines deliver a unique and highly persuasive e-commerce experience for new and returning visitors – they are delivering a truly user-centric online experience & business strategy
  • What is Usability and User Experience? Irrespective of brand credibility, demonstrating trust/security is paramount From logos to button wording, confidence and trust can be instilled in the user “ I can purchase securely which is good to see. I can see the Global security symbol prominently so I can assume that this is a safe and secure site”
  • Provide visibility and clarity of both your security measures and your accepted payment methods
  • Provide visibility and clarity of both your security measures and your accepted payment methods View a detailed analysis of the ASOS shopping here - http://bit.ly/ASOSbbp
  • Introduce the word ‘secure’ or ‘securely’ on your call to action button – this is a simple but potentially highly effective test you can do to optimise your conversion rate
  • Introduce the word ‘secure’ or ‘securely’ on your call to action button – this is a simple but potentially highly effective test you can do to optimise your basket conversion rate
  • 3% uplift
  • What is Usability and User Experience? Utilise user testing to uncover brand perception questions and much more User or usability testing doesn’t just have to be about the web experience (plus you may get some surprising insights!)
  • What is Usability and User Experience? 67 business questions usability testing can answer http://bit.ly/67questions
  • A bit of toilet humour Key conversion principles Applied conversion techniques Summary Session agenda
  • Summary These are my 6 applied techniques for conversion rate optimisation
  • Connect with me http://uk.linkedin.com/in/paulrouke Office: +44 (0)161 228 0585 Mobile: +44 (0)7739 745 126 Email: paulrouke @ prwd.co.uk Web: http://www.prwd.co.uk PRWD 22 Lever Street Manchester M1 1EA United Kingdom http://twitter.com/paulrouke
  • Thankyou for listening to “ Applied Techniques for Conversion Rate Optimisation ” by Paul Rouke Slides and usability & conversion best practice available here: http://bit.ly/CROresources