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Pivec workshop 1

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Slides (1) from the LUDUS workshop held in Kranj on the 15th of November 2011

Slides (1) from the LUDUS workshop held in Kranj on the 15th of November 2011

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  • Welcome. My name is Maja Pivec and I am here to talk About game based learning or learning from digital games.
  • Digital natives want to learn with computer games! - Really? Gee suggests that learning is problem solving and gaining understanding Games do this, but he also states that games are only social.
  • Digital natives want to learn with computer games! - Really? Gee suggests that learning is problem solving and gaining understanding Games do this, but he also states that games are only social.
  • Digital natives want to learn with computer games! - Really? Gee suggests that learning is problem solving and gaining understanding Games do this, but he also states that games are only social.
  • But kids today don ’t play Tetris. We surveyed over 500 students and they play role plays and FPS games/ You should also note that contrary to what they say in the US, not All young people are gamers. 23% of those surveyed don ’t play games at all. In fact at a University level, we will sometimes get an intake of 75 students, with over half not being and never have been gamers.
  • Kids today play first person shooters, not Tetris. But the learning is still there. The First-Person Shooter “Counter Strike”, has been shown to improve cognitive functions Such as divided attention and decision processing. However, I am not advocating that we install Counter Strike in the classroom.
  • But First Person Shooters can be and currently are successfully utilised to teach Mathematics. The FPS game Dimexian from Tabular Digital teaches Algebra in An interesting and immersive game that has won awards at many educational conferences. The game is well designed, non-voilent (apart from blowing up the occasional alien robot) And has teacher handbooks showing where it fits within the lesson plan.Unfortunately This product is US based and tailored towards the US school system.
  • Neverwinter Nights is a Fantasy Role Play Game or RPG, another Popular game genre that is played a great deal. Situated in a medieval village The player in NWN uses spells to battle with the evil forces. But this commercial game uses a Scripting engine to create conversational dialogs with the player.
  • The University of Minnesota utilised this to create their own dialogs and modified the game To teach first year journalism students. They tool the context of a textbook and built the lessons into the game and created “ Disaster at Harpville”. This has been used at University level for five years and is very successful.
  • For the younger age group we have the Penguin Club. Owned by Disney, the Penguin Club has over 100 million subscribers. The product is basically a chat room in the form of a virtual world on cartoon penguins. The players can communicate with each other, complete small tasks for points, and play mini games with other penguins.
  • Mingoville is based on a very similar concept. However, the primary goal is to teach english language skills to children. Developed in Denmark in 2007, Mingoville now has over 1 million users, and has grown into one of the largest English learning communities online.
  • Buzz is a party game, played on a game console attached to the TV. Played by people of all ages Buzz is a quiz game controller by the game character, with questions of general knowledge in a fun environment
  • Take the same idea, put it on an iPhone and a web site, link it to the school curriculum, have a reward system of minigames, And you have a motivational study aid for students of all ages. 3MRT of Scotland built inQuizitor and aligned it with the UK schooling curriculum To be a valuable learning resource.
  • I would like to leave you with one last thought (Read Slide).
  • One of the areas that all students have problems with, and this affects teachers even when hen choosing a game to use within the class, is gender. Is the game gender neutral or for girls or guys. I could spend an hour just talking about this, and I do for the students, But just briefly….
  • Males and Females are different, we all know this. But their needs and expectations from a game are also different. Guys like the know that they can win, and compete to do this. And when they are shot, they should die, and lose. Girls do want his at all, this is probably why there are not many Girls FPS gamers, there are some and they are very good, but not many.
  • Girls like games with adventure, sims games, activity games like Sing Star. You will rarely see a guy play Sing Star. And animal games like My little Pony And Nintendogs, are Girls Games. Nintendo and Sony recognized this and created A complete line of Pink PSPs and Dual Screen devices specifically for Girls. But Notice that both genders like Role Play Games.
  • Role Play Games a traditional Gender neutral. Many contain Fantasy and some even have Humor. Humor is very much gender neutral. A good rewards system and complex storyline, and you have a game that reaches twice your Target market. Another feature is to have a likeable character central to the story line. This can be a Gender neutral character or gender specific.
  • Faith Conners from Mirrors Edge is obviously very female and who I based my Powerpoint theme on today. This game is very popular with both guys and girls.
  • We all know the infamous Lara fro Tomb Raider. Again, this game appeals to Both genders. To girls, because Lara is a hero and shows that girls can Kick butt too, and to guys, probably because they think Lara is hot.
  • Metroid Prime is very popular amongst the males because it is a FPS type adventure Game. And perhaps many don ’t realise that it is a woman inside the space suit. The handheld version of the game, more of and adventure game, is played by both genders.
  • But the guys have their heros as well. Master Chief Petty Officer John 117, although he is fondly referred to as just Master Chief. He is the hero of the long running series Halo. Very much a Guys game.
  • Duke Nukem is also very male orientated, and very macho. I don ’t think you will get many girls playing this game.
  • Mario is Male and although he doesn ’t compare to Duke, he kicks butt as well. Mario appeals to both genders and has become an icon over the years of gaming. In summary, a central female character or non macho character appeals to both Genders. Whereas a very male character is only played by guys.
  • But more often today, in may games the play chooses or creates their own ]character. You can be male or female, interestingly many guys play as female Characters. You can have blond hair, you can be big or small, be green. Character customization has become what players expect and it helps The players invest into the game. For a learning game, this is good.
  • You can also be non-human and have no gender at all. Or you can be “you”. Many players will create their avatat to Look exactly like they do. This outs them into the game world Instead of merely controlling a character in the world.
  • But we are all different.
  • But we are all different.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Play to Learn Game-Based Learning Applications Kranj Workshop, 2011 Professor Dr Maja Pivec & Dr Paul Pivec
    • 2. Professor Dr. Maja Pivec PhD, Msc, Bsc.
      • Award winning Researcher
        • Lectures on GBL and e-Learning
        • Editor and Author of GBL publications
        • 22 years Industry and Academic experience
        • Project management of major framework consortiums
    • 3. Dr. Paul Pivec PhD, MComp, GDipHE.
      • Award winning Developer
        • Developer of Applications and Serious Games
        • Producer of Commercial Entertainment Games
        • 32 years Industry and Academic experience
        • Project mentoring of award winning development companies
    • 4. Workshop Structure
      • Lecture 1
        • Game Genres for Learning
        • Target Audience Analysis
        • Formulating Game Ideas
      • Group Work
        • Formulating Specific Areas of Interest
        • Deciding on Game Genres and Platforms
    • 5. Workshop Structure
      • Lecture 2
        • Guidelines to Successful Game Design
        • User Interface Design
        • Success Factor Analysis
      • Group Work
        • Critical Analysis of Specific Games
        • Suggested improvements to ideas, genres, and platforms
    • 6. Workshop Structure
      • Lecture 3
        • Development Tools & game Engines
        • Budgets and Funding Strategies
        • Marketing Concepts
      • Group/Individual Work (post course)
        • Further Analysis of Games Ideas
        • Suggested Future Action and Plans
    • 7. Game Genres for Learning Digital game genres played by Students Other Genres include Driving, Fighting, Strategy, Sports, Simulations
    • 8. Game Genres for Learning
      • Counter Strike (FPS)
      • Visual Searching
      • Divided Attention
      • Decision Processing
      • Fine Motor Skills
    • 9. Game Genres for Learning
      • Dimexian (FPS)
      • Scatter Plots
      • Linear Analysis
      • Co-ordinate Systems
      • Linear Equations
      • Basic Algebra
    • 10. Game Genres for Learning
      • Neverwinter Nights (RPG)
      • Literacy
      • Communication
      • Collaboration
    • 11. Game Genres for Learning
      • Disaster at Harperville (RPG)
      • First Year Journalism
      • Searching for Facts
      • Monitoring Situations
      • Interviewing Techniques
    • 12. Game Genres for Learning
      • Penguin Club (Chat Room)
      • Socialization
      • Game skills
      • Basic skills
    • 13. Game Genres for Learning
      • Mingoville (Online)
      • English Language
      • Literacy
      • Explorative Learning
      • Social Collaboration
    • 14. Game Genres for Learning
      • Buzz (Party Game)
      • Factual Knowledge
      • Memory Retention
      • Repetition
    • 15. Game Genres for Learning
      • InQuizitor (iPhone)
      • Quiz Game
      • Mini Games
      • Curriculum Linked
      • Study Aid
    • 16. Game Genres for Learning
      • physioFun (Wii)
      • Motivation using Narrative
      • Exercise Tracking
    • 17. Games for Learning “ If learning is defined as the acquisition of knowledge or skills through experience, practice, or study, then Digital Games can be successfully used as supplement to traditional teaching and support quality learning. ” (Pivec, 2010)
    • 18. Gender in Computer Games
      • Target Audience Analysis
      • Guy Gamers versus Girl Gamers
      • Gender Neutral Game Design
    • 19. Gender in Computer Games
      • Girls like to….
      • Adventure within the game
      • be forgiven for failure
      • have low frustration
      • Guys like to….
      • “ Win” within the game
      • be punished for failure
      • have competition
    • 20. Gender in Computer Games
      • Girls like ….
      • Sims Games
      • Adventure Games
      • Activity Games
      • Animal Games
      • Role Play Games
      • Guys like ….
      • First Person Shooters
      • Real Time Strategy
      • Racing Games
      • Strategy Games
      • Role Play Games
    • 21. Gender in Computer Games
      • Gender Neutral Design
      • Role Play Games
      • Fantasy & Humor
      • Rewards not Punishment
      • Complex Activities and Storyline
      • Likeable central Character
    • 22. Gender in Computer Games
      • Faith Conners
      • “ Mirrors Edge ”
      • (EA Digital)
    • 23. Gender in Computer Games
      • Lara Croft
      • “ Tomb Raider ”
      • (Crystal Dynamics)
    • 24. Gender in Computer Games
      • Samus Aran
      • “ Metroid Prime ”
      • (Retro Studios)
    • 25. Gender in Computer Games
      • Master Chief
      • “ Halo ”
      • (Bungie)
    • 26. Gender in Computer Games
      • Duke
      • “ Duke Nukem ”
      • (3D Realms).
    • 27. Gender in Computer Games
      • Mario
      • “ Mario Series ”
      • (Nintendo)
    • 28. Gender in Computer Games
      • World of Warcraft
      • (Blizzard Entertainment)
      Star Wars Galaxies (Sony Online)
    • 29. Gender in Computer Games
      • Aion
      • (Aion Development)
      Spore (Maxis)
    • 30. Gender in Computer Games
      • Coca-Cola
      • (Superbowl Advertisement)
    • 31. Serious Computer Games
      • Group Work
        • Formulating Specific Areas of Interest
          • Choose an idea for a Serious Game
          • Suggest why Digital games would be appropriate to the topic and Audience
        • Deciding on Game Genres and Platforms
          • Choose the Genre and Platform
          • Suggest why these are appropriate
        • Report back to the Class

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