Leapoffaith
Guilherme Paulovicguilherme@paulovic.orgpaulovic.org
The questionsometimes isthe question.?
Have you ever tried highjump?Image credits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/george_eastman_house/3333249917/
Image credits: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBtBdNHBNSI
Image credits: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBtBdNHBNSI
It seems to be not soeasy.And in fact, it is not.
Let’s watch avideo.Image credits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationalarchives/3002426059/
Indeed, at the1968Olympics in Mexico itwas the first time eversomeone jumped in thatfashion.
Mind-blowing, huh?That’s weird.
Can you imagine how ithad been before?
In the beginning it wasSTRADDLE, SCISSORSetc etc ...
Let’swatchanothervideo.Image credits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationalarchives/3002426059/
Image credits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/statelibraryofnsw/7627979920/Straddle.
Image credits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/national_library_of_australia_commons/7673975586/Scissors.
Old-fashioned.Blame it onDick Fosbury.
Dick Fosbury“Fearless Fosbury is a 21-year-old senior at Oregon StateUniversity with a major in civilengineering, two bad ...
In the 1960s he was anunremarkable (kid)athlete who preferredthe scissors jumpingstyle.
His coach would forcehim to use the then-popular straddletechnique.
He couldn’t have jumpedmore than 1.62m.
Then, when he was 16he started scissoringagain and he cleared1.77m.
He adapted the scissorsstyle with a twist at thelast moment beforejumping.
This way he jumped2.0m and won a nationaljunior championship.
He got it right andheaded to Olympics inMexico City.
A crowded stadium,quiet spectators and anawkward movement.
The rest is history.
Experts said he’d breakhis neck, but...
But he broke theOlympic record and wongold jumping 2.24m.
Anyway, it was strange.Really strange.
Fosbury evolved histechnique based onother ones he was usedto.
He used adifferentlens.Image credits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationaalarchief/4192749083
There was no “eureka”moment. It took timeand a series of errorsand attempts.
So that he could jumpgraciously.
Sometimes we havecrazy ideas, awkwardthoughts and we’re theonly ones who believeon it.
We are told to bewrong, and wesometimes are.
But to those genuinethings that blossom inour thoughts.
We’d better experimentand refine it.
Fosbury Flop haschanged the sportdespite skepticism fromcoaches and judges.
We should jump on ourcrazy ideas too.
That’s it.Let’s rock!
Leap of faith
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Leap of faith

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Leap of faith

  1. 1. Leapoffaith
  2. 2. Guilherme Paulovicguilherme@paulovic.orgpaulovic.org
  3. 3. The questionsometimes isthe question.?
  4. 4. Have you ever tried highjump?Image credits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/george_eastman_house/3333249917/
  5. 5. Image credits: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBtBdNHBNSI
  6. 6. Image credits: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBtBdNHBNSI
  7. 7. It seems to be not soeasy.And in fact, it is not.
  8. 8. Let’s watch avideo.Image credits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationalarchives/3002426059/
  9. 9. Indeed, at the1968Olympics in Mexico itwas the first time eversomeone jumped in thatfashion.
  10. 10. Mind-blowing, huh?That’s weird.
  11. 11. Can you imagine how ithad been before?
  12. 12. In the beginning it wasSTRADDLE, SCISSORSetc etc ...
  13. 13. Let’swatchanothervideo.Image credits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationalarchives/3002426059/
  14. 14. Image credits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/statelibraryofnsw/7627979920/Straddle.
  15. 15. Image credits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/national_library_of_australia_commons/7673975586/Scissors.
  16. 16. Old-fashioned.Blame it onDick Fosbury.
  17. 17. Dick Fosbury“Fearless Fosbury is a 21-year-old senior at Oregon StateUniversity with a major in civilengineering, two bad feet, aworn-out body, an unbelievablestyle of high-jumping head firston his back, a habit of talking tohimself in midair (...)” - NYTimes, Oct 20th, 1968.
  18. 18. In the 1960s he was anunremarkable (kid)athlete who preferredthe scissors jumpingstyle.
  19. 19. His coach would forcehim to use the then-popular straddletechnique.
  20. 20. He couldn’t have jumpedmore than 1.62m.
  21. 21. Then, when he was 16he started scissoringagain and he cleared1.77m.
  22. 22. He adapted the scissorsstyle with a twist at thelast moment beforejumping.
  23. 23. This way he jumped2.0m and won a nationaljunior championship.
  24. 24. He got it right andheaded to Olympics inMexico City.
  25. 25. A crowded stadium,quiet spectators and anawkward movement.
  26. 26. The rest is history.
  27. 27. Experts said he’d breakhis neck, but...
  28. 28. But he broke theOlympic record and wongold jumping 2.24m.
  29. 29. Anyway, it was strange.Really strange.
  30. 30. Fosbury evolved histechnique based onother ones he was usedto.
  31. 31. He used adifferentlens.Image credits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nationaalarchief/4192749083
  32. 32. There was no “eureka”moment. It took timeand a series of errorsand attempts.
  33. 33. So that he could jumpgraciously.
  34. 34. Sometimes we havecrazy ideas, awkwardthoughts and we’re theonly ones who believeon it.
  35. 35. We are told to bewrong, and wesometimes are.
  36. 36. But to those genuinethings that blossom inour thoughts.
  37. 37. We’d better experimentand refine it.
  38. 38. Fosbury Flop haschanged the sportdespite skepticism fromcoaches and judges.
  39. 39. We should jump on ourcrazy ideas too.
  40. 40. That’s it.Let’s rock!
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