SDI: A prespective from a UK archaeological unit

889 views
803 views

Published on

Presented at the CAA 2012 conference in Southampton, March 2012

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
889
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
74
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

SDI: A prespective from a UK archaeological unit

  1. 1. Wessex Archaeology SDI: A perspective from a UK archaeological unit Concepts and ideas to practical implementationPaul Cripps•Geomatics Manager, Wessex Archaeology•Archaeological Computing Research Group, University of Southamptonhttp://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.
  2. 2. Wessex Archaeology Overview • Why? – Benefits of SDI based approaches • How? – How do we use the tools available? – Workflows & Systems – Advantages/disadvantages • The story so far… • Where next…?http://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.
  3. 3. Wessex Archaeology Why…? • Need to manage spatial data effectively – Discovery – Retrieval – Use & re-use – Publication & Dissemination • Bulk of archaeological data is spatial or can be spatially referenced • Improvements in – Quality – Accessibility (internal & external) – Efficiencyhttp://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.
  4. 4. Wessex Archaeology Current context • Disparate resources, silos, disjointed data management – Wastes time/money – duplicated effort • Need for efficiency – Cost savings – Improved workflows – Frees up time to focus on what matters • Change Management @ Wessex Archaeology – Satellite offices – Process Modelling – Integration • Aim: Improved, effective business processes – Data flows; is enhanced, reused, shared, published, archived • Can use GIS/SDI based approaches to help achieve thishttp://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.
  5. 5. Wessex Archaeology What is SDI? • A Spatial Data Infrastructure is a framework of geographic data, metadata, users and tools that are interactively connected in order to use spatial data in an efficient and flexible way • The technologies, policies, standards, human resources, and related activities necessary to create, acquire, process, distribute, use, maintain, and preserve spatial data • a coordinated series of agreements on technology standards, institutional arrangements, and policies that enable the discovery and use of geospatial information by users and for purposes other than those it was created forhttp://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.
  6. 6. Wessex Archaeology What is SDI? • software client(s) - to display, query, and analyse spatial data (eg Desktop/web GIS, CAD) • a catalogue service - for the discovery, browsing, and querying of metadata or spatial services, spatial datasets and other resources • spatial data webservices - allowing the delivery of data via the Internet to disparate clients / platforms • processing services - such as datum and projection transformations • a (spatial) data repository - to store data • GIS software - to create and update spatial datahttp://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.
  7. 7. Wessex Archaeology SDI @ Wessex Archaeology • Design: – Theoretical issues – Practical issues • Implementation – Software – Hardware – Users – Protocols, policies, procedures, traininghttp://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.
  8. 8. Wessex Archaeology SDI @ Wessex Archaeology • Theoretical Design issues • Needs to support the archaeological process – Multi-vocality – Assertion & inference, evidential trails – Revision, version control & iterative thought processes • Discovery & consumption of external data – WMS/WFS easy, but needs to reference particular version of any data • Provision of data externally – Linked Open Data • User interactions – Must be positive! – Easy to use; help & support not additional drain on resourceshttp://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.
  9. 9. Wessex Archaeology SDI @ Wessex Archaeology • Practical Design issues • Costs! – Needs to be affordable – Needs to offer recognisable cost-benefits – Development time, licenses, etc • Systems Development & Maintenance – Modularity; easy to replace components – Modularity; tackle big picture piecemeal (=achievable) • Platforms – Skills – Interoperability & standards compliancehttp://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.
  10. 10. Wessex Archaeology SDI @ Wessex Archaeology • Implementation; software • Combination of platforms; modular – Web based mapping for resource discovery & basic interrogation – CAD + GIS clients for data management – Mobile clients for fieldwork • Open source vs proprietary – Pragmatic; use what is most effective – Components; modularhttp://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.
  11. 11. Wessex Archaeology SDI @ Wessex Archaeology • Implementation; software • GRASS, R, QGIS • ArcGIS (desktop, mobile, – Analysis, processing, server & cloud) visualisation – data capture, management, • Homebrew: ‘Ladybird’ & processing specialist tools • Geoserver – Field survey data processing, – web mapping, data marine geophysics analysis management, search & workflow retrieval – Project initiation, planning & • OpenLayers, OpenSpace management – web based interfaces • SQL Server, PostGIS, MS Access • AutoCAD Map – Data & metadata repositories – data management • Interfaces to corporate • GoogleMaps, PocketGIS, Leica systems Smartworx – Accounts, project – mobile mapping, data capture management, etchttp://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.
  12. 12. Wessex Archaeology SDI @ Wessex Archaeology • Implementation; hardware • Survey instruments • Desktop/laptop PCs – Leica Viva – General use, off-the-shelf – Mobile Matrix • GIS Workstations • Mobile platforms – Specialist geoprocessing, – Tablets for building recording analysis – Tablets/mini-tablets for on-site – Custom built indices/records • Servers – Smartphones – File servers • Thin clients – Application servers; remote – Access to remote apps applications – Access to web apps – Web servers – GIS servershttp://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.
  13. 13. Wessex Archaeology SDI @ Wessex Archaeology • Implementation; users • Needs to support the • The soft stuff archaeological process – Buy in important – Empowerment – Quality • Equally important! • Training • Needs to support corporate objectives – Use of GIS – Efficiency – Survey techniques – Internal procedures • Documentation – Internal/External standards – Self-service – Business intelligence, • 1st & 2nd level support planning, etc – Protocols, availability, escalationhttp://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.
  14. 14. Wessex Archaeology SDI @ Wessex Archaeology • Advantages • Disadvantages • Improved use and re-use • Investment of spatial data – Capital expenditure • Better access to & – Skills & training sharing of (meta)data • Potentially complex • Information Systems and architecture workflows in harmony • Need for wider adoption • Efficiency to realise full potential – Eg limited access to • Cost-savings external data sourceshttp://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.
  15. 15. Wessex Archaeology Where next…? • Greater adoption of such approaches within heritage sector • Broader initiatives in place and/or in development – eg Inspire • Digital archives eg ADS – Eg Deposition of fieldwork data as CRM-EH RDF – Facilitates search, retrieval, re-use – Facilitates consumption of (meta)data by eg WA SDI • Contractors & service providers – Minimum standards/specifications for digital data as part of WSI – Reduce dependence on dead trees – Benefits for all through more efficient use of digital (spatial) datahttp://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.
  16. 16. Wessex Archaeology Where next…? • Greater adoption of such approaches within heritage sector • Local/National inventories eg NMR, HERs, SMRs – Public access to Heritage Gateway API…? – Better concordance between digital records – Improved processes for exchange of (meta)data • Blocks are now largely political not technological – Whose data is it anyway…? – Provision of services, costs, benefits • Does the current model for heritage data management work…? – Costly, restricts access, wastes time, skills shortages, quality of data, etc – Potential for unified SDI with local inputs…? – maximise expertise, minimise wastehttp://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.
  17. 17. Wessex Archaeology Thanks! • For more information, please contact me: • p.cripps@wessexarch.co.uk • www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomaticshttp://www.wessexarch.co.uk/geomatics Computer Applications & Quantitative Methods in Archaeology. Southampton. March 2012.

×