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Visual Strategies

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Presentation for Online and mobile media class. MDIA5003.

Presentation for Online and mobile media class. MDIA5003.

Published in: Education

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  • 1. Visual Strategies
    Paulina Tjandrawibawa
    MDIA5003
  • 2. Introduction
    What is Visual Strategy?
    Concept to explore meaning making practice of visual texts
    (Intertextuality, Genre, Discourse)
    Conclusion
  • 3. The World Wide Web is rapidly becoming
    a popular new medium for communicating messages and ideas.
    Visual elements contribute immediate & greater understanding of the message being presented compared to using text only.
     
    Basic visual design elements used in creating web sites: images, typography, colour, icons, grids and layout
    Introduction
  • 4. What is Visual Strategy?
    It is a strategy of how we use visual elements to:
    -  Complement and emphasize the textual message
    -  Tell story and make meanings of text
    -  Add aesthetic appeal to the web
  • 5. Intertexuality
    Meaning:
    Substituting other texts for experience in daily life as a reference system
    (Lefebvre, 1971)
    (text being defined as anything that can be ‘read’ include books, movies, images, music)
    Can be used for a number of purposes:
    humour, criticism, symbolism
  • 6. Examples of Intertextuality in Popular Media
    Cinema
    Creation of Adam painted by Michaelangelo (circa 1511)
    Bruce Almighty (2003),
    Universal Pictures
  • 7. Cartoon
    Oily animals, Gulf spill
    Obama on day one, Political cartoon
    Television
    News Title
    “ Catch Mei if you can” (reference to Spielberg’s movie title “catch me if you can”, linking to an article on the new Guy Pierce film Mei Mei) – mX News
    The Simpsons
  • 8. Contemporary Art
    • The people wrapped in newspapers represent the faceless and voiceless masses
    • 9. The euphoria of democracy witnessed a flood of new tabloids
    • 10. Newspapers and magazines overwhelming the city with news and opinions thus tending to dwarf our ability to think for ourselves
    Budi Ubrux, “Interruption”
  • 11. Genre
    Meaning:
    Category – often be divided into sub-genre
    (Genre: News, Sub-genre : business, sport,
    technology,...)
    Genre helps inform a potential reader what to expect emotionally, structurally, and intellectually.
    Creates a set of expectations to the reader
  • 12. Sub-genre of web site determined by the function and purpose used to construct web sites (uses of verbal, visual, spatiality, etc)
    Example:
    - www.smh.com.au
    - http://joblankenburg.com/english/
    - http://saizenmedia.com/reinvented/
  • 13. Discourse
    Meaning:
    A set of statements that articulate a particular way of thinking, feeling, and being in the world. (Foucault)
    Example in our culture: Religion
    - Our understanding of historical matters is defined by story tellers/experts.
    - We go on the stories that have been produced and preserved throughout time 
  • 14. Another Example:
    German Fraktur Type which was used in Germany until the end of WW II, has values to be associated with Nazi party.
  • 15. Conclusion
    Visual strategies are chosen for both aesthetic satisfaction and communication effectiveness purpose.
    By using the right strategy it will captivate audience attention.
  • 16. Bibliography
    • Farkas, David and Jean B. Farkas. 2002. Principles of Web Design. Washington:
    Pearson Education, Inc., p241-271
     
    •      McNeil, Patrick. 2008. The Web Designer’s Idea Book. Ohio” HOW Books
    •     Goldman,Robert. Intertextuality.
          http://legacy.lclark.edu/~goldman/hypersig/hypersignification04.html
    •      Ennis, Tim. Translation and Discourse.
         http://www.cels.bham.ac.uk/resources/essays/ennis3.pdf
     
    •      Cross, Laura. Nonfiction Ink. http://www.nonfictionink.com/tag/nonfiction-genre
     
    •     Werner, Walt. On Political Cartoons and Social Studies Textbooks: Visual Analogies,Intertextuality, and Cultural Memory.
         http://www.quasar.ualberta.ca/css/Css_38_2/ARpolitical_cartoons_ss_textbooks.htm
     
    •      http://www.ipreciation.dreamhosters.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=art cle&id 84&Itemid=144
     
    •     Porter, Joshua. Where Visual Design Meets Usability http://www.uie.com/articles/wroblewski_interview_part2/
     
    •       http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Literary_genre
    •       http://penniesandpanopticons.wordpress.com/2010/03/05/critical-reflection-3-the
    notion-of-discourse/