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Living Together: RA Skills for Engaging in Conversations on Diversity and Social Justice

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Originally presented at Resident Assistant Training at Boston College on August 18, 2012. This brief presentation discusses how to approach difficult conversations and confront problematic language …

Originally presented at Resident Assistant Training at Boston College on August 18, 2012. This brief presentation discusses how to approach difficult conversations and confront problematic language around issues of diversity and social justice.

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  • Transcript

    • 1. IV IN G L R E T H E TO GSkills for Engaging in Conversations on Diversity and Social Justice
    • 2. RAWBAT
    • 3. RAWBATResident Assistants will be able to...
    • 4. RAWBAT• Define basic terms including power, privilege, and microagression• Identify instances where microagressions may be occurring• Identify the difference between intent and impact when making statements• Describe “rules of thumb” for successfully navigating difficult conversations around difference
    • 5. ROLES
    • 6. RO What ground rules do we have for ourL discussion today? What roles will we play?ES
    • 7. ROLES
    • 8. R - RespectOLES
    • 9. R - RespectOL - Listen firstES
    • 10. R - RespectOL - Listen firstE What wouldS you add?
    • 11. First, a few concepts...
    • 12. POWER “social oppression exists when one social group, whether knowingly or unconsciously, exploits another social group for its own benefit.”Hardiman, R., & Jackson, B. W. (1997). Conceptual foundations for social justice courses. In M. Adams, L. A. Bell, & P. Griffin (Eds.). Teaching for diversity and social justice: A sourcebook (pp. 16-29). New York, NY: Routledge. (page 17)
    • 13. PRIVILEGE “Both agents, those who are privileged in the hierarchy of oppression, and targets, those who are victimized and penalized, play a role in maintaining oppression.”Bell, L. A. (1997). Theoretical Foundations for Social Justice Education. In M. Adams, L. A. Bell, & P. Griffin (Eds.). Teaching for diversity and social justice: A sourcebook (pp. 16-29). New York, NY: Routledge. (page 12)
    • 14. So...How does thisinfluence how wetalk about thesetopics and issues?
    • 15. m icroaggressions
    • 16. microagressions are...“brief and commonplace dailyverbal, behavioral, orenvironmental indignities, whetherintentional or unintentional, thatcommunicate hostile, derogatory,or negative... slights and insultstoward people...” Sue, Derald Wing; Capodilupo, Christina M.; Torino, Gina C.; Bucceri, Jennifer M.; Holder, Aisha M. B.; Nadal, Kevin L.; Esquilin, Marta. Racial Microaggressions in Everyday Life: Implications for Clinical Practice. American Psychologist, v62 n4 p271-286 May-Jun 2007.
    • 17. like mosqu ito bites
    • 18. one bite might not hurt that much...
    • 19. but multiple bitescan build over time
    • 20. EXAMPLEA gay man constantly getsasked if he has a girlfriend.
    • 21. What are the hidden assumptions?
    • 22. EXAMPLE A low income studentconstantly gets asked toparticipate in expensive activities.
    • 23. What are the hidden assumptions?
    • 24. We often have a good INTENT but the IMPACTof what we say can have adifferent unintended effect.
    • 25. Some of my bestfriends are... [insert] Cullen, M. (2008). 35 dumb things well-intentioned people say. New York, NY: Morgan James Publishing. (page 63)
    • 26. what’s the INTENT?what’s the IMPACT?what should you doINSTEAD?
    • 27. “Why do [insert] always have to sittogether? They are always sticking together.” Cullen, M. (2008). 35 dumb things well-intentioned people say. New York, NY: Morgan James Publishing. (page 98)
    • 28. what’s the INTENT?what’s the IMPACT?what should you doINSTEAD?
    • 29. OOP S!
    • 30. tepped in it!I s Now what?
    • 31. Now what...• Remember this conversation• Manage your feelings of defensiveness• Listen intently to what happened• Reflect on what you heard• Figure out how to ground yourself so you can hear difficult feedback Special thanks to Stacey Pearson Wharton.
    • 32. Now what 2...• Apologize immediately• Take responsibility• Don’t try to prove your point of view or how much of a ____ist you are not• Share how you can make it different (if possible• Follow up
    • 33. RAWBAT• Define basic terms including power, privilege, and microagression• Identify instances where microagressions may be occurring• Identify the difference between intent and impact when making statements• Describe “rules of thumb” for successfully navigating difficult conversations around difference
    • 34. IV IN G L R E T H E TO GSkills for Engaging in Conversations on Diversity and Social Justice

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