Collabora'ng 
with 
Honors 
Programs 
for 
Successful 
Living 
Learning 
Communi'es 
Paul 
G. 
Brown, 
American 
Universit...
Our Agenda 
• Participants will learn about and discuss the unique 
characteristics and traits of high-achieving and Honor...
Characteristics
Characteristics of High-Ability 
Students 
• Resistant, reluctant, or unable to request help 
• Needing lots of encouragem...
Characteristics of High-Ability 
Students 
• “Doing” what they are good at and not necessarily what 
they are truly intere...
Characteristics of High-Ability 
Students 
• Lack peer support/perceived connections to peers 
• Lack ability to relate to...
What would you add to 
this list?
Understanding your 
collaborators
Understand Student Affairs Work 
Value Student Affairs Work
Understand Student Affairs Work 
Those who 
UNDERSTAND 
student affairs work, 
and 
VALUE it. 
Value Student Affairs Work
Understand Student Affairs Work 
Those who 
UNDERSTAND 
student affairs work, 
and 
VALUE it. 
Those who 
DO NOT 
UNDERSTA...
Understand Student Affairs Work 
Those who 
UNDERSTAND 
student affairs work, 
and 
VALUE it. 
Those who 
DO NOT 
UNDERSTA...
Understand Student Affairs Work 
Those who 
UNDERSTAND 
student affairs work, 
and 
VALUE it. 
Those who 
DO NOT 
UNDERSTA...
Understand Student Affairs Work 
Those who 
UNDERSTAND 
student affairs work, 
and 
VALUE it. 
Those who 
DO NOT 
UNDERSTA...
Understand Student Affairs Work 
Those who 
UNDERSTAND 
student affairs work, 
and 
VALUE it. 
Those who 
DO NOT 
UNDERSTA...
Understand Student Affairs Work 
Those who 
UNDERSTAND 
student affairs work, 
and 
VALUE it. 
Those who 
DO NOT 
UNDERSTA...
Understand Student Affairs Work 
Those who 
UNDERSTAND 
student affairs work, 
and 
VALUE it. 
Those who 
DO NOT 
UNDERSTA...
Understand Student Affairs Work 
Those who 
UNDERSTAND 
student affairs work, 
and 
VALUE it. 
Those who 
DO NOT 
UNDERSTA...
3 “types” of 
honors programs
3 types of honors 
programs... 
• Intimate 
• Full Menu 
• Progressive
Intimate 
• Cohort Size: 20-40 students a year 
• Diversity of cohort plays a larger factor in admission 
• Found at a sma...
Intimate 
Strategies 
• Cohort Size: 20-40 students a year 
• Diversity of cohort plays a larger factor in admission 
• Fo...
Full Menu 
• Cohort Size: 100+ students a year 
• Found at mid and large size universities 
• More routinized and numbers-...
Full Menu 
Strategies 
• Cohort Size: 100+ students a year 
• Found at mid and large size universities 
• More routinized ...
Progressive 
• Cohort Size: varies 
• University Size: varies 
• Focuses on a non-traditional curriculum, may be interdisc...
Progressive 
Strategies 
• Cohort Size: varies 
• University Size: varies 
• Focuses on a non-traditional curriculum, may ...
Summary 
• Who are your students? 
• Who are your collaborators? 
• What type of program is it?
Resources 
• National Collegiate Honors Council 
NCHC (http://www.nchchonors.org/) 
• Journal of the National Collegiate H...
Resources 
• National Academic Advising Association 
NACADA (http:// 
www.nacada.ksu.edu/) 
• Clearinghouse resources
Resources 
• At Your University 
• Know your strategic plan 
• Meet with key constituents 
• Go to Honors Events
Collabora'ng 
with 
Honors 
Programs 
for 
Successful 
Living 
Learning 
Communi'es 
Paul 
G. 
Brown, 
American 
University
Collaborating with Honors Programs for Successful Living Learning Communities
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Collaborating with Honors Programs for Successful Living Learning Communities

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Collaborating with Honors Programs for Successful Living Learning Communities. Association of College and University Housing Officers–International Living Learning Programs Conference, Columbus, OH, October 2009.

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Collaborating with Honors Programs for Successful Living Learning Communities

  1. 1. Collabora'ng with Honors Programs for Successful Living Learning Communi'es Paul G. Brown, American University
  2. 2. Our Agenda • Participants will learn about and discuss the unique characteristics and traits of high-achieving and Honors student populations. • Recognize different approaches to Honors education and how to select the appropriate strategies for collaborating with an Honors Program. • The collaborators • 3 “types” of programs • Participants will be able to call upon resources and ideas for improving Honors-based living learning programs.
  3. 3. Characteristics
  4. 4. Characteristics of High-Ability Students • Resistant, reluctant, or unable to request help • Needing lots of encouragement (in order to maintain top performance or to work at improving performance and/or increasing motivation) • Stretch selves too thin with so many interests and goals; poor time management •Focus on studying too much and therefore miss out on other college life/campus opportunities focus on GPA and not experiencing life
  5. 5. Characteristics of High-Ability Students • “Doing” what they are good at and not necessarily what they are truly interested in • May have known how to “play the game” in high school (e.g., manipulate others, ingratiate or endear selves to teachers, etc.), which won’t necessarily work in college • Enter college on the “fast-track” – already possessing college credits, wanting to enroll in large course load, having unrealistic timelines, etc.
  6. 6. Characteristics of High-Ability Students • Lack peer support/perceived connections to peers • Lack ability to relate to or empathize with others • Difficulty socializing with anyone outside of their “in-group” • Overly demanding with a sense of entitlement
  7. 7. What would you add to this list?
  8. 8. Understanding your collaborators
  9. 9. Understand Student Affairs Work Value Student Affairs Work
  10. 10. Understand Student Affairs Work Those who UNDERSTAND student affairs work, and VALUE it. Value Student Affairs Work
  11. 11. Understand Student Affairs Work Those who UNDERSTAND student affairs work, and VALUE it. Those who DO NOT UNDERSTAND student affairs work, but VALUE it. Value Student Affairs Work
  12. 12. Understand Student Affairs Work Those who UNDERSTAND student affairs work, and VALUE it. Those who DO NOT UNDERSTAND student affairs work, but VALUE it. Those who UNDERSTAND student affairs work, but DO NOT VALUE it. Value Student Affairs Work
  13. 13. Understand Student Affairs Work Those who UNDERSTAND student affairs work, and VALUE it. Those who DO NOT UNDERSTAND student affairs work, but VALUE it. Those who UNDERSTAND student affairs work, but DO NOT VALUE it. Those who DO NOT UNDERSTAND student affairs work, and DO NOT VALUE it. Value Student Affairs Work
  14. 14. Understand Student Affairs Work Those who UNDERSTAND student affairs work, and VALUE it. Those who DO NOT UNDERSTAND student affairs work, but VALUE it. Those who UNDERSTAND student affairs work, but DO NOT VALUE it. Those who DO NOT UNDERSTAND student affairs work, and DO NOT VALUE it. Value Student Affairs Work
  15. 15. Understand Student Affairs Work Those who UNDERSTAND student affairs work, and VALUE it. Those who DO NOT UNDERSTAND student affairs work, but VALUE it. Those who UNDERSTAND student affairs work, but DO NOT VALUE it. Those who DO NOT UNDERSTAND student affairs work, and DO NOT VALUE it. Value Student Affairs Work
  16. 16. Understand Student Affairs Work Those who UNDERSTAND student affairs work, and VALUE it. Those who DO NOT UNDERSTAND student affairs work, but VALUE it. Those who UNDERSTAND student affairs work, but DO NOT VALUE it. Those who DO NOT UNDERSTAND student affairs work, and DO NOT VALUE it. Value Student Affairs Work
  17. 17. Understand Student Affairs Work Those who UNDERSTAND student affairs work, and VALUE it. Those who DO NOT UNDERSTAND student affairs work, but VALUE it. Those who UNDERSTAND student affairs work, but DO NOT VALUE it. Those who DO NOT UNDERSTAND student affairs work, and DO NOT VALUE it. Value Student Affairs Work
  18. 18. Understand Student Affairs Work Those who UNDERSTAND student affairs work, and VALUE it. Those who DO NOT UNDERSTAND student affairs work, but VALUE it. Those who UNDERSTAND student affairs work, but DO NOT VALUE it. Those who DO NOT UNDERSTAND student affairs work, and DO NOT VALUE it. Value Student Affairs Work
  19. 19. 3 “types” of honors programs
  20. 20. 3 types of honors programs... • Intimate • Full Menu • Progressive
  21. 21. Intimate • Cohort Size: 20-40 students a year • Diversity of cohort plays a larger factor in admission • Found at a small liberal arts college • Small and limited honors courses, with a thesis requirement • Started by one person or a small group of dedicated faculty • Director sets “personality” of the program, can be maternalistic/paternalistic • Highly individualized and mentorship-based
  22. 22. Intimate Strategies • Cohort Size: 20-40 students a year • Diversity of cohort plays a larger factor in admission • Found at a small liberal arts college • Small and limited honors courses, with a thesis requirement • Started by one person or a small group of dedicated faculty • Director sets “personality” of the program, can be maternalistic/paternalistic • Highly individualized and mentorship-based • Get to know the students through attending events • Demonstrate ways you can increase diversity • Focus on the same values • Learn the requirements, sit in on classes • Get to know these individuals VERY well and gain their trust • Make the Director your key ally • Provide experiences that are special and emphasize this
  23. 23. Full Menu • Cohort Size: 100+ students a year • Found at mid and large size universities • More routinized and numbers-driven curricular requirements • Offers a range of means of fulfilling honors requirements beyond honors courses: course extensions, specialized research programs, etc. • Enrollment driven • Often tied to an office for prestigious scholarships and fellowships
  24. 24. Full Menu Strategies • Cohort Size: 100+ students a year • Found at mid and large size universities • More routinized and numbers-driven curricular requirements • Offers a range of means of fulfilling honors requirements beyond honors courses: course extensions, specialized research programs, etc. • Enrollment driven • Often tied to an office for prestigious scholarships and fellowships • Be able to accommodate their needs, still provide something “special” • Find ways to make the student experience “smaller” • More routinized and numbers-driven curricular requirements. • Know the requirements and appear knowledgeable • Find ways to enhance and reach University enrollment targets, use the language • Find ways to offer “programs-within-a-program”
  25. 25. Progressive • Cohort Size: varies • University Size: varies • Focuses on a non-traditional curriculum, may be interdisciplinary • Allows students more individualized programs • Offers alternatives to the “thesis-as-capstone” option • Utilizes different and integrative approaches to student learning
  26. 26. Progressive Strategies • Cohort Size: varies • University Size: varies • Focuses on a non-traditional curriculum, may be interdisciplinary • Allows students more individualized programs • Offers alternatives to the “thesis-as-capstone” option • Utilizes different and integrative approaches to student learning • What types of housing/programs do you have that fit with the program? • Know the program’s “niche” in the University and its perceived value • Know the impediments to non-traditional programs at the University • How can your housing/programs enhance this? • Familiarize yourself with the broad range of student work • Know your learning theory, outcomes, and student development
  27. 27. Summary • Who are your students? • Who are your collaborators? • What type of program is it?
  28. 28. Resources • National Collegiate Honors Council NCHC (http://www.nchchonors.org/) • Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council • Honors in Practice • Monographs
  29. 29. Resources • National Academic Advising Association NACADA (http:// www.nacada.ksu.edu/) • Clearinghouse resources
  30. 30. Resources • At Your University • Know your strategic plan • Meet with key constituents • Go to Honors Events
  31. 31. Collabora'ng with Honors Programs for Successful Living Learning Communi'es Paul G. Brown, American University

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