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Soil Degradation In The Developing World With Sound

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Soil degradation in developing countries powerpoint program for AGRON 342

Soil degradation in developing countries powerpoint program for AGRON 342

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  • 1. Soil Degradation in the Developing World Kathleen Cue AGRON 342 November 7, 2008
  • 2. “ Degraded soil means less food. As a result of soil degradation, it is estimated that about 11.9—13.4% of the global agricultural supply has been lost in the past five years.” Chen, et al, 2002
  • 3.  
  • 4. Soil degradation is attributed to:
    • Absence of legume-based rotation
    • Excessive Irrigation
    • Crop residue removal for fodder/biofuels
    • Excessive grazing
    • Manure used for household fuel
    • Excessive use of plow-based tillage
            • The Nature and Properties of Soils, 13 th Edition
  • 5. Further, soil loss is occurring due to erosion and brick making.
            • picasaweb.google.com
  • 6. What are ways to restore productivity to degraded soils?
    • Cover Cropping/Crop Rotation
    • Agroforestry
    • Reduced till/no till
    • Fertilization, both organic and inorganic sources
            • Roose, Barthes (2000)
  • 7.  
  • 8. Benefits of adopting soil Best Management Practices (BMP):
    • Economic—increased yields, less poverty
    • Ethical—reduced hunger, right to eat
    • Social—justice, less unrest, local education
    • Agriculture—sustainable farming
    • Environmental—less erosion, less release of greenhouse gases
  • 9. The End
    • Sources
      • Brady, N.C. and Well, R.R., The Nature and Properties of Soils, 13 th Edition , 2002.
      • Chen, J., Chen J.Z., Tan M.Z., Gong Z., “Soil Degradation: A Global Problem Endangering Sustainable Development”, Volume 12, Num. 2/April 2002, http://www.sprinkgerlink.com/
      • picasaweb.google.com
      • Roose, E. and Barthes, B., “Organic Matter Management for Soil Conservation and Productivity Restoration in Africa: A Contribution from Francophone Research”, http://www.springerlink.com
      • Scherr, S., “Soil Degradation: A Threat to Developing Country Food Security in 2020?” IFPRI, 1999.

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