Syllable Types
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Syllable Types

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explains the 6 syllable types present in the english language

explains the 6 syllable types present in the english language

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    Syllable Types Syllable Types Presentation Transcript

    • SYLLABLES and how they fit together
    • SYLLABLE A syllable is a word or a part of a word with one vowel sound
    • Most words will be a combination of more than one syllable, and/or syllable type
    • Why know the types? When you learn the syllable types, you will also learn the sounds their vowels make. This will help you to sound words out when reading and to make decisions about spelling when you are writing.
    • CLOSED with a consonant ends vowel sound is short Examples: shot, strut
    • OPEN with a vowel ends may be only one letter vowel sound is long Examples: go, I, she
    • SILENT-e with an e Ends has another vowel vowel sound is long Examples: cave, home
    • VOWEL TEAM 2 adjacent vowels or has one vowel that teams with a consonant the pair makes one sound Examples: sail,stay,snow
    • R-CONTROLLED vowel in the combination with an r makes its own unique sound Examples: bird, turn
    • CONSONANT-le comes at the end always of a word has NO vowel sound e is silent Examples: cra/dle, ti/tle