• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Entrepreneurship Course in Second Life®
 

Entrepreneurship Course in Second Life®

on

  • 2,656 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,656
Views on SlideShare
2,622
Embed Views
34

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
24
Comments
1

2 Embeds 34

http://tutkimu.blogspot.com 31
http://www.slideshare.net 3

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

11 of 1 previous next

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Entrepreneurship Course in Second Life® Entrepreneurship Course in Second Life® Presentation Transcript

    • The use of New Technologies in Education: some proposals on  designing an entrepreneurship course using Second Life® University of Coimbra Pedro Nunes' Institute Paula Simões, J.R. De Carvalho, M.Z. Rela IASK – Teaching and Learning 2008 http://flickr.com/photos/ferranrodenas/398064052/
    • Summary ● Changes and new students' profile; ● Second Life examples; ● Entrepreneurship in Second Life; ● The entrepreneurship course; ● The use of technology in each step of the course; ● The actors ● Conclusion
    • Children Keyboard http://flickr.com/photos/spullara/501715356/
    • “Always on the phone” “She's got a blinged out red phone with a camera, internet, and everything.  My own phone isn't even 10% as pimp as this. ” http://flickr.com/photos/tavallai/2084954580/
    • A Student's Backpak: “my laptop, what would I do without it?  I really take it almost everywhere, I use it as mp3 player, movie player,  mobile phone, note pad, address book...” http://flickr.com/photos/gabork/9336784/
    • “The “shape”of the average student is changing, too;  more students are working and commuting than ever  before, and the residential, full­time student is not  necessarily the model for today’s typical student. Higher  education faces competition from the for­profit  educational sector and an increasing demand by  students for instant access and interactive experiences.” In The Horizon Report – 2007 Edition p. 3, available at  http://www.nmc.org/pdf/2007_Horizon_Report.pdf 
    • Second Life ● 3D Virtual World; ● Free account / paid account; ● Avatar(s); ● Residents can own land; ● Residents can build everything they want; ● Linden Dollar based economy.
    • Second Life is about experimentation Using the building and scripting tools in Second Life, she has  created laboratories where students can take part in virtual  experiments that produce analyzable data. In http://flickr.com/photos/jokay/838472666/
    • Second Life is about imersive replicas of  ancient and historical places in http://www.flickr.com/photos/jokay/1158839854/
    • Second Life is about Training “Participants visit six patients, listen to their heart rhythms and make  a diagnosis.” In http://www.flickr.com/photos/jokay/477434313/
    • Second Life is about Visualization “Matt Biddulph was recently contracted by the scientific journal  Nature.com to render gigantic island­sized bacteria so that  scientists can walk around on their own cellular models.” In http://www.flickr.com/photos/jokay/836723731/
    • Second Life is about learning In http://www.flickr.com/photos/jokay/566191221
    • Entrepreneurship in Second Life ● Several examples of people starting their  business in Second Life; ● Contests about the best Business Plan (The  Electric Sheep Company and Eldman); ● Books about the subject (The  Entrepreneurship's Guide to Second Life by  Daniel Terdiman).
    • The Entrepreneurship Course  ­  General Structure ● Idea; ● Team; ● Ethic and Legal Issues; ● Investment; ● Market; ● Business Plan; ● Evaluation.
    • Technologies used ● Second Life – 3D Virtual World; ● Moodle – Learning Management System; ● Sloodle – Communication between Second  Life and Moodle.
    • The Entrepreneurship Course  ­  Structure ● Information/Presentation; ● Information; ● Idea; ● Team; ● Ethic and Legal Issues; ● Investment; ● Market; ● Business Plan; ● Business Creation; ● Evaluation.
    • The course will be designed in  Moodle. Students will have a overall  image of the course.
    • Uses of the chosen technology ● Information/Presentation (Moodle): – Learning Outcome: Information about the course – News forum – students can be notified about meetings in SL and  changes during the course ; – Real time chat (General); – Information about the course – Time structure; learning outcomes;  information about institutions and teachers; ● Introduction (Moodle and Second Life): – Learning Outcome: To Know the technology and  fellow students – Simple tasks to promote knowledge about technology and  socialization – creation of an avatar in SL, profile in Moodle;  presentation in SL and discussion about motivations and  expectations about the course;
    • “The first task of the e­Learning teacher is to develop a  sense of trust and safety within the electronic  community. In the absence of this trust, learners will feel  uncomfortable and constrained in posting their thoughts  and comments.”   In Anderson, T., “Teaching in an Online Learning Context”. Theory and Practice of Online  Learning, ed. Terry Anderson & Fathi Elloumi. Athabasca University, 2004. p. 280 “Having a physical representation of their quot;selvesquot;  through their avatars, whether it looked like them or  looked like something completely different, was quite  important in having them establish relationships with  each other.” In http://ilamont.blogspot.com/2007/05/interview­harvards­rebecca­nesson.html
    • Uses of the chosen technology ● Idea (Second Life, Sloodle and Moodle): – Learning Outcome: To create a business idea – SL: Meetings of brainstorming activity, in context; – Sloodle: export the discussion to Moodle; – Moodle: review of discussions. “In Second Life, that problem of students not participating in class  discussions just totally disappeared. (...) On the flip side, we didn't  have any trouble with students who dominate the discussion.“  In http://ilamont.blogspot.com/2007/05/interview­harvards­rebecca­nesson.html
    • “But as we progressed in the class, it became clear    that running the class in a text­ based environment has a whole  lot of advantages over the face­to­face environment  that I just hadn't anticipated. (...) So for me the idea that I would actually end up  almost preferring to run a class  in a text­based environment to a  voice­based environment, that was a huge surprise.” Rebecca Nesson, professor at Harvard Extension School in  http://ilamont.blogspot.com/2007/05/interview­harvards­rebecca­nesson.html
    • Uses of the chosen technology ● Team (Second Life): – Learning Outcome: how to develop a good  team – SL: Students meetings in order to create their work  teams ● Ethic and Legal Issues (Moodle): – Learning Outcome: to know legal aspects of  creation of a business – Differences between a virtual and a real business
    • Uses of the chosen technology ● Investment (Second Life and Moodle): – Learning Outcome: to learn about types of  investment  and investors – SL: Role­play activities – Training of communication of  students ideas to a potential investor ● Market (Second Life): Learning Outcome: identification of market  – opportunities, marketing strategies  – Access to market studies in SL – Students will be able to run their own market studies in  world
    • Uses of the chosen technology ● Business Plan (Moodle and Second Life): – Learning Outcome: to write the final business  plan – Moodle – Wiki: collaborative writing; – SL: Presentation of the business plan in Second Life to  experts in order to receive feedback;
    • It is easier to bring experts to the classroom http://flickr.com/photos/ialja/495067087/
    • Uses of the chosen technology ● Business Creation (Second Life): – Learning Outcome: create and run a business – Students will create their business in Second Life; – They will have a small grant of Linden Dollars to begin  with; – They can sell and buy objects or services to other  residents  or fellow student; – Students will apply the techniques learned in the  course.
    • Uses of the chosen technology ● Evaluation (Moodle): – Final evaluation of the students' work; – Evaluation of the course by the students, by  questionnaire.
    • The actors ● Students; ● Teachers; ● Software Engineer; ● Instructional Designer / Tutor.
    • Conclusion ● This course is designed according to the new profiles of students that  are emerging, due to the use of technologies; ● Second Life, Moodle and Sloodle are used as tools in specific steps of  the course; ● Second Life is used for discussions, role­play activities and the creation  of the business; ● The use of technology is mandatory: it would not be possible to  benefit from the motivation and practice of creating a business in real  life; ● Moodle is mainly used for documentation and review of the sessions; ● The technology is used according with the learning outcomes  students much achieve.
    • Thank you very much! Ideas? Sugestions? Questions? Paula Simões, J.R. De Carvalho, M.Z. Rela paulasimoes@gmail.com This presentation was made with  OpenOffice Impress (http://www.openoffice.org)  and Gimp (http://www.gimp.org). Images are licensed with  Creative Commons (http://search.creativecommons.org). Second Life and Linden Dollars are trademarks of Linden Research, Inc.