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Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics
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Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics

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Seminar presentation: ‘Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics’ presented at Postgraduate Seminar Series, Victoria University of Wellington, Faculty of Humanity and Social …

Seminar presentation: ‘Meaning and Implications: Women’s participation in Chilean politics’ presented at Postgraduate Seminar Series, Victoria University of Wellington, Faculty of Humanity and Social Science, School of Social and Cultural Studies.

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Transcript

  • 1. Meaning and Implication : Women in politics the Chilean case May 2007 Paula Pereda candidate PhD Victoria University of Wellington
  • 2. Women in politics 2
  • 3. Presentation Structure • Bourdieu’s theoretical framework- key concepts • Chile’s history - women’s history in the public sphere • Applying Bourdieu’s theory to the Chilean case 3
  • 4. Bourdieu’s theory I Reproduction and production of social practices • Symbolic Domination :misrecognition of the relations of domination. • Doxa :natural attitude in a phenomenological sense. • Masculine Domination :embodiment of the masculine order in the form of unconscious schemes of perception and appreciation. • Habitus :system of durable dispositions that produces collective and individual practices and representations. • Strategy : capacity to manoeuvre and improvise
  • 5. Bourdieu’s theory II History Phenomenology Subjectivism Masculine e Order ic ox enc D ri e xp e Embodied schemes of perception and appreciation Bodies Gender Habitus Structuralism Functionalism Objectified sexual divisions Institutions Practices Gendered Practical sense Common sense Objectified sense 5
  • 6. Chilean President Michelle Bachelete 6
  • 7. Women in politics 7
  • 8. History - Pre Pinochet (until 1973) • Women always in public realm • Presence does not disrupt ‘natural social order’ • Example: women’s activism not aimed at extending political but at protecting ‘women’s natural role’. • Never ‘feminist movements’ always ‘feminine’ 8
  • 9. History - Pinochet (from 1973 to 1989) • Pinochet regime actively sought to strengthen women’s traditional roles • Extending public sphere roles • Women active in terms of economic and human rights areas • Developing organisations to face the economic crisis 9
  • 10. Recent history – post-Pinochet from 1989 to 2007 • Women were often key to the democratisation processes • Some increased awareness of gender issues in part due to CEDAW • Further extensions public sphere activity by women • Political expediency in wooing women voters 10
  • 11. Process of democratisation • Structure of the political system legacy from dictatorship period • Recent memory of dictatorship so people want political stability • Complicates bringing women’s issues to the fore 11
  • 12. Why women at the top? • 17 years of ‘democracy’ but little advancement for women Women in work force 36% Women earn 68% as much as men Women in the congress • 5.2% senate • 16% parliament • Suddenly ‘women come to the top’ in politics 2000 onwards under Lagos 2006 elections - President and cabinet 12
  • 13. Why? Back to Bourdieu I Strategy Oriented to maintain power in politics • Coalition needed renew their image • Scandal and corruption in politics • Clean-sweep – space for women to get in • A step towards real democracy and progress • It is NOT a sign of a disruption of gender order 13
  • 14. Why? Back to Bourdieu II Symbolic Power • Symbolic efficacy – Political representation produces and reproduce groups. “Real existence of women” as a group. • Political symbolic domination – ‘women are there representing women’ BUT tokenism; jeopardise coalition and her position; no women’s organisations outside. • Masculine domination – objective gender divisions changing, but cultural system keep gendered cognitive schemes. 14
  • 15. Why? Back to Bourdieu III Production and reproduction of social practises • The paradox of doxa – Naturalisation of masculine order. Reflection on what women’s in politics mean in real terms. • Habitus – Internalizes masculine order, and reproduces it through practices. • Own instruments of representation ‘feminine habitus’ 15
  • 16. From here . . . Work in progress • The big picture of the thesis • Systematic history and structure of society (done today to some extent) • Demographic/statistical overview • Interviews – self-perceptions • Mass media analysis – ‘societal’ perceptions • Understand women in politics in Chile • And contribute to operationalising Bourdieu’s work 16
  • 17. The end

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