Food Miles - Who cares?
Question 1. Which is more sustainable? .V. UK Cox’s Orange Pippin NZ Braeburn
Apples - feedback <ul><li>Recognised eating apples are sprayed much more than cider apples (maybe 30 times), and sprays ha...
Question 2. How can an international brand tackle food miles - and should it?
International Brands - feedback  <ul><li>The question was too simplistic, there are many issues (I would contend the quest...
Question 3. What is the role of local food in the emerging context of climate change and peak oil?
Local food .v. climate change/peak oil <ul><li>Local food is important within climate change </li></ul><ul><li>It depends ...
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Food Miles Workshop Feedback

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Feedback from 'Food Miles - who cares?' workshop facilitated by Richard Heathcote from Bulmers, at ruralnet|2007

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Food Miles Workshop Feedback

  1. 1. Food Miles - Who cares?
  2. 2. Question 1. Which is more sustainable? .V. UK Cox’s Orange Pippin NZ Braeburn
  3. 3. Apples - feedback <ul><li>Recognised eating apples are sprayed much more than cider apples (maybe 30 times), and sprays have big C footprint </li></ul><ul><li>Role of UK apples in providing employment is important as well as food miles </li></ul><ul><li>Most people still buy on price not food miles, hence French Golden Delicious </li></ul><ul><li>Eating apples are only a small part of the economy </li></ul><ul><li>Other roles for local apples inc. not grubbing up, landscape, CO2 absorbing, and resisting development pressures </li></ul><ul><li>Rural issues – apples can and should be very local when in season </li></ul><ul><li>Research suggests out-of-UK-season NZ apples may have lower C footprint as shipping is less C than cold-storage </li></ul><ul><li>Security – we should maintain our industry now for the future and recognise the biodiversity that orchards bring </li></ul><ul><li>Food miles are good starting point, but not the whole answer </li></ul>
  4. 4. Question 2. How can an international brand tackle food miles - and should it?
  5. 5. International Brands - feedback <ul><li>The question was too simplistic, there are many issues (I would contend the question is not to simple, just that a good answer is complex) </li></ul><ul><li>We should recognise the true cost in env. and social terms as well as food miles </li></ul><ul><li>Solution would be consumer choice to increase simplicity, not supported by supermarkets </li></ul><ul><li>Allowing market forces to develop may not be the best way </li></ul><ul><li>International rand are not trusted leaders (I would suggest for most people this is not true, they look to brands for trust) </li></ul><ul><li>Need to sort out who is responsible: consumers, suppliers, developing countries </li></ul><ul><li>I suggested the “internationally local” model developed by BodyShop as a possible way forwards </li></ul>
  6. 6. Question 3. What is the role of local food in the emerging context of climate change and peak oil?
  7. 7. Local food .v. climate change/peak oil <ul><li>Local food is important within climate change </li></ul><ul><li>It depends on energy/carbon budget, not just food miles </li></ul><ul><li>There are social benefits by encouraging a sense of connection </li></ul><ul><li>Local food may restrict choice, but increases feelgood factor </li></ul><ul><li>Some trade in food (e.g. exotic) still desirable </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes less dependency on supermarkets </li></ul><ul><li>Challenge is how to distribute local food cost effectively – there must be a way </li></ul><ul><li>In the future with climate change and peak oil local food has the opportunity for staple diet food as well as high value niche </li></ul><ul><li>Leaky Bucket – can’t remember what this was a reference to - sorry </li></ul>

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