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Paul Cutler Participation Parental Engagement Technology

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Participation, Parental Involvement and Technology - Lessons from the PEAL Project and Beyond

Participation, Parental Involvement and Technology - Lessons from the PEAL Project and Beyond

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  • 1. Participation, Parental Engagement and Technology Learning from the PEAL Project and Beyond Paul Cutler Associate - National Children’s Bureau [email_address]
  • 2. I want to tell you about...
    • The PEAL story - Parents, Early Years and Learning
    • How PEAL has involved parents in their children’s learning and in early years services
    • The role of technology in this
    • Lessons and learning
  • 3. Involvement is about people’s stories
    • “…I never realised how wise she was…”
    • “…it has shown me how to spend more time watching her and listening to her…”
    • “…I noticed Lilly’s love of words…”
    • “… I want to share that I have always been anxious about speaking with parents…”
  • 4. How do we involve parents in their children’s learning? The big question
  • 5. First principles
    • Parents are experts
    • Parents are so important - value them!
    • Relationships are crucial
    • Valuing diversity has to be real and practical
    • Communication
    • It is a highly skilled role
    • Do it together, not to - participation
    • Technology gives us powerful tools
    • EYFS context
  • 6. The PEAL Project - 2006 to 2008
    • 283 individual workshops
    • 113 events
    • 4221 individuals trained
    • Most disadvantaged areas
    • Outreach and consultancy - the outsider perspective
    • Created a network
  • 7. Lifecycle of a project
    • Literature review and research
    • Collecting examples and case studies
    • Creating a training workshop
    • Developing materials
    • Testing
    • Roll out year one
    • Roll out year two
    • And onwards...
  • 8. Reaching out
    • Children’s centres
    • Private and voluntary settings
    • Child minders
    • Local authorities
    • Colleges
    • Partners - NCMA, NDNA, PLA, City & Guilds
  • 9. Evidence base
    • Big studies
    • Small studies
    • Grassroots material - practitioner led, parent led
    • Engagement with the literature
    • Critical reflection
    • Adding to the evidence base
    • Accessing it all online
  • 10. Key Research Messages # 1 Sylva et al, 2004, EPPE
    • ‘What parents do is more important than who they are’
    • ‘The home learning environment gives children an advantage in both social and intellectual development’
    • Home or informal learning ‘stretches a child’s mind’
  • 11. Key Research Messages #2
    • ‘ In the primary age range, the impact on achievement of different levels of parental involvement is bigger than differences associated with variations in the quality of schools’
    • Deforges and Abouchaar, 2003
  • 12. Key Research Messages #3
    • Fathers’ interest and involvement has an independent effect on children. It gives additional benefit to mothers’ interest and involvement’
    • Goldman, 2005
  • 13. Key Research Messages #4
    • What do parents want from partnership?
    • To be listened to
    • Their knowledge of their child valued
    • Confidence enhanced
    • Choices
    • Some control
    • Active partners in problem solving
    • Quinton, 2004
  • 14. What can technology offer to help parents and practitioners achieve this? Key question
  • 15. PEAL sessions
    • What is it like for parents?
    • What do parents want from practitioners?
    • Respectful relationships
    • Why work with parents?
    • What might stop us?
    • Communication and confidence
    • What needs to be in place?
  • 16. Inspirations from Pen Green
    • Innovative uses of technology
    • Involvement and participation from the first step
    • Scale of the involvement
    • Parents as the camera person - passing on control and power
    • Getting absorbed in the observations
    • Linking to schemas and other models
  • 17. What stops parental involvement?
    • Time pressures
    • Parents journeys
    • Past experiences - often negative
    • Perceptions
    • Small details = big barriers
    • First impressions and welcomes
    • Access
  • 18. Technology helps with
    • Communication - 2-way
    • Conversations - keep them going
    • Observations
    • Capturing
    • Recording
    • Storing - memory and reflection
    • Comparing
    • Stories
    • Editing and personalising
    • Insight
    • Celebrating
  • 19. Types of technology
    • Mobile phones
    • SMS
    • DVD and video
    • Digital photography
    • Music, mp3 and podcasts
    • Email
    • Websites - Flickr, Facebook
    • Other social media - wikis, forums, blogs
    • Others
  • 20. Examples
    • Sharing observations
    • Stop, Look and Listen - Margaret Carr
    • Treasureboxes
    • Story sacks
    • Video and DVD
    • Photo books
    • PEAL forum, comment pages
    • Science museum and library trips - local, free
    • Web based dissemination
    • Electronic documents - case studies, reports
  • 21. Fathers and technology
    • Do men like gadgets? Discuss
    • Personal invitations
    • Multiple forms of contact
    • Picture messages
    • Including dad in feedback / communication
    • Valuing different types of involvement and learning
    • Asking for feedback - beware gender assumptions
  • 22. Technology and diversity
    • Access
    • Language
    • Networks
    • Disability groups
    • Using a range of tools
    • Introduce at people’s own pace
    • Get feedback
  • 23. Key lessons - getting it right
    • Be prepared to loan and share technology
    • Be prepared to take risks
    • Be prepared to build trust
    • Build staff confidence
    • Build on existing strengths
    • Avoid jargon
    • Learn from other settings - network
    • Focus on the learning and the relationship
    • Make it fun
  • 24. Barriers
    • If I tell you the truth…
    • Word on the street
    • Will I let you down?
    • Why are we doing this?
    • I didn’t know - getting information
    • Missing the point - technology as a facilitator
  • 25. Future opportunities - who changes?
    • Find the amazing stuff that is out there
    • Institutionalise involvement and participation in settings - forums and beyond
    • Get out in to the real world
    • Focus on the power of parents and children’s learning
    • Develop the networks and information
  • 26. Useful links
    • PEAL www.peal.org.uk
    • PEAL online forum www.peal.org.uk/forum
    • Participation tools www.participationworks.org.uk
    • Byron Review www.dfes.gov.uk/byronreview
  • 27. About me
    • Pauldcutler@gmail.com
    • www.stronger-and-more-effective.co.uk
    • Blog at www.publicaction.org.uk
    • Twittering at http://twitter.com/paulcutler
  • 28. References
    • Desforges, C. and Abouchaar, A. (2003) The Impact of Parental Involvement, Parental Support and Family Education: A Literature Review , Research Report 433. London: DfES
    • Goldman, R. (2005) Fathers’ Involvement in their Children’s Education . London: NFPI
    • Quinton, D. (2004) Supporting Parents: Messages from Research . London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers
    • Sylva, K., Melhuish, E., Sammons, P. and Melhuish, E. (2004) The Effective Provision of Pre-School Education (EPPE) Project: Final Report . London: DfES
    • Wheeler, H. and Connor, J. (2006) Parents, Early Years and Learning: Reader . London: NCB

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