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Exploring & Adventuring
 

Exploring & Adventuring

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Colossians 1:19-24 - Presentation about exploring God's Word and what that produces in our life

Colossians 1:19-24 - Presentation about exploring God's Word and what that produces in our life

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    Exploring & Adventuring Exploring & Adventuring Presentation Transcript

    • Exploring & Adventuring Col. 1:9-12
    • Paul’s Prayer…
      • That you would be filled with the knowledge of God’s will…
    • What is that?
      • “ The correct and thorough knowledge of what God wishes, has commanded or desires to be done”
    • What will that produce?
      • The correct and thorough knowledge of what God wishes, has commanded or desires to be done
      • will produce…
      • A walk worthy of the Lord
      • In linguistics , a participle (adjective participial, from Latin participium , a calque of Greek μετοχη "partaking") is a derivative of a non-finite verb , which can be used in compound tenses or voices , or as a modifier . Participles often share properties with other parts of speech, in particular adjectives and nouns .
      What is a Present Participle? English verbs have two participles: called variously the present , active , imperfect , or progressive participle , it is identical in form to the gerund ; the term present participle is sometimes used to include the gerund. The term gerund-participle is also used. called variously the past , passive , or perfect participle , it is usually identical to the verb's preterite (past tense) form, though in irregular verbs the two usually differ. The present participle in English is in the active voice and is used for: forming the progressive aspect : Jim was sleeping . modifying a noun as an adjective: Let sleeping dogs lie. modifying a verb or sentence in clauses: Broadly speaking , the project was successful. As noun-modifiers, participles usually precede the noun (like adjectives ), but in many cases they can or must follow it: The visiting dignitaries devoured the baked apples. Please bring all the documents required . The difficulties encountered were nearly insurmountable. The present participle in English has the same form as the gerund , but the gerund acts as a noun rather than a verb or a modifier. The word sleeping in Your job description does not include sleeping is a gerund and not a present participle.
      • In linguistics , a participle (adjective participial, from Latin participium , a calque of Greek μετοχη "partaking") is a derivative of a non-finite verb , which can be used in compound tenses or voices , or as a modifier . Participles often share properties with other parts of speech, in particular adjectives and nouns .
      What is a Present Participle? English verbs have two participles: called variously the present , active , imperfect , or progressive participle , it is identical in form to the gerund ; the term present participle is sometimes used to include the gerund. The term gerund-participle is also used. called variously the past , passive , or perfect participle , it is usually identical to the verb's preterite (past tense) form, though in irregular verbs the two usually differ. The present participle in English is in the active voice and is used for: forming the progressive aspect : Jim was sleeping . modifying a noun as an adjective: Let sleeping dogs lie. modifying a verb or sentence in clauses: Broadly speaking , the project was successful. As noun-modifiers, participles usually precede the noun (like adjectives ), but in many cases they can or must follow it: The visiting dignitaries devoured the baked apples. Please bring all the documents required . The difficulties encountered were nearly insurmountable. The present participle in English has the same form as the gerund , but the gerund acts as a noun rather than a verb or a modifier. The word sleeping in Your job description does not include sleeping is a gerund and not a present participle. An “ing” word…
      • Bearing Fruit
      καρποφορου̂ντες
    • αὐξανόμενοι Continuously Growing
    • δυναμούμενοι Powering up
    • εὐχαριστου̂ντες Constant thanksgiving
    •