Energy

1,901 views
1,908 views

Published on

Common Core Science Support Standards Addressed (8th grade):
8.P.2.1 – Explain the environmental consequences of the various methods of obtaining, transforming and distributing energy.
8.P.2.2 – Explain the implications of the depletion of renewable and nonrenewable energy resources and the importance of conservation.

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
1 Comment
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,901
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
665
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
79
Comments
1
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Image Description:
    Powerpoint
    Teaching Tips:
    Ask students :How have you used energy this morning? Walking, running, playing, turning on the light, turning on the toaster…
    Discuss the fact there are many forms of energy, but this is a focus on electrical energy and the provision of power.
  • Image Description:
    Powerpoint
    Teaching Tips:
    Ask students :How have you used energy this morning? Walking, running, playing, turning on the light, turning on the toaster…
    Discuss the fact there are many forms of energy, but this is a focus on electrical energy and the provision of power.
  • Image Description:
    Burning coal
    Teaching Tips: Ask: What is your source of energy for physical energy?
    Food/ water…
    What is our source of electricity? Most of our electricity in Australia comes from coal fired power stations. Why?
  • Image description:
    Coal seam central Queensland
    Teacher Tips: Ask: What is non-renewable energy?
    Background notes:
    A non-renewable resource is:
    A natural resource, such as coal, natural gas and crude oil
    A resource which takes thousands or millions of years to form naturally and cannot be replaced once it has been used
    A resource which has high carbon content because it was formed from the buried remains of plants and animals that lived millions of years ago. The fuels, once combusted then release this carbon back into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide.
  • Teaching Tip: Background Notes:
    The burning of natural gas to generate electricity does release greenhouse gases. These are fewer greenhouse gas emissions than the burning of coal or diesel oil. Gas structures around the world contain widely varying proportions of carbon dioxide (CO2). It is estimated that the burning of natural gas emits around 30 to 50 per cent less carbon dioxide than coal and oil, as well as less sulphur dioxide.
  • Teaching Tip: Brainstorm advantages and disadvantages
    Title:
    Positives
    Description of image:
    Picture showing yearly fuel of NPP.
    Ask:
    Discuss:
    Teacher notes:
    Nuclear power stations, unlike coal, do not produce sulphur dioxide and carbon dioxide.
    For more information:
    http://www.uic.com.au/
    Activity:
  • Title:
    Negatives
    Description of image:
    Ask:
    Discuss:
    Teacher notes:
    Many people are concerned about the safety of nuclear power and what can be done with toxic waste.
    On 26 April 1986, at 1:23:44, reactor no. 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power station exploded. One hundred times more radiation was released than by the atom bombs dropped over Hiroshima and Nagasaki. © Chernobyl Interinform
    For more information:
    Go to the Uranium Information site at http://www.uic.com.au/
    Activity:
  • Teaching Tip: Background Notes:
    It is non-renewable and fast depleting
    Burning it releases carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, that had been stored in the earth for millions of years
    Mining oil can impact on the environment; sea and land
    Oil spills can occur from oil rigs and tankers
    The cost of oil is driven by supply and demand.
  • Image Description:
    Solar panels
    Teacher Tips: Ask ‘What is renewable energy?’ ‘What are some examples?’
    Background notes:
    Renewable energy refers to:
    Sources of energy that are continually being renewed
    Energy that is unlikely to run out.
    Energy types that include solar energy, hydropower, wind, waves and tides.
  • Image Description:
    Solar 2 project in USA. This image is a work of a United States Department of Energy in the public domain wikipedia site http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Solar_two.jpg
    Teacher Tip: Brainstorm the advantages of solar energy.
  • Image Description:
    Wind farm
    Teaching Tip: Background Notes:
    Wind energy is the kinetic energy contained in the movement of a mass of air molecules.
    The wind can be used to turn a turbine, which can then produce electricity using a generator.
    Many wind turbines are relatively small, and large numbers are required to produce appreciable amounts of energy. Certain areas of the country are particular suitable for wind turbines.
    The blades of these wind turbines are about 30 metres long. Wind turbines are collected together in wind farms.
  • Teaching Tip: Brainstorm advantages and disadvantages
  • Title:
    Negatives
    Description of image:
    Ask:
    Discuss:
    Teacher notes:
    Many people are concerned about the safety of nuclear power and what can be done with toxic waste.
    On 26 April 1986, at 1:23:44, reactor no. 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power station exploded. One hundred times more radiation was released than by the atom bombs dropped over Hiroshima and Nagasaki. © Chernobyl Interinform
    For more information:
    Go to the Uranium Information site at http://www.uic.com.au/
    Activity:
  • Energy

    1. 1. ENERGY
    2. 2. Energy Energy is the mysterious force that travels through the universe making things happen. The scientific definition is the ability to do work.
    3. 3. Types of Energy There are many types of energy, in fact new types are still being discovered from time to time. The main ones we understand today are:  Electromagnetic  Thermal  Mechanical  Chemical  Electrical  Nuclear
    4. 4. Electromagnetic
    5. 5. Thermal  Thermal energy is the total energy of all of the molecules in a substance.  Temperature is the measure of thermal energy!
    6. 6. Mechanical  Mechanical energy is the energy of motion.  Potential energy is the energy a body has from its position and kinetic energy is the energy it has when it is actually in motion.
    7. 7. Chemical  Chemical energy is released when chemical bonds are broken and reformed. i.e. during a chemical reaction
    8. 8. Electrical  Electrical energy is energy created by moving electrical charges.  It travels through wires and we use it…a lot!
    9. 9. Nuclear  Protons and neutrons in an atom’s nucleus are held there by nuclear forces.  When these forces are overcome and neutrons and/or protons are removed from an atom nuclear energy is released.
    10. 10. Energy Transformations Just like the other main component of the universe, matter, energy is also conserved. Energy can be neither created nor destroyed. It does, however, get transformed from one form of energy to another all the time.
    11. 11. How does electricity come from the sun?
    12. 12. Energy Use How do we humans use energy?
    13. 13. Transportation
    14. 14. Electricity Where does our electricity come from? From Duke Energy/Progress: 58,200 megawatts of generating capacity from a diverse mix of coal, nuclear, natural gas, oil and renewable resources
    15. 15. NON-RENEWABLE Non-renewable resources cannot be replenished at the rate at which they are being used. Also referred to as fossil fuels because they were created by the Earth over millions of years from decomposing organisms. Examples:  Coal  Petroleum  Natural Gas  Nuclear
    16. 16. Advantages of Coal Coal provides:  Jobs  Income from exports (US holds majority of the world’s reserves)  Taxes to government used in essential services including schools, hospitals, roads and police  cheap & reliable infrastructure
    17. 17. Disadvantages of Coal  It is non-renewable!  Mining creates environmental & human problems  On combustion, emits air pollutants such as carbon dioxide, and nitrogen oxides  Creates waste in the form of ash which needs to be stored  Uses large amounts of water in the electricity generation process
    18. 18. Natural Gas Plant
    19. 19. Advantages of Natural Gas      Produces half the greenhouse gas emissions of coal and oil Has a high heating value Is accessible from a number of areas Can be transported easily by pipes to homes and businesses Can be used as a source of hydrogen energy
    20. 20. Disadvantages of Natural Gas    It is non-renewable! On combustion produces greenhouse gases; mainly carbon dioxide Costs involved in exploration, infrastructure e.g. plants and pipelines
    21. 21. 1. In a nuclear reactor, fuel rods full of uranium pellets are placed in water. 2. Inside the fuel rods, uranium atoms split, releasing energy. 3. This energy heats water, creating steam. 4. The steam moves through a turbine, which turns a generator to create electricity. 5. The steam cools back into water, which can then be used over again. At some nuclear power plants, extra heat is released from a cooling tower.
    22. 22. Advantages of Nuclear Yearly fuel of a nuclear power plant (NPP) • Uses lesser amount of uranium compared with coal for the same energy output. • No CO2 emissions
    23. 23. Disadvantages of Nuclear • • • • • It is non-renewable! Nuclear waste - can be toxic for 1000’s of years Storage locations - NIMBY Possible use in nuclear weapons – “Dirty bombs” Possible accidental radiation release - Fukushima
    24. 24. Petroleum – Crude Oil
    25. 25. Advantages of Petroleum Combusts (burns) easily  Has a high heating value  Relatively easy to transport  Can be made into a variety of useful products 
    26. 26. Disadvantages of Petroleum    It is non-renewable! Combustion of oil produces greenhouse gases Sources of oil are becoming more difficult to find  Cost of oil can be high  Political & human problems – WAR!
    27. 27. Environmental Impact
    28. 28. Non-Renewable Resources are Finite Folks!
    29. 29. RENEWABLE ENERGY Source of energy that will not run out! Examples:  Solar  Wind  Hydroelectric  Geothermal Courtesy of Ergon Energy
    30. 30. 1. Sunlight hits the surface of the photovoltaic cell. • A material called a semi-conductor converts the light into electricity.
    31. 31. 1. Mirrors or reflectors concentrate the sun's rays to heat a special kind of liquid. 2. The heat from this liquid boils water to create steam. 3. Steam spins a turbine that is connected to a generator, which creates electricity. 4. The steam cools and condenses back to water, which is recycled, reheated, and converted into steam again.
    32. 32. Advantages of Solar • Renewable! • Limited CO2 emissions • The source of energy (sun) is free! • Costs associated with solar are going down as cost of fossil fuels are going up Source: United States Department of Energy
    33. 33. Disadvantages of Solar • Cost of power is high • Technology is expensive • Not always sunny (not reliable) • Equipment can be damaged in storms etc • Dust etc can impact effectiveness
    34. 34. 1. As the wind blows over the blades of a wind turbine, it causes the blades to lift and rotate. 2. The rotating blades turn a shaft that is connected to a generator. 3. The generator creates electricity as it turns.
    35. 35. Advantages of Wind  Renewable energy from the wind has been used for centuries to power windmills to mill wheat or pump water  It is free other than the cost to produce & maintain the equipment  No emissions except in the production of equipment
    36. 36. Disadvantages of Wind Unpredictable wind speeds  Can be unsightly depending on where they are located  Impacts on habitat (especially for birds & bats)  Noise & shadows 
    37. 37. 1. Flowing water turns a water wheel or turbine. 2. A generator attached to the turbine produces electricity.
    38. 38. Advantages of Hydroelectric • Renewable form of energy • Limited CO2 emissions except in construction of equipment & if coal fired power is used to pump water back up to a higher dam
    39. 39. Disadvantages of Hydroelectric • A suitable site is not always near where energy is being used • The building of large dams floods large areas and causes damage to existing habitats (for humans & wildlife) • Changing the flow of a river can affect the water supply to other areas
    40. 40. Three Gorges Dam in China
    41. 41. 1. Hot water is pumped from deep underground through a well under high pressure. 2. When the water reaches the surface, the pressure is dropped, which causes the water to turn into steam. 3. The steam spins a turbine, which is connected to a generator that produces electricity. 4. The steam cools off in a cooling tower and condenses back to water. 5. The cooled water is pumped back into the Earth to begin the process again.
    42. 42. 1. Water or a refrigerant moves through a loop of pipes. 2. When the weather is cold, the water or refrigerant heats up as it travels through the part of the loop that's buried underground. 3. Once it gets back above ground, the warmed water or refrigerant transfers heat into the building. 4. The water or refrigerant cools down after its heat is transferred. It is pumped back underground where it heats up once more, starting the process again. 5. On a hot day, the system can run in reverse. The water or refrigerant cools the building and then is pumped underground where extra heat is transferred to the ground around the pipes.
    43. 43. Advantages of Geothermal Renewable!  Less expensive  Becoming more and more accessible with new technology 
    44. 44. Disadvantages of Geothermal  Earth’s crust must be thin  Hot rocks and water must be close to earth’s surface. Sometimes hot water pumped to the surface contains pollutants (stinky sulfur)  Location restricted: Must be at convergence of tectonic plates. 

    ×