First Impressions Training (FIT) Professional Business Etiquette workshop 2011
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

First Impressions Training (FIT) Professional Business Etiquette workshop 2011

  • 5,429 views
Uploaded on

Professional Business Etiquette builds business and careers. Business people know the importance of proper etiquette.

Professional Business Etiquette builds business and careers. Business people know the importance of proper etiquette.

More in: Education , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
5,429
On Slideshare
5,427
From Embeds
2
Number of Embeds
2

Actions

Shares
Downloads
631
Comments
1
Likes
3

Embeds 2

http://www.linkedin.com 1
https://blackboard.bsu.edu 1

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Pattie McNiel presents Professional Business Etiquette College of Veterinary Medicine Michigan State University April 8, 2011 Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 2. First Impressions Training Phone: (517) 918-9318 E-mail: [email_address]
    • Professional Business Etiquette
    • Professional etiquette builds leadership, quality, business and careers. Etiquette refines skills needed for exceptional service. Whether you are a seasoned executive or just starting out, a seminar in professional etiquette will enhance your image.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 3. Definition
    • The forms, manners, and ceremonies established by convention as acceptable or required in social relations, in a profession, or in official life.
    • Webster’s New World Dictionary
    • Think about it…as business becomes increasingly global, your ability to know whether to kiss, bow, or shake someone’s hand is crucial.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 4. Etiquette Changes as Society Changes
    • Youth Rebellion of the 60’s (gas was 34 cents a gallon in 1968)
    • The Civil Rights Movement
    • The Vietnam War
    • War on Poverty
    • Assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy
    • Impact of Drugs
    • Divorce Rate & Single Parent families
    • Restless Mobility of Modern America
    • Time Pressured Lives have Splintered many Traditions
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 5. First Impressions: When you walk into a room, walk with purpose.
    • You are yourself and your company. Your very first impression is crucial, always put your best foot forward. First impressions are made for the most part, within 5 seconds of meeting someone. That doesn’t get you past the “How do you do?”
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 6. Is this professional dress? Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 7. In Fact,
    • Words only account for 7% of an initial impression. Vocal quality accounts for another 38%. A whopping 55% of any first impression is based on non-verbal perceptions of appearance and behavior.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 8. Introductions:
    • When meeting someone, shake their hand firmly, look directly into their eyes, and say their name in your mind three times.
    • The most important point about introductions is to make them. Failing to do so causes embarrassment and discomfort.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 9. Tricks for memorizing names at the office
    • Do you repeat it? Repeat the person’s name not only in your head but out load.
    • Can you use it in the conversation? Repetition can really help so it’s a good idea to repeat the name throughout your conversation.
    • Can you connect the name to something? You might see a guy named Dan and think of a big fan.
    • Do you write it down? I always try to ask someone for a business card and then jot down something about them to help me remember our conversation.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 10. Business Introductions:
    • In business, introductions are based on power and hierarchy. Simply, persons of lesser authority are introduced to persons of greater authority.
    • Gender plays no role in business etiquette; nor does it affect the order of introductions.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 11. Example:
    • “ Mr./Ms. Greater Authority, I would like to introduce Mr./Ms. Lesser Authority.”
    • However, the person holding the highest rank may not be Mr./Ms. Greater Authority. A client, for instance, always takes precedence over anyone in your organization, as does an elected official.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 12. The Business Card
    • The business card, like the Chinese, look at it for a few moments and then place it away.
    • Remember presence-be there with the person you are speaking with.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 13. Breaking Into A Crowd
    • Be cheerful, complimentary and confident.
    • Positive body language is essential.
    • Look for the common denominator.
    • Everyone has a common bond, use it to help conversation begin to flow.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 14. Make a Connection:
    • Don’t be afraid to reach out your hand to a stranger with a smile on your face and introduce yourself-what do you have to lose?
    • Ask open ended questions and allow others to talk about themselves. You may be amazed with how easy the conversation will begin to flow.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 15. Proper Topics of Conversation
    • Name some topics that should not be discussed in a business setting
    • Religion
    • Sex
    • Politics
    • Diet
    • So, what should we talk about?
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 16. Networking
    • The key purpose of a reception in addition to allow time for gathering, is for networking.
    • Always have your business card
    • Meet as many people as possible
    • Use this time to your advantage
    • The more contacts you have the easier it is to do business
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 17. Alcohol Consumption
    • Be Careful
    • Pacing is important. Switch off beverages with alcohol and non-alcoholic options. Remember, never allow yourself to have too much to drink, it is never a positive reflection on you.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 18. HORS D’OEUVRES
    • Buffet: This is where there are many stations throughout the room. Be careful not to have a plate in one hand and a beverage in another. You then do not have an open hand for a proper introduction.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 19. Passed: Butler Style
    • The best for a business reception, the servers mingle throughout the room with silver trays of hors d’oeuvres. You should take one appetizer and place it on your napkin.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 20. Here’s How To Do It Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 21. Follow the lead of the Host
    • Host: you are to lead your guests through the dining experience. Your guests will follow your lead. You will order the wine and you should open up the menu options, as a host you will order last.
    • Guests: you will follow the hosts lead. Do not remove your napkin before the host does. You will not set the pace for this dining experience. You will not order alcoholic beverages unless the host has made it clear that it is all right to do so.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 22. Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT) Pattie McNiel 93 Agate Way Williamston, MI 48895 P: (517) 918-9318 Email: [email_address] Website: www.firstimpressionstraining.com
  • 23. Type of Service
    • American : Plated service traditional in American Restaurant service from left with left hand. French : Food is finished tableside-service is right with right hand Russian : Plate presentation-plates set at first service from the left with right hand. English : Family Style-Items always passed counter clockwise.
    • Note: Always offer the person on your left, then pass to the right.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 24. Bread Service:
    • Your bread and butter
    • plate may be used
    • for sharing.
    • Break your bread over your bread and butter plate. Butter and consume bread one morsel at a time.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 25. Water Service
    • Water is an after thought and the goblet is set the furthest away for you
    • Champagne
    • White Wine
    • Red Wine
    • Dessert Wine
    • Always set in the order in which it will be served
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 26. Silverware-Proper Use of Utensils:
    • There should be no more than three implements of each type of silverware. If additional are needed, they will be brought out with each respective course.
    • Work from the outside in
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 27. Continental Dining Vs. American Dining
    • Continental: The fork is in the left hand, tines down, the knife is used often to guide food into the tines of the fork. A very graceful way of dining.
    • American : The zig-zag method. We eat with our fork in our right hand. We cut our food and then place the knife back onto the plate and switch the fork from our left to right hand.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 28. Keep pace with everyone at the table. Resting or Finished Eating?
    • Resting: knife at 11/4 and fork at 8/2
    • When finished with the course place the knife blade in and the fork (closer to you) diagonally across the plate (between 10 and 4 o’clock.)
    • Keep your soup spoon in the soup cup or bowl while eating, when finished place soup spoon to the right on the plate liner.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 29. Wine Service
    • Cork
    • Swirl
    • Smell
    • Legs
    • Taste
    • Only return a bad bottle of wine
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 30. International Business Etiquette
    • Business Etiquette in China : The business card exchange is an important part of the initial meeting and greeting.
    • Business Etiquette in Ireland : Business attire should be modest and comprised of conservative colors rather than bold ones.
    • Business Etiquette in Spain : You should go the extra mile and have your business card translated into Spanish on the reverse side.
    • Business Etiquette in Russia : Business life in Russia is formal and hierarchies play an important role in internal relations and decision-making.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 31. The Basics of Good Guesting
    • Respond to an invitation, either by phone, letter, or e-mail within 24 hours.
    • Cancel if you’re ill or have a cold.
    • Arrive punctually.
    • Be positive and upbeat.
    • Don’t bring children or pets unless they were specifically included in the invitation.
    • Always send a thank you note.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 32. Cell Phones, Pagers & Beepers
    • Please!
    • Always, turn off or mute cell phones, pagers & beepers in church, meetings and restaurants.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 33. CUSTOMER SERVICE TIPS
    • A WARM, SINCERE GREETING
    • BUILD RAPPORT
    • FIND OUT THE CUSTOMERS NEEDS
    • EXCEED EXPECTATIONS
    • THANK YOUR CUSTOMER FOR THEIR BUSINESS
    • ALWAYS INVITE THEM BACK FOR REPEAT BUSINESS
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 34. Top 10 Pet Peeves
    • Slurping or smacking noises while eating
    • Private conversations during a meeting
    • Talking on a cell phone in a meeting or restaurant
    • Unsolicited jokes, photos over the Internet
    • Interrupt before others have finished talking
    • People who do not cover their mouths when coughing, sneezing or yawning
    • Eating before everyone at their table has been served
    • Picking teeth with fingers or toothpick at the table
    • People who do not acknowledge a gift with a thank you note
    • People who pile a plate full of food and don‘t leave enough for others
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 35. Etiquette tip of the day:
    • In today’s fast paced business environment, we sometimes forget the basics of professionalism.
    • Remember that being a good neighbor is just as important on the job as it is at home.
    • Exhibiting courtesy, tact, and empathy in the workplace will help you build productive relationships and camaraderie with colleagues.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 36. Questions
    • The single highest cost in most organizations is…..people.
    • The single most valuable asset any company has is…..people.
    • All executive plans are carried out by…..people.
    • I help build professional people who in turn build successful organizations.
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)
  • 37. Etiquette Odds and Ends
    • Hard to eat foods
    Copyright © Pattie McNiel First Impressions Training (FIT)