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P3DM & PV :"It takes a village"
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P3DM & PV :"It takes a village"

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Telecho, Ethiopia 2010, CTA/ MELCA Mahiber …

Telecho, Ethiopia 2010, CTA/ MELCA Mahiber
Photography and edition Patricia Santos

Published in: Education, Technology

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  • Promotion of Collaborative Spatial Information Management and Communication in East and Southern Africa
  • covering 672 Km 2
  • : 2.8m x 2.4m
  • Music by Mulatu Astatke and The Heliocentrics - Masenqo
  • Transcript

    • 1. PARTICIPATORY THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELLING
    • 2. Photo report of a P3DM exercise and training organised by CTA & MELCA Ethiopia, December 2010 It Takes a Village
    • 3. “ Promotion of Collaborative Spatial Information Management and Communication in East and Southern Africa”
    • 4. Telecho, Oromyia Ethiopia - 2010
    • 5.  
    • 6. Here, in Oromyia, Ethiopia, livelihoods are mainly dependent on agriculture
    • 7. Deforestation is increasingly becoming a problem
    • 8. And signs of severe soil erosion and land degradation are evident
    • 9. In this context CTA and MELCA organised this PGIS/P3DM/PV exercise, to support local communities and train development practitioners from six African countries PGIS: Participatory GIS P3DM: Participatory 3D Modelling PV: Participatory Video
    • 10. A P3DM process should happen only where the groundwork has been done at community level IMPORTANT
    • 11. From a base map the contour lines are scaled up to 1:10.000 m IN PRACTICE
    • 12. The contour lines are then traced…
    • 13. … on card sheets of 3mm, which have been cut to size
    • 14. The card sheets are cropped…
    • 15. … glued and nailed together
    • 16. Then layer after layer of card are used…
    • 17. … to create the slope of the 3D model
    • 18. Slowly it becomes possible to identify specific features from a birds-eye view
    • 19. Meanwhile, the elders were invited to discuss the map legend eliciting local knowledge
    • 20. Clear and detailed legend preparation is crucial for the success of the P3DM process
    • 21. When the construction phase is completed…
    • 22. … the achievement of the group is celebrated
    • 23. The trainees, the local students and facilitators, everyone participates in the celebrations!
    • 24. The model is then covered with soft white paper
    • 25. To smooth the slope and prepare the model for painting
    • 26. After three days of work the “blank” model is ready
    • 27. The next day the first group of villagers arrives and has its first contact with the 3D model
    • 28. From the water courses villagers start to identify features on the model
    • 29. Location of areas, points and lines are discussed and agreed upon
    • 30. Each group, coming from a different locations, provides guidance to the next group
    • 31. Each group, from the 28 participating villages, needs to fully understand the legend
    • 32. P3DM allows time and space for interaction
    • 33. It is a process of continuous knowledge sharing
    • 34. It creates a platform for knowledge sharing, among and across generations
    • 35. Interaction and knowledge exchange promote social learning
    • 36. The P3DM process results in a celebration of community-based action ...
    • 37. ... where the value of local knowledge is recognised
    • 38. The model becomes the repository of geo-referenced information documenting local knowledge
    • 39. The data on the model are extracted using digital photography for import into a GIS
    • 40. P3DM was coupled with other tools for promoting participatory learning and action
    • 41. Such as the ‘Democracy Wall’ which elicits reflection and sharing of ideas
    • 42. The process included ‘Participatory Video’ for building capacity in communication © Giacomo Rambaldi
    • 43. And to add power to local voices and broaden knowledge exchange
    • 44. On the top of several months of preparation, it took 10 days to manufacture the model and inputs from 130 villagers, 14 students and 20 trainees
    • 45. The manufacture of the model started from a planimetric map…
    • 46. We used 3 mm carton boards, glue, nails, paint
    • 47. Pins, wool thread, and other materials
    • 48. And this created a platform for people to meet, interact…
    • 49. Learn, discuss, decide and take action
    • 50. The community built a 3D model of their bio-physical and cultural landscapes,
    • 51. Reflected on past, present and future,
    • 52. ... and on new perspectives for future resource management
    • 53. While practicing P3DM what counts the most is the process rather than the output
    • 54. P3DM promotes social learning and stimulates community-based initiatives
    • 55.  
    • 56. Inauguration Day
    • 57. National, regional and local, government and non-government actors attended the event
    • 58. Together with local communities
    • 59. The P3DM model was unveiled ...
    • 60. Presented by local villagers ...
    • 61. Michael Hailu, Director of CTA Million Belay, Director of MELCA © Giacomo Rambaldi Acknowledged ...
    • 62. Admired ...
    • 63. And finally entrusted to the local community
    • 64. © Giacomo Rambaldi
    • 65. For further information on P3DM: Participatory 3-Dimensional Modelling:   Guiding Principles and Applications
    • 66. For further information on projects: pgis.cta.int & MELCA-ethiopia.org
    • 67. Photographs and editing by Patricia Santos 2011 Music by Orchestra Ethiopia Tigrigna

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