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Dalton and lavoisier

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Their contributions to science history.

Their contributions to science history.

Published in: Technology, Business

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  • 1. Dalton and Lavoisier
    A New Dawn for Chemistry:
  • 2. Conservation of mass and atomic theory
    Dalton – Atomic Theory
    Lavoisier – Conservation of Mass
  • 3. John Dalton’s new Atomic Theory
    Lavoisier’s Conservation of mass
  • 4. Atomic Theory - 1
    The atoms of a given element are different from those of any other element; the atoms of different elements can be distinguished from one another by their respective relative atomic weights.
  • 5. Atomic theory - 2
    All atoms of a given element are identical.
    Carbon Atoms
  • 6. Atomic theory - 3
    Atoms of one element can combine with atoms of other elements to form chemical compounds; a given compound always has the same relative numbers of types of atoms.
  • 7. Atomic theory - 4
    Atoms cannot be created, divided into smaller particles, nor destroyed in the chemical process; a chemical reaction simply changes the way atoms are grouped together.
    Based on Lavoisier’s Law of Conservation of Mass
  • 8. Atomic theory - 5
    Elements are made of tiny particles called atoms.
    Atom – from the Greek word “atmos,” meaning “indivisible”
  • 9. Video 9:09 – 33:23
    http://teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=130153
  • 10. Credits
    http://www.innovacorporate.com/Activated_Carbon_Powder_&_Granular.htm
    http://ircamera.as.arizona.edu/NatSci102/NatSci102/lectures/spectroscopy.htm
    http://www.3dchem.com/moremolecules.asp?ID=234&othername=dihydrogen%20monoxide
    http://teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=130153&title=Developing_Atomic_Concepts

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