Metabolic Surgery
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Metabolic Surgery

on

  • 1,906 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,906
Views on SlideShare
1,906
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
100
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Metabolic Surgery Metabolic Surgery Presentation Transcript

  • Metabolic Surgery  (Diabetes Surgery) Stacy Brethauer, MD  Staff Surgeon Endocrinology and Metabolism Institute  www.ccf.org/bariatricsurgery 
  • Objectives •  Brief overview of Bariatric Surgery •  What is Metabolic Surgery? •  What is the evidence to support diabetes  surgery? •  What are the current and future clinical  applications of metabolic and diabetes  surgery?
  • Within 5 years, will  gastrointestinal surgery be considered an acceptable option  for the treatment of Type 2  Diabetes in the non­obese  patient?
  • Historical Perspective Jejunoileal Bypass  Vertical Banded Gastroplasty  (JIB) (VBG) 
  • Bariatric Procedures Performed Today Laparoscopic Adjustable  Roux­en­Y Gastric  Gastric Band  Bypass
  • Early Postoperative  Risks of Laparoscopic  Gastric Bypass •  Conversion to Open  < 5% •  Bleeding  0 ­ 5% •  Wound infection  0 ­ 5% •  Anastomotic Leak  1 ­ 4% •  DVT  0 ­ 1.5% •  PE  0 – 1.3%
  • Risks of Lap Banding •  Bleeding  < 1% •  Infection  < 1% •  Perforation  < 0.5% •  DVT / PE  0.1% •  Erosion  < 1% •  Band Slip / Prolapse  5 – 10% •  Port or Tubing problem  <5%
  • Mortality after Lap Banding •  Review of international literature  Mortality rate of 0.05%  (Chapman AE, Kiroff G, Game P, et al.   Surgery 2004;  135(3):326­51.)
  • Gastric Bypass Postoperative  Mortality •  Study of 60,077 Californians undergoing  gastric bypass between 1995 and 2004  found 30­day mortality of 0.33% •  54,878  patients from 2001 National  Inpatient Sample had 0.4% mortality
  • Gastric Bypass Postoperative  Mortality •  AHRQ Bariatric Surgery Utilization and  Outcomes in 1998 and 2004 (Healthcare Cost and  Utilization Project Brief # 122) •  Nine­fold increase in procedures during six year  period •  National inpatient death rated associated with  bariatric surgery declined by 78% •  From 0.89% in 1998 to 0.19% in 2004
  • Bariatric Surgery  A Systematic Review and Meta­analysis •  Excess Weight Loss  –  All Patients:  61.2% (58.1%­64.4%)  –  Gastric Banding  47.5% (40.7%­54.2%)  –  Gastric bypass  61.6% (56.7%­66.5%)  –  Gastroplasty  68.2% (61.5%­74.8%)  –  BPD/DS  70.1% (66.3%­73.9%) •  Operative mortality ( 30 days)  –  Restrictive procedures  0.1%  –  Gastric bypass  0.5%  –  BPD/DS  1.1%  –  Buchwald et al. JAMA. 2004;292:1724­1737
  • Metabolic Syndrome
  • Metabolic Syndrome  •  Abdominal obesity  waist circumference > 102 cm men,  >88 cm women  •  Fasting blood glucose > 110 mg/dl  •  Hypertriglyceridemia > 150 mg/dl  •  Low HDL­cholesterol (<40 mg/dl men,  < 50 mg/dl women)  •  Hypertension (> 130/ >85)  54 million Americans!
  • The expanded Metabolic Syndrome  OSA  Type 2  Hypertension  diabetes  Insulin Resistance  Central Obesity NASH  PCOS  Dyslipidemia 
  • How Would You Manage This Patient?  •  Obesity  •  Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis  •  Hypertension  (NASH)  •  Dyslipidemia  •  Obstructive sleep apnea  •  Type 2 Diabetes  •  Left ventricular hypertrophy
  • Comorbidity Resolution  According to Procedure  Gastric  Gastroplasty  Gastric  BPD or DS  Total  Banding  Bypass EWL  47%  68%  62%  70%  61% Mortality  0.1%  0.5%  1.1%  NR Resolution of DM  48%  72%  84%  99%  77% Resolution of  59%  74%  97%  99%  79%  Hyperlipidemia Resolution of  43%  69%  68%  83%  62%  Hypertension Resolution of Sleep  95%  78%  80%  92%  86%  Apnea  Buchwald et al. JAMA. 2004;292:1724­1737
  • Comorbidity Resolution  According to Procedure  Gastric  Gastroplasty  Gastric  BPD or DS  Total  Banding  Bypass EWL  47%  68%  62%  70%  61% Mortality  0.1%  0.5%  1.1%  NR Resolution of DM  48%  72%  84%  99%  77% Resolution of  59%  74%  97%  99%  79%  Hyperlipidemia Resolution of  43%  69%  68%  83%  62%  Hypertension Resolution of Sleep  95%  78%  80%  92%  86%  Apnea  Buchwald et al. JAMA. 2004;292:1724­1737
  • Comorbidity Resolution  According to Procedure  Gastric  Gastroplasty  Gastric  BPD or DS  Total  Banding  Bypass EWL  47%  68%  62%  70%  61% Mortality  0.1%  0.5%  1.1%  NR Resolution of DM  48%  72%  84%  99%  77% Resolution of  59%  74%  97%  99%  79%  Hyperlipidemia Resolution of  43%  69%  68%  83%  62%  Hypertension Resolution of Sleep  95%  78%  80%  92%  86%  Apnea  Buchwald et al. JAMA. 2004;292:1724­1737
  • Comorbidity Resolution  According to Procedure  Gastric  Gastroplasty  Gastric  BPD or DS  Total  Banding  Bypass EWL  47%  68%  62%  70%  61% Mortality  0.1%  0.5%  1.1%  NR Resolution of DM  48%  72%  84%  99%  77% Resolution of  59%  74%  97%  99%  79%  Hyperlipidemia Resolution of  43%  69%  68%  83%  62%  Hypertension Resolution of Sleep  95%  78%  80%  92%  86%  Apnea  Buchwald et al. JAMA. 2004;292:1724­1737
  • Non­alcoholic fatty liver  disease (NAFLD)
  • Number of patients 70 Age (in years)  47 + 9 Male sex (%)  34 (44%) ASA Class    2:  23%  3:  49%  4:  28%  nd Time interval to 2  biopsy (months)  14.5 + 9 
  • Inflammation  45  P =<0.001  40  35  30 n 25  20  1st Bx  15  2nd Bx  10  5  0  0  1  2  3  4  Score 
  • Pre­ and Post­operative clinical characteristics of patients (=70)  Pre­operative  Post­operative  p value Weight (lbs)  339.1± 72.2  235.5 ± 66.8  <0.001  2 BMI (kg/m )  56.0 ± 10.6  38.5 ± 10.3  <0.001 Systolic blood pressure (mm Hg)  134 ± 15  124 ± 14  <0.001 Diastolic blood pressure (mm Hg)  79 ± 9  75 ± 11  0.006 Plasma glucose (mg/dl)  138.5 ± 55.0  98.3 ± 24.6  <0.001 HbA1c (%)  7.69 ± 1.68  5.91 ± 1.11  <0.001 Total cholesterol (mg/dl)  201.4 ± 47.5  173.2 ± 39.3  <0.001 Triglycerides (mg/dl)  170.7 ± 82.8  109.9 ± 51.4  <0.001 HDL­C (mg/dl)  44.8 ± 11.5  47 ± 13.1  0.04 LDL­C (mg/dl)  121 ± 41.9  108.1 ± 35.0  0.005 AST (IU/l)  30.9 ± 17.9  24.2 ± 11.1  0.003 ALT (IU/l)  37.3 ± 19.0  32.7 ± 19.1  0.06 Albumin (g/dl)  3.87 ± 0.31  3.81 ± 0.36  0.19 Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation and n (%)
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome
  • Before and After Bariatric Surgery
  • Metabolic Surgery •  Treatment of metabolic derangements with  alterations of the gut anatomy •  Emphasis off weight loss and on the  improvement of metabolic conditions  resulting from these interventions,  particularly the remission of diabetes
  • Gastrointestinal Metabolic Surgery Francesco Rubino, MD  Director of the Diabetes Surgery Center  Chief, Gastrointestinal Metabolic Surgery  NewYork­Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center With the section of Gastrointestinal Metabolic Surgery headed by Francesco Rubino, MD, a pioneer in the field of diabetes surgery, NewYork­Presbyterial Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, has become the first academic medical center in U.S. and worldwide to offer a dedicated and highly specialized approach to surgical treatment of type 2 diabetes.
  • What is the Evidence to Support the Concept of Diabetes Surgery?
  • Rates of Remission of Diabetes  Adjustable  Roux­en­Y  Biliopancreatic Gastric Banding  Gastric Bypass  Diversion  48%  84%  >95%  (Slow)  (Immediate) (Immediate) 
  • DISCOVERY OF GASTROINTESTINAL HORMONES  Rehfeld J, 2004 J, 2004 
  • Mechanisms of Diabetes Resolution  after Gastrointestinal Bypass  Surgery 1. Enhanced secretion of  something good  for glucose homeostasis ?  or or 2. Reduced production of  something bad  for glucose homeostasis ? 
  • Mechanisms of diabetes control after RYGB Distal  bowel hypothesis bowel hypothesis Nutrients reach the distal ileum  within 5 min of the ingestion of food and this stimulates the secretion of GLP­1 by L­cells secretion of GLP  1 by L  ­  ­ located in this area  Mason E.  Obes Surg 2005 15, 459­461  Mason E.  Obes Surg 2005 15, 459  ­ 
  • Mechanisms of Surgical Treatment of T2D Proximal bowel hypothesis bowel hypothesis The exclusion of the duodenal nutrient passage may offset an abnormality of gastrointestinal physiology responsible for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes 
  • Is there an increase in anorectic  peptides if the distal gut is given  greater exposure to nutrients? Strader et al. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 2005
  • Strader et al. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab  2005  •  IT rats had less food  intake  •  IT rats lost more  weight
  • Strader et al. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab  2005  •  IT rats had 3x higher  GLP­1 levels than  controls  •  No difference in GTT  •  IT rats were more  insulin­sensitive than  sham
  • Strader et al. Am J Physiol Endocrinol  Metab 2005  IT rats had increased  PYY levels
  • Strader et al. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab  2005 •  Suggests that procedures that promote  gastrointestinal endocrine function (GLP­1,  PYY) can reduce energy intake
  • Biliopancreatic diversion in rats is associated with intestinal hypertrophy and with increased GLP­1, GLP­  2 and PYY levels.  Borg CM, le Roux CW, Ghatei MA, Bloom SR, Patel AG.  Obes Surg. 2007 Sep;17(9):1193­8. •  Increased PYY, GLP­1, GLP­2, small bowel  mucosal mitotic activity in BPD rats compared  to shams.
  • Gut hormones as mediators of appetite and weight loss after  Roux­en­Y gastric bypass.  le Roux CW, Welbourn R, Werling M, et al.  Ann Surg. 2007 Nov;246(5):780­5. – Correlated peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon­like  peptide 1 (GLP­1) changes within the first week  after gastric bypass with changes in appetite  •  Postprandial PYY and GLP­1 profiles start rising as  early as 2 days after gastric bypass (P < 0.05).  •  Changes in appetite are evident within days after gastric  bypass surgery (P < 0.05), and unlike other operations,  the reduced appetite continues.
  • Mechanisms of recovery from type 2 diabetes after  malabsorptive bariatric surgery.  Guidone C, Manco M, Valera­Mora E, et al.  Diabetes. 2006 Jul;55(7):2025­31.  Links –  10 diabetic morbidly obese subjects before and shortly after  biliopancreatic diversion (BPD)  •  Insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and circulating levels of  intestinal incretins and adipocytokines were studied  •  Diabetes disappeared 1 week after BPD, while insulin sensitivity at  1 week and 4 weeks was fully normalized.  •  Fasting insulin secretion rate and total insulin output  dramatically  decreased, while a significant improvement in beta­cell glucose  sensitivity was observed.  •  Both fasting and glucose­stimulated gastrointestinal polypeptide  decreased, while glucagon­like peptide 1 significantly increased.
  • •  13 BMI­matched controls •  10 Lap Band patients 2 yrs post­op •  13 RYGB patients 2 yrs post­op •  All subjects non­diabetic •  474 ml Optifast with blood draw at 30, 60, 90,  120, 180 minutes
  • January 2004January 2004 
  • Goto­Kakizaki Rat (GK)  Goto  ­ Animal model of type 2  diabetes  –  The most­widely used  The most  ­  lean model in type 2  diabetes research  (Nature Genet 1996)  (  Nature Genet 1996  •  Non­obese  Non ­  •  Normolipidemic  •  Hyperinsulinism  •  Insulin resistance Insulin resistance 
  • Duodenal­Jejunal Bypass (DJB)Duodenal  Jejunal Bypass (DJB)  ­ 
  • Results Results  OGTT  (DJB RATS)  450  400  350  300  Preop  250 mg/dl  1 week p.o.  200  150  100  50  42% reduction of AUC (P<0.001)  0  Baseline  10 min  30 min  60 min  120 min  180 min  P=0.001 
  • Results Results  OGTT 450 400 350  Diet 300 250  Bypass 200  Sham 150 100  50  0  Baseline  10 min  30 min  60 min  120 min  180 min  P<0.001 
  • DJB in non­diabetic rats  OGTT Wistar rats  W Sham  130  120  110  100  90  80  70  60  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  180  Time ( min) Annals of Surgery Nov 2006Annals of Surgery Nov 2006 
  • DJB in non­diabetic rats  OGTT Wistar rats  W DJB  W Sham  160  140  120  100  80  P=0.02  60  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  180  Time ( min) Annals of Surgery Nov 2006Annals of Surgery Nov 2006 
  • Is GI Bypass Surgery Fixing What is Broken ?Fixing What is Broken ? 
  • November 2006November 2006 
  • Early Ileal Stimulation  Gastro­jejunal Anastomosis  Gastro  ­ Annals of Surgery Nov 2006Annals of Surgery Nov 2006 
  • Sham  +  PF to DJB  (GJA)  DJB Annals of Surgery Nov 2006Annals of Surgery Nov 2006 
  • Oral Glucose Tolerance  OGTT GK rats  GK Sham  600 G lu c o s e  le v e ls  (m g /d l)  500  400  300  200  100  0  Time (min)  0  50  100  150  200 Annals of Surgery Nov 2006Annals of Surgery Nov 2006 
  • Oral Glucose Tolerance  OGTT GK rats  GK DJB  GK Sham  600 G lu c o s e  le v e ls  (m g /d l)  500  400  300  200  100  0  Time (min)  0  50  100  150  200 Annals of Surgery Nov 2006Annals of Surgery Nov 2006 
  • Oral Glucose Tolerance  OGTT GK rats  GK DJB  GK Sham  GK GJ  600 G lu c o s e  le v e ls  (m g /d l)  500  400  300  200  100  0  Time (min)  0  50  100  150  200 Annals of Surgery Nov 2006Annals of Surgery Nov 2006 
  • Duodenal Exclusion Annals of Surgery Nov 2006Annals of Surgery Nov 2006 
  • OGTT after Duodenal Exclusion  OGTT  AUC 69000 64000 59000  Duodenal Pass.  Duod. Exclus 54000 49000 44000  Duodenal Pass.  Duod. Exclus  P<0.05 Annals of Surgery Nov 2006Annals of Surgery Nov 2006 
  • Restoration of Duodenal Passage  AUC OGTT X 2 Annals of Surgery Nov 2006Annals of Surgery Nov 2006 
  • Conclusion  Exclusion of the proximal small bowel from the flow of  nutrients is the primary mediator of diabetes resolution  after DJB Annals of Surgery Nov 2006Annals of Surgery Nov 2006 
  • Hypothesis  Altered gut signaling in response  to duodenal passage of nutrients  may impair glucose homeostasis  in diabetic subjects
  • METHODS Intraluminal Duodenal SleeveIntraluminal Duodenal Sleeve 
  • Controls: Fenestrated Duodenal SleeveControls: Fenestrated Duodenal Sleeve 
  • Complete SleeveComplete Sleeve 
  • Fenestrated SleeveFenestrated Sleeve 
  • OGTT: Complete Tube  P< 0.01 P< 0.01 
  • OGTT  AUC: P< 0.01 AUC: P< 0.01 
  • Pre­study 600 500 400 300  Pre­study200 100  0  BASE  10 min  30 min  60 min  90 min  120 min  180 min 
  • Postop complete intraluminal tube 600 500 400  Pre­study 300  Post sleeve200 100  0  BASE  10 min  30 min  60 min  90 min  120 min  180 min 
  • 9th day pop with lac. 600 500 400  Pre­study 300  Post op  2 day post lac200 100  0  BASE  10 min  30 min  60 min  90 min  120 min  180 min 
  • 600 500 400  Pre­study  9th pop tube 300  2nd post lac  9th post lac200 100  0  BASE  10 min  30 min  60 min  90 min  120 min  180 min 
  • Conclusions These findings in rats support the hypothesis that a dysfunction of the duodenum may contribute to the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes of type 2 diabetes 
  • UNITED NATIONS RESOLUTION “240 million people worldwide are living with diabetes;  380 million by 2025”  “It kills one person every 10 seconds”
  • Obesity and Diabetes Prevalence  14  India Urban  12 Diabetes Rate (%) Greece  10  Kuwait  Italy  Saudi Arabia  Bahrain  USA  India (total)  8  Turkey  Japan  6  Australia  Korea  Peru  France  Germany  Hungary  4  England  Switzerland  Finland  China  Netherlands  2  Laos  0  0  5  10  15  20  25  30  35  40  Obesity Rate (%) 
  • Diabetes Surgery Is BMI an adequate criteria to define indication to surgical  treatment of diabetes ? Diabetes­Specific Interventions ?
  • TYPE 2 DIABETES Surgical Therapy ?
  • Diabetes Therapy: Surgery? Journal Title  Who would have thought it? An operation  proves to be the most effective therapy for adult­  onset diabetes mellitus Authors  Pories WJ, Swanson MS, MacDonald KG, et al Y;vol:pp  1995;222:339­350 Key point  Surgery is more effective than medical therapy  in treating diabetes  83% of type 2 diabetic subjects euglycaemic
  • 851 bariatric surgery patients 852 matched controls 10 year follow­up Significant reduction in incidence of diabetes in surgery group   (7% v. 24%, p< 0.001) at 10 years
  • 7,925 Gastric Bypass Patients 7,925 controls matched for age, sex, BMI Mean follow­up 7.1 years Primary outcome was death from any cause
  • Adams et al. •  40% reduction in all­cause mortality •  56% reduction in cardiovascular mortality •  56% reduction in cancer mortality •  90% reduction in diabetes­related mortality
  • Recent Developments:  Standard procedures in lower BMI  patients New procedures in obese and non­obese  diabetic patients
  • Omentectomy •Vanderbilt University  Primary endpoints  HOMA  Pre­OP  2.28  3 Month  1.86  p value  • n=10 omentectomy  Men  Women  2.4  2.13  1.6  2.22  0.08  0.74  HbA1c  7.6  7.1  • 5 men  Men  8.4  6.7  0.22  Women  6.9  7.5  0.32  • 5 women  Secondary Endpoints  Pre­OP  3 Month  p value  TG  243  191  Men  234  158  0.03  Women  253  223  0.19  Chol  210  182  Men  214  169  0.016  Women  205  195  0.39  HDL  43  40  Men  40.4  38.6  0.4  Women  46.2  40.8  0.07  LDL  121  110  Men  136  109  0.17  Women  108  109  0.92 Richards et.al. unpublished
  • Treatment of Mild to Moderate Obesity with Laparoscopic  Adjustable  Gastric Banding or an Intensive Medical Program  A Randomized Trial  Paul E. O’Brien, MD; John B. Dixon, et al.  Ann Int Med. 2006;144:625­633  •  BMI 30­35  •  VLCD, Pharmocotherapy, lifestyle modification vs.  Lap Band  •  2 year follow­up  •  87% vs. 22% EWL  •  24% vs. 3% resolution of metabolic syndrome
  • Adjustable Gastric Banding and  Conventional Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes  A Randomized Controlled Trial John B. Dixon, MBBS, PhD, Paul E. O’Brien, MD, et al.  JAMA.  2008; 299(3)  2  ­BMI 30 – 40 kg/m  ­N = 60 (BMI = 37, HbA1c = 7.8)  ­ Best Medical Therapy   vs.  Best Medical Therapy  plus  Lap  Band  ­2 year follow­up  ­62.5% vs. 4.3% EWL  ­73% vs. 13% remission of diabetes
  • Laparoscopic Roux­en­Y gastric bypass for  BMI 35 kg/m2: a tailored approach Ricardo Cohen, M.D.*, Jose S. Pinheiro, M.D., Jose L. Correa, M.D.,Carlos A.  Schiavon, M.D.  Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases 2 (2006) 401–404  •  37 patients  •  Diabetics on two oral meds  •  81% EWL at two years  •  All patients had normalization of FBG off meds
  • Duodeno­Jejunal Bypass (DJB)•  “First in Man” Duodenal Jejunal Bypass  9  3  8  0 HbA  (%)  2  BMI (kg/m2)  7  9  1c  2  6  8  5  2  7  4  2  0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  6  0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  Time Post Surgery (month)  Time Post Surgery (month)  R Cohen et.al SOARD, 2007 
  • Ileal Interposition •  Ileal Transposition +/­ Sleeve Gastrectomy  – Physiologic Basis:  = Increase of GLP1 and  distal gut peptides  – Highlights  •  3 GI anastomosis  •  Scant worldwide experience
  • Duodenal­Jejunal Bypass Sleeve •  12 patients •  60 cm DJBS placed endoscopically •  23% excess weight loss  at 12 weeks •  All 4 diabetic patients had normal fasting glucose  levels off medication during DJBS therapy
  • STAMPEDE  Surgical Therapy And Medications Potentially  Eradicate Diabetes EfficientlyPhilip Schauer, MD ­ Bariatric & Metabolic Institute Sangeeta Kashyap, MD ­ Endocrinology Stacy Brethauer, MD – Bariatric & Metabolic Institute Deepak Bhatt, MD – Cardiology, C5 
  • STAMPEDE  Study Summary •  Patient population  2  –  T2DM (HbA1c > 7.5%) / BMI 30 – 40 kg/m •  Objective – assess effects on glycemic control  –  Advanced medical therapy alone  –  Combined bariatric surgery / medical therapy •  Primary endpoint  –  Biochemical resolution of DM @ 12 mo HbA1c <  6% •  Sample size  –  150 pts randomized to 1 of 3 arms •  Follow­up 5 years
  • Conclusions •  Gastrointestinal bypass procedures can improve  diabetes by mechanisms beyond changes in food  intake and body weight •  Anatomic modification of various regions of the GI  tract likely contribute to the amelioration of T2DM  through distinct physiological mechanisms. •  Gastric bypass and Adjustable Gastric Banding  provide effective, durable therapy for all the  components of the metabolic syndrome (through  different mechanisms) •  Surgical therapy for Type 2 diabetes is highly  effective in patients with severe and mild obesity
  • Thank You