BSG guidelines in Pancreatology

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  • 1. Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland Pancreatic Section of the BSG The Summer Meeting of the Joint Committee of the Pancreatic Society and the Pancreatic Section of the BSG will be held in Edinburgh International Conference Centre The Soutra Room Edinburgh, at 4pm on Monday 4th Sept, 2006 Agenda(1)Apologies,Simon Bramhall, Steve Pereira, David Criddle,(2) Present:(3) Minutes of the last meeting – (20th March, 2006, Birmingham - encl.)(4) Matters ArisingPancreatic Society Annual Scientific Meeting – see appendix AMeeting updateSession chairsSelection of papersProposals for the Pancreatic Section symposium 2007 - see appendix BPancreatic Society Accounts (AD)AwardsAmelie Waring FellowshipSmall research grantsTravel fellowship / grants / Travel BursariesFunding by Specialist Commissioners for APPancreatic Society website / logoMerit award nomination system /Clinical excellence awardsHonorary membershipCommittee representationPancreatology Editorial Committee (Richard Charnley)Information Technology (Mike Larvin)Research (Robert Sutton)Action: RS to provide details of the November meeting for the websiteAudit (Mark Deakin)EUS ()AUGIS liver pancreatic group ()Please reply to: Mr Ross Carter, Lister Dept of Pancreaticobiliary Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow, G31 2ER Tel: 00 44 141 211 5129 Fax: 00 44 141 552 3229 e-mail: rcarter@clinmed.gla.ac.uk
  • 2. Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland Pancreatic Section of the BSGCNS report(CS)BSG guidelines in Pancreatology chronic pancreatitis rolling programme of revisionJoint Alpine meeting with the liver surgeonsLinks with PancreaticcancerUK and Pancreatic Supporters networkFederation of Gastroenterological Societies(Proposal from Kel Palmer – Appendix D)Any Other BusinessDate of next meetingThursday 9th November, 2006 (5.30pm)Slaley Hall Country House Hotel, NorthumberlandPlease reply to: Mr Ross Carter, Lister Dept of Pancreaticobiliary Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow, G31 2ER Tel: 00 44 141 211 5129 Fax: 00 44 141 552 3229 e-mail: rcarter@clinmed.gla.ac.uk
  • 3. Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland Pancreatic Section of the BSGAppendix A Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland Annual meeting 2006 Provisional programmeThursday 9th November, 200610.00 – 11.00 Registration and Coffee11.00 - 12.30 Symposium: Managing the Difficult Pancreatic PatientManaging recurrent acute pancreatitis Dr Alistair Makin (Manchester)When does pancreatitis become chronic pancreatitis? Dr Steve Pereira (London)The difficult diagnosis of pancreatic cancer Dr Kofi Oppong (Newcastle)12.30 - 14.00 Lunch, Posters and Trade Exhibition14.00 - 15.30 Symposium: Pancreatic CancerPancreatic Cancer and the population Prof David Forman (Leeds)Novel treatments for Pancreatic Cancer Dr Gary Middleton (Guildford)Defining fitness in pancreatic surgery Dr Chris Snowden (Newcastle)15.30 - 16.00 Coffee, Posters and Trade Exhibition16.00 - 16.45 International Guest Lecture:Timing of Surgery for Pancreatic Cancer Prof. Jakob Izbicki (Hamburg)16.45 – 17.30 Debate: All pancreatic cystic tumours should be resected Proposed by Mr Ashley Dennison (Leicester) Opposed by Professor Kevin Conlon (Dublin)19.30 for 20.00 31st Annual Dinner of the Pancreatic SocietyFRIDAY 10th November, 200608.30 - 10.15 Free Papers10.15 - 10.45 Coffee, Posters and Trade Exhibition10.45 - 11.30 International Guest Lecture: Surgery for Chronic Pancreatitis - Prof. Jakob Izbicki (Hamburg)11.30 – 12.45 Free Papers12.45 - 13.45 Lunch, Posters and Trade Exhibition13.45 – 14.15 Poster session14.15 – 14.45 Trials Updates and New Developments14.45 – 15.30 International Guest Lecture: The Molecular Basis of Acute Pancreatitis - Prof Stephen Pandol (UCLA)15.30 – 16.00 Annual General Meeting and Award of Rodney Smith Prize, Poster Prize and Travel Bursaries16.00 Close of meetingPlease reply to: Mr Ross Carter, Lister Dept of Pancreaticobiliary Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow, G31 2ER Tel: 00 44 141 211 5129 Fax: 00 44 141 552 3229 e-mail: rcarter@clinmed.gla.ac.uk
  • 4. Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland Pancreatic Section of the BSGProposals for the Section symposium 2007 1.30: Plenary presentation (I understand that John deCaestecker is involved in organising this, and Im uncertain as to the extent of input required from me. Suggest that this is not necessarily devoted to AIP. Please advise..) 2.00-2.30: Free papers 2.30-4.00 Autoimmune Pancreatitis 2.30-3.00: Historical perspective, Epidemiology and clinical presentation: Robert Sutton 3.00-3.30: Investigation and Diagnostic criteria: Suresh Chari or Michael Levy (from Mayo) 3.30-4.00: Treatment approaches and disease response: George Webster Each talk 20-25 minutes, with 5 minutes discussion. I think that 2 speakers from the States is probably not justified, and certainly feel that the Mayo group are pushing the subject harder than most, with new, clinically useful, diagnostic criteria. Robert S has written editorial in Gut emphasising that this is not just a Japanese disease, and is keen to talk, and may be quite useful to have a historical view (ie used to be an excuse for surgeons to operate, but no longer!!).SECC,Glasgow 26-27th March, 2007 ( abstract deadline 31st October, 2006)Please reply to: Mr Ross Carter, Lister Dept of Pancreaticobiliary Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow, G31 2ER Tel: 00 44 141 211 5129 Fax: 00 44 141 552 3229 e-mail: rcarter@clinmed.gla.ac.uk
  • 5. Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland Pancreatic Section of the BSGAppendix C Travel Bursaries International Travel Bursaries for trainees in Pancreatology (up to £500)(1)Name of applicant: Vincent YipApplication for international travel bursary for trainees in PancreatologyTitle of abstract:Changes in the systemic innate immune response in two experimental models of severe acutepancreatitis)I am one of the members of the Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland. I submitted theabove abstract to Digestive Disease Week 2006 in October 2005. It was accepted for presentationin DDW 2006, Los Angeles Convention Centre between 20th to 25th May 2006. Please findthe content of the accepted abstract along with this email.(2)Name of applicant: Nagammapudur S BalajiTitle of abstract:PRECUT FISTULOTOMY cannulation in ERCP-An equally safe technique of cannulation of the common bile duct in difficult access situations.N S Balaji, Moorthy K, Durkin D, Cheruvu CVN, Deakin MName of meeting where abstract accepted:7th World Congress of the International Hepato-Pancreato Biliary Association - Edinburgh -September 2006 International Travel Fellowship for trainees in Pancreatology (up to £3000)Cris Pollard Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic Nurse SpecialistLocationThe Hepatobiliary ServiceThe Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer CentreManhattan’s Upper East Side1275 York AvenueBetween 67th and 68th StreetsManhattanNew York USAReason for visitThe Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre (MSKCC) has a world-wide reputation as a centreof excellence for the management and treatment of patients with hepatobiliary and pancreatic(HPB) cancers. It accepts patients from all over the USA but in particular the Eastern Seaboard(with a catchment area of approximately 130 million people).We work as HPB Nurse Specialists within the HPB unit at the (University Hospitals of LeicesterNHS Trust) Leicester General Hospital. Our HPB unit in Leicester has a growing reputation as atertiary referral centre for patients with HPB disorders and serves a population of approximately3.5 million people mainly from East Midlands.Please reply to: Mr Ross Carter, Lister Dept of Pancreaticobiliary Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow, G31 2ER Tel: 00 44 141 211 5129 Fax: 00 44 141 552 3229 e-mail: rcarter@clinmed.gla.ac.uk
  • 6. Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland Pancreatic Section of the BSGAppendix DFederation of Gastroenterological Societies(letter from Kel Palmer – President elect of the BSG) The Pancreatic Society and a Federation of Gastroenterology and HepatologyDear AndrewFor my sins I have been appointed President of the British Society of Gastroenterology, taking upthis role in March 2008. I guess Presidents should have some sort of vision, and what follows isan aspiration that I hope you might share.In the mid twentieth century academic aspects of British medical and surgical gastroenterologywere largely represented by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). Two annual meetingspresented a wide range of research and ‘Gut’ published papers relating to luminalgastroenterology, liver disease and gastrointestinal surgery. As sub-specialisation developedsplinter groups evolved and these have matured into thriving, successful and independentsocieties. The Pancreatic Society has clearly been a very successful example of this and hasbecome the major player within the sub-specialty. There are others; AUGIS, ACPGBI, BASL ( theBritish society for the study of liver disease), BAPEN (nutrition), BSGAR (gastrointestinalradiologists) and the British Association of Paediatric Gastroenterology (BAPGN) are examples. These developments are by no means surprising; the specialist has difficulty enough keeping upwithin his own field and has little need to engage elsewhere. Time is precious; meetings must befocused, relevant and well supported by the key players. Furthermore concentration of expertsgenerates influence; a Royal College, the Pharmaceutical Industry and the Government are likelyto engage with a highly focused group when addressing a highly focused issue. Thus sub-specialist societies have developed in response to changes in medical practice and research, theywill thrive and more will develop.These changes are therefore welcomed, but there are downsides; 1. The generalist; whether he is a medical gastroenterologist dealing with luminal gastroenterology as well as liver disease or the surgeon who has a need to keep abreast with the totality of abdominal surgery has difficulties. Time prevents attendance at multiple meetings and the quality of the ‘general’ meeting suffers because the experts only attend their specialist society and the best research presentations are reserved for these meetings. 2. Trainees have similar issues. A SpR in medical gastroenterology needs exposure to luminal gastroenterology, hepatology, pancreatic disease, nutrition and surgery. The trainee in colo-rectal surgery has to be aware of developments in inflammatory bowel disease, nutrition and endoscopy. Attendance at multiple meetings is impossible and accepting that a minority of trainees will differentiate into super-specialists, it is surely necessary to expose our trainees to as much of our specialties as possible during these formative years. 3. Societies have influence; BASL may have played a role in changing government attitudes to alcohol consumption, ACPGBI and AUGIS have promoted specialisation in cancer surgery, the BSG has (through JAG and with the modernisation agency) improved standards of endoscopy. On the other hand influence is likely to be greater still if all parties speak as one; for example the Joint Advisory Group for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (JAG) has considerable power because it represents surgeons, physicians,Please reply to: Mr Ross Carter, Lister Dept of Pancreaticobiliary Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow, G31 2ER Tel: 00 44 141 211 5129 Fax: 00 44 141 552 3229 e-mail: rcarter@clinmed.gla.ac.uk
  • 7. Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland Pancreatic Section of the BSG nurses, paediatricians and primary care. It is difficult for trusts and other institutions to be idiosyncratic when the full force of the profession says otherwise. Thus, division into smaller pressure groups risks diminishing the influence that we all as medical and surgical gastroenterologists may need for mutually relevant issues.In response to these thoughts I would like to suggest that there is merit in developing afederation of societies representing luminal gastroenterology, hepatology, upper and lowergastrointestinal surgery and nutrition. The federation would comprise the Presidents ofeach society who would meet regularly but infrequently (maybe six- monthly) to discussmutually important and strategic issues. The federation could then represent our views toPMETB, Royal Colleges, the pharmaceutical industry, the press and government. It wouldhave no role in the policies, focus, administration or finance of any of its component societies. Thechairman would rotate and the agenda would be generated by the councils of each society.May I have your response to these thoughts and if you and the Pancreatic Society believe thatthis is a concept worth pursuing I would be happy to discuss this further and would like toanticipate an initial meeting towards the end of this year.Best Wishes Kel PalmerPlease reply to: Mr Ross Carter, Lister Dept of Pancreaticobiliary Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow, G31 2ER Tel: 00 44 141 211 5129 Fax: 00 44 141 552 3229 e-mail: rcarter@clinmed.gla.ac.uk