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    9/03 9/03 Document Transcript

    • 9/03 RESIDENCY REVIEW COMMITTEE FOR PEDIATRICS 515 North State Street, Suite 2000, Chicago, Illinois 60610 PROGRAM INFORMATION FORM PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGYDATE OF APPLICATION:TITLE OF PROGRAM: Stanford University Program(Use first line of program listing on the ACGME Website for core Pediatrics program to which this program is attached.New Application: ( ) Accredited Program: ( X )Pediatric Gastroenterology Program Director Full Time: YES NONAME: John Alan Kerner, MD XTitle: Director of Nutrition; Professor of PediatricsAddress: Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 750 Welch Road., Suite 116 Palo Alto, CA 94304E-mail Address: jkerner@stanfordmed.org or john.kerner@stanford.eduTelephone: (650) 723-5070 Fax: (650) 498-5608The signatures of the director of the program and the chief of the department attest to the completeness and accuracy of the informationprovided on these forms.Signature - Pediatric Gastroenterology Program Director Signature - Chief of Pediatrics/Department ChairmanSPONSORING INSTITUTION: (Name the entity, i.e., the university, hospital, or foundation that has administrative responsibility for thisprogram.)Name of Sponsor: Stanford UniversityAddress: 300 Pasteur Dr., Stanford CA 94304Name of Designated Institutional Official (Typed): Martha MarshSignature:If this is not a medical school program, is there an affiliation with a medical school: YES NOIf yes, name the medical school and append a document that specifically describes the effects of these arrangements onthis program. Label this Appendix C.Name of Medical School:
    • 2PRIMARY HOSPITAL (Hospital 1)Name: Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at StanfordAddress: 725 Welch Road City/State/ZIP: Palo Alto/CA/94304Total number of months pediatric gastroenterology trainee is 1st year: 9-11 2nd year: 2-11 3rd year: 2-11assigned to this institution in each year of training:Chief/Chair, Department of Pediatrics: Harvey J. Cohen, MD PhDFor each participating institution provide letters of agreement specifying the administrative and organizationalrelationships which bear upon the educational program. Attach as Appendix C.OTHER PARTICIPATING INSTITUTION (Hospital 2)Name: Stanford University HospitalAddress: 300 Pasteur Drive City/State/ZIP: Stanford/CA/94305Total number of months pediatric gastroenterology trainee is 1st year 0-2 2nd year 0-2 3rd year 0-2assigned to this institution in each year of training:Distance between 2 and 1 in Miles: 0 In Minutes: 0Is this hospital used for: (check appropriate Required Elective Other?box) rotations? rotations? XChief/Chair, Department of Pediatrics: Harvey J. Cohen, MD PhDOTHER PARTICIPATING INSTITUTION (Hospital 3)Name:Address: City/State/ZIP:Total number of months pediatric gastroenterology trainee is 1st year 2nd year 3rd yearassigned to this institution in each year of training:Distance between 3 and 1 in Miles: In Minutes:Is this hospital used for: (check Required Elective Other?appropriate box) Rotations? rotations?Chief/Chair, Department of Pediatrics:
    • 3 DURATION OF TRAININGThe program requirements which were approved by the ACGME on February 16, 1993, contain the following paragraphregarding the duration of training:Two years of progressive educational experience is required, which includes the development of procedural skills,responsibility for patient care and participation in research. Any program that extends training beyond the minimumrequirements must present clear educational rationale consonant with the Program requirements and objectives forresidency training. The program director must obtain approval of the Residency Review Committee prior toimplementation and at each subsequent review of the program. Prior to entry in the program, each resident must benotified in writing of the required length of training.If you propose or offer a program of three years duration, please provide the educational rationale below. In doing so,make reference to both the Program requirements for Pediatric Gastroenterology and the Program Requirements forSubspecialties of Pediatric ProgramsOur program is of three years duration for the following reasons:1) Three years of full-time subspecialty residency training in pediatric Gastroenterology is required by the American Board ofPediatrics for those physicians entering training on or after January 1, 1990: a) Announcement of 1990 Pediatrics Gastroenterology Examination. b) Eligibility Criteria for Certification in Pediatrics Gastroenterology2) Because the majority of pediatric subspecialists practice in academic health centers, there is a need to provide greater emphasison research training as well as to strengthen the training in clinical care. To meet the goals stated above, our program is in agreementwith the American Academy of Pediatrics statement in their newsletter for Diplomates Volume 9 (1), July 1988 that three years arenecessary to provide the proper research foundation to succeed in academic pediatrics and to allow a greater clinical exposure as well. We begin the trainee’s research experience in the first year and continue that experience for the entire period of training in order toallow for the development of research skills and to bring a project to completion (thus, we are in compliance with “Requirements For AllAccredited Pediatric Subspecialties”).3) The ACGME program requirements for residency education in Pediatric Gastroenterology effective July 2002 requirethree years of progressive educational experience that includes the development of procedural skills, responsibility forpatient care, and participation in research. To meet these requirements, our program is three years in duration. We arecurrently accredited as a three year program and all fellows are provided this information in writing prior to entry in theprogram. SUBSPECIALTY RESIDENTSPrograms making initial application should provide ONLY THE INFORMATION marked by an asterisk (*) in the topsection of the of this page:*Number of positions offered: Year 1: 2 Year 2: 2 Year 3: 1Number of positions filled: Year 1: 2 Year 2: 2 Year 3: 1*Source of salary support for % from NIH: % from other non-federal % from hospital: 20%subspecialty residents: (Add programs: 60% (usually 40%)the salaries of all no current NIH funding 1) Pediatric Research Fundsubspecialty residents and (Packard Foundation) or 100% for year 1 for 4 of the 5indicate what percent of the 2) Transplant and Tissue Fellows (Dr. Lue’s fundingtotal is supplied by each of Engineering Center of Excellence comes from his endowed Fellowship and Endowment Fund. fellowship)the following services:) 3) Paul and Yuanabi Ramsey Endowed Fellowship – Full funding for 3 years for Dr. James Lue. % from other federal % from practice-generated % from other: 20% programs: None income: Endowed Fellowship*Does the program have a funded training grant? None *If YES (until 6/30/2003) NOyes, supply the following: *If yes, supply the following:*Grant: 2 T32 *Amount: $155,000/yr. *Project Director: John Kerner, M.D.HD07397-21 7/1/98 – 6/30/03NIH: NIDDK grant ended 6/30/2003
    • 4 CURRENT SUBSPECIALTY RESIDENTSProvide the following information regarding the current subspecialty residents in the program: Date began Name of ACGME- Name gastroenterolog accredited pediatric Date of Date of y program residency program completion Name of medical graduation completed school Lue, James 7/2006 Children’s Hospital 6/06 University of California 5/03 Los Angeles, CA @ San Francisco, CA Talisetti, Anita 7/2006 University of Illinois 6/05 M.S. Ramaiah 3/00 Chicago, IL Teaching Hospital Bangalor, India Wong, Allison 7/2005 University of California 6/05 Keck School of 5/1/02 Davis, CA Medicine University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA Mian, Sameera 7/2005 University of Nevada 6/05 St. George University 6/1/02 Reno, NV St. George’s, Grenada 7/2004 University of Illinois 6/04 University De Med Si 10/1/1998 Safta, Anca Chicago, IL Farm Carol Davila, Bucharest, Romania
    • 4a GRADUATES OF THE PROGRAM Total number of graduates of the program in the last five years: 7Provide the following information regarding the subspecialty residents who have completed the program in the last five years. Useadditional pages as necessary, numbered 4a, 4b, etc. Include name, present location, present position, type of practice, if sub-board certification in pediatric gastroenterology has been achieved. Date completed Sub-BoardGraduates of Last 5 Years gastroenterology Present Location Present Position Type of Practice Certification program Norberto Rodriguez, M.D. 6/30/2001 University of Texas, Assistant Professor Academic Peds G-I 2003 Southwestern Director of Pediatric GI Fellowship C. Allan Pratt, M.D. 6/30/2002 Anchorage, Alaska Gastroenterologist Private Practice Peds G-I 2005 Yinka Davies, M.D. 6/30/2003 Sutter Memorial Gastroenterologist Private Practice Board Eligible Medical Center Sacramento, CA Melissa Hurwitz, M.D. 6/30/04 Stanford University Clinical Assistant Academic Board Eligible Medical Center Professor 6/30/2005 Legacy Emanuel Gastroenterologist Staff Physician Peds G-I 2005 Matthew Riley, M.D. Children’s Hospital Portland, Oregon Jacqueline Fridge, M.B., 6/30/03 Oakland Children’s Gastroenterologist/ Staff Physician/ Peds G-I 2005 Ch.B., M.B.A. Hospital Adjunct Clinical Academic Oakland, CA/ Assistant Professor Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Phuong Christine Nguyen, 9/15/2006 California Pacific Gastroenterologist/Ad Staff Physician/ Board Eligible M.D. Medical Center junct Clinical Academic San Francisco, CA/ Instructor Stanford University Medical Center
    • 5 PROGRAM FACULTY Program Requirements for Subspecialties of Pediatrics, IV Program Requirements Pediatric Gastroenterology, VA. PROGRAM DIRECTOR Explain how the program director meets the Program requirements with regard to: a) Board and Sub-board certification; b) demonstrated competence as a teacher and researcher; and, c) Adequate administrative experience to direct the program.a) Board and Sub-board Certification:Dr. Kerner has been a faculty member in Pediatric Gastroenterology since 1979 at Stanford University School of Medicine. He was board certified in Pediatrics in 1979. He wasboard certified in Pediatric Gastroenterology in 1990. He was recertified in Pediatric Gastroenterology in 1998 and again in 2005.b) Demonstrated Competence as a Teacher and Researcher:Dr. Kerner has received three prestigious teaching awards: a) named by the Pediatric Housestaff as the Pediatric Faculty Member Who Contributed Most to Housestaff Teaching(6/81); b) Kaiser Award for Innovative and Outstanding Contributions to Medical Education at Stanford University Medical School (6/87); c) Joseph St. Geme Education Award fromthe Western Society of Pediatric Research (1/03). Dr, Kerner was a featured speaker at the National Medical Association Meetings (8/92) and at the American Academy ofPediatrics Annual Meeting (10/92) where he taught a G-I Review and Update Course. He also taught at the Northwestern American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition(ASPEN) (10/92) and at the Arizona Chapter of ASPEN the year prior. His C.V. highlights several recent lectures at major meetings. He is also the director of the highly successfulinterdisciplinary course, “Advances in Perinatal and Pediatric Nutrition,” currently in its 18th year. He has developed a core curriculum for pediatric house staff in PediatricGastroenterology and Nutrition. His C.V. demonstrates both significant collaborative and independent research endeavors and evidence of ongoing research funding. He has alsodeveloped teaching materials for pediatric housestaff. He is the principal investigator of an NIH grant, a Nutrition Academic Award, to develop a web-based nutrition curriculum forStanford Medical Students (~$800,000 for 2000-2006). He also has current internal funding for “Aluminum Toxicity in Patients Receiving TPN”.c) Administrative ExperienceDr. Kerner directed or co-directed the Pediatric G-I program from 1979 – 1994. Since 1995 he has served as the Associate Director of the Division. He served as the director of theCalifornia Children’s Service (CCS) Designated G-I Center from 1979 – 1994. He currently chairs two committees at the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford – 1) Nutritionand Total Parenteral Nutrition Committee; 2) Home Health Care Committee. He has continuously participated in Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement Monitoring of thePediatric Gastroenterology Division. He currently directs the division’s teaching of both pediatric residents and medical students. Further, he currently serves as Medical Director ofthe Home Pharmacy of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford (LPCH). He also serves as the physician Director of the Nutrition Support Team at LPCH. If not certified by the American Board of Pediatrics Sub-board of Pediatric Gastroenterology, provide evidence of equivalent qualifications. Use an additional page numbered as page 5a to include your answer. Do not exceed one page.
    • B. FACULTY List below the faculty members who are direct contributors to the program, including the program director. List the gastroenterologists first. Time on gastroenterology teaching service should include the total of time spent providing instruction, supervising inpatient and outpatient experiences and supervising consultation experiences. Also include and identify any research mentors who participate in training. Duplicate this page if necessary. Time on gastroenterology teaching Certification service Location: Name Primary specialty Hospital 1, 2, 3 Hrs. per week Wks. per year Pediatrics Recertification Specify other (yr.) (yr.) board & year Pediatric Peds GI 1995 Dorsey Bass 50 - 60 48 1 1987 Gastroenterology recert. 2001 William Berquist Pediatric 50 - 60 48 1 1980 Peds GI 1990, Gastroenterology recert. 1998, 2005 Pediatric Peds GI 1990 Ken Cox 50 - 60 48 1 1977 Gastroenterology recert 1998, 2005 Pediatric Ricardo Castillo 50 - 60 48 1 1981 Peds GI 1995 Gastroenterology Pediatric Manuel Garcia 50 - 60 48 1 1995 Peds GI 2001 Gastroenterology Pediatric Melissa Hurwitz 50 - 60 48 1 2000 Gastroenterology Pediatric Peds GI 1990, John Kerner 50 - 60 48 1 1979 Gastroenterology recert. 1998, 2005 Pediatric Peds GI 1997 Eric Sibley 50 - 60 48 1 1994 2000 Gastroenterology recert 2005 American Board of Carlos Esquivel Liver Transplantation 50 - 60 48 1,2 ------ Surgery 1985 Internal Medicine Emmet Keefe Adult 2 ------ 1972 Gastroenterology Gastro-enterology 1975For each of those listed above, provide details of the individuals role in the pediatric gastroenterology training program. If not certified in pediatric gastroenterology, provide evidenceof equivalent qualifications. Specify the type of contact with the subspecialty residents, e.g., lectures, group discussions, ward rounds, laboratory supervision, patient care activities,consultations. Indicate clearly how the reported time is distributed. Include research mentors. Use additional pages as needed, numbered as 5b, 5c, etc.C. CURRICULUM VITAE 1. Attach as Appendix A the program directors full curriculum vitae and complete bibliography of articles in peer-reviewed journals. 2. For faculty members listed on the chart above, other than the program director, attach curriculum vitae using the CV format contained on the page identified as Appendix B at the end of this form and follow its instructions.Contributing Faculty MembersJohn A. Kerner, Jr., M.D. is the director of the Fellowship Training Program. Currently, Dr. Kerner is the G-I inpatient attending for 15 weeks/year as well
    • as an Attending in the Tuesday afternoon and the Thursday all-day Pediatric G-I clinic all year. He also covers the Wednesday Acute (Urgent) Clinic for13 weeks/year. In those roles, Dr. Kerner supervises the G-I resident(s) and pediatric house officers with patient care responsibilities and directlysupervises the G-I resident(s) for any G-I procedures. In addition, Dr. Kerner coordinates the lecture series for the G-I/Nutrition component of the NoonLecture Series for housestaff, students, and G-I residents. He leads group discussions and conducts rounds during his time on clinical service andparticipates in the G-I/Nutrition teaching for the pediatric residents’ “Morning Report” all year long. He has served as a mentor for G-I residents involvedin clinical research. He has consistently had private funding for clinical research (see his C.V.). His research interest is in the area of neonatal andchildhood nutrition and nutrition support. He has had recent grant funding from Genentech to evaluate the effect of alteplase on the clearance ofoccluded central venous catheters. He has a NIH Nutrition Academic Award (2000-2006) to develop a web-based nutrition curriculum for Stanfordmedical students. He has internal funding by LPCH to study “Potential for Aluminum Toxicity in Pediatric Patients on TPN”. He gives regular lectures tothe G-I residents and pediatric house staff on total parenteral nutrition and nutrition support issues.Ricardo O. Castillo, M.D. joined the division in 1985 as the Co-Director of Pediatric Gastroenterology and served in that capacity through 1994. he is theMedical Director of the Pediatric Small Bowel Transplant Program and Director of the Program in Intestinal Rehabilitation. He is an attending in theMonday afternoon G-I clinic all year. While serving as the inpatient attending, his clinical and teaching responsibilities are identical to Dr. Kerner’s. Heserves as Inpatient Attending on the Gastroenterology Service for 2 weeks per year and as the Liver Transplant Service Attending 15 weeks per year.He also participates in the Noon Lecture Series and Morning Report. He has served as a mentor for G-I residents pursuing basic science projects andhas an active laboratory. He has had R01 NIH Grant support in the past. His current research focus is on aspects of small bowel transplantation. Dr.Castillo is board certified in Pediatrics and in Pediatric G-I.Dorsey M. Bass, M.D. joined the division in 1990 after completing a post-doctorate research fellowship with Dr. Harry Greenberg at Stanford. He iscurrently the G-I inpatient attending for 15 weeks/year , Liver Transplant Service* attending for 5 weeks/year, as well as attending for Tuesday afternoon,Friday morning, and Friday afternoon G-I clinic all year. As the inpatient attending, his clinical and teaching responsibilities are identical to Dr. Kerner’s.He also participates in the Noon Lecture Series and Morning Report. Dr. Bass is in the process of developing an Inflammatory Bowel Center at ourhospital. He is a potential basic science mentor for G-I residents. His research interest is in the area of viral gastroenteritis. Dr. Bass is board certifiedin Pediatrics and in Pediatric G-I. He gives lectures to medical students (in Medical Microbiology) and our G-I residents on various aspects ofgastrointestinal infections.Manuel Garcia, M.D. joined the division in 1991. Currently, he is the G-I inpatient attending for 4 weeks/year. He also attends the all day Monday G-Iclinic all year. While he serves as the G-I inpatient attending, his clinical and teaching responsibilities are identical to Dr. Kerner’s. He also participatesin the Noon Lecture Series and Morning Report. He spends 75% of his time at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (SCVMC) providing pediatric G-Iservices there. SCVMC is a affiliated hospital of Stanford University Medical Center. Dr. Garcia is board certified in Pediatrics and in Pediatric G-I.Eric Sibley, M.D., Ph.D. joined the GI division, after completion of his fellowship at Stanford, in 1996 and is associate director (research) of theFellowship Training Program. He is the GI inpatient attending for 4 weeks per year and attends in the Friday afternoon G-I clinic all year. While servingas inpatient attending, his clinical and teaching responsibilities are identical to Dr. Kerner’s. He also participates in the Noon Lecture Series and MorningReport. He is a potential basic science mentor for pediatric G-I residents. He has had steady research funding and recently was awarded a prestigiousNIH grant, “Spatiotemporal Regulation of Intestinal Gene Expression” for 2003 though 2008. Dr. Sibley is board certified in Pediatrics and in PediatricG-I. He has recently been promoted to Associate Professor with tenure (a major distinction at Stanford). Dr. Sibley regularly lectures to Stanfordmedical students and our G-I residents on G-I physiology and pathology as well as on G-I tract development.William Berquist, M.D. joined the G-I division in 1995. He currently covers the G-I inpatient services for 8 weeks/year; he covers the Liver transplantservice for an additional 12 weeks. While he is inpatient attending, his clinical and teaching responsibilities are identical to Dr. Kerner’s. Like the rest ofthe G-I faculty, he also participates in the Noon Lecture Series and Morning Report. He attends the Monday afternoon and Thursday clinics all year. Heis the Medical Director of the Ambulatory Procedure Unit where virtually all G-I procedures take place; he is also the Medical Director of Pediatric LiverTransplant. He is the principle teacher of motility disorders for the G-I residents. He gives regular lectures on motility and other procedure related topicsfor the G-I residents. He has significant NIH grant support to perform studies in Pediatric Liver Transplantation. Dr. Berquist is a potential clinicalresearch mentor for G-I residents. Additionally, he runs a support group for children with inflammatory bowel disease (and their parents) which takesplace one evening per month. The G-I resident has the opportunity to observe and participate in the support group. Dr. Berquist is board certified inPediatrics and in Pediatric G-I.Kenneth Cox, M.D. joined the G-I division as Division Chief in 1995. He serves as inpatient Liver Transplant service attending for 9 weeks/year and G-I
    • service attending for 3 weeks/year.. He also attends in the Monday G-I clinic all year. While serving as inpatient attending, his clinical and teachingactivities are similar to Dr. Kerner’s. He participates in the Noon Lecture Series and Morning Report. He runs the weekly G-I division conference (8 –9am) each Monday where the following are reviewed: 1) weekend phone calls; 2) current status of all G-I and Liver Inpatients as well as all active G-I/liver consults; 3) Pediatric surgical issues; 4) Quality Assurance (QA) Issues; 5) Review of the upcoming week’s admissions, clinics and procedures. Dr. Cox has had research funding in the area of family centered care and has received recent support to evaluate the role of microflora in healthychildren and patients with sclerosing cholangitis and biliary atresia. He is a potential clinical research mentor for G-I residents.He is board certified inPediatrics and in Pediatric G-I. Dr. Cox regularly lectures to the G-I residents in the area of hepatology and liver transplant.Melissa Hurwitz, M.D. joined the faculty in July 2004 as Clinical Assistant Professor in the Clinician-Educator line. She serves as an Attending in G-I Clinic onMondays all day and Tuesday afternoon all year. She serves as inpatient Liver Transplant attending for 16 weeks/year. She is board certified in Pediatrics and willbe taking the Pediatric G-I Boards in 2007. She also serves as attending in Liver Transplant Clinic and the Intestinal Transplant Clinic. Additionally, she runs a G-Iclinic at SCVMC on Wednesdays all year when she is not inpatient liver transplant attending. She is involved in actively teaching the G-I residents, including Fridaynoon lectures (most recently on Autoimmune Hepatitis).Drs. Berquist, Castillo, Cox, and Hurwitz regularly rotate through both the Liver Transplant Clinic and Small Bowel Transplant Clinic and are directly involved inteaching our G-I residents in these clinics.Carlos Esquivel, M.D. is the Director of Adult and Pediatric Liver and Small Bowel Transplant Programs. He covers the surgical component of theTransplant program approximately 16 weeks per year. When on service, he rounds at least daily with the transplant surgery team and the pediatrichepatologist on service (the G-I resident also attends these rounds when covering the Liver Transplant service). He runs the monthly Morbidity andMortality Conference for the Division of Transplantation. He is actively involved in bench research, and has had extensive research funding. He is apotential mentor for G-I residents.Emmet Keefe, M.D. is the Medical Director, Adult Liver Transplant Program, former Adult G-I fellowship director, and former president of the AmericanGastroenterologic Association (AGA). Dr. Keefe has a number of currently funded research studies primarily in the area of the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Heis a potential clinical research mentor for the G-I resident.* The “Liver Transplant Service” now includes the Small Bowel Transplant Service as well.Inpatient Ward Rounds:As seen above, our service is split into two services – Gastroenterology (including consults) and Transplant (including Liver and Small Bowel Transplants). One G-I resident isalways assigned to each service. The G-I resident always has a faculty attending on each service. Our faculty vary in their inpatient responsibilities (described above). During wardrounds, each faculty member spends anywhere from 2-4 hours reviewing patients, examining patients and going over plans with the subspecialty residents and the house staff.Outpatient Care:Faculty work closely with and directly supervise the subspecialty residents in the outpatient setting (clinics). The subspecialty resident takes a history and physical, examines thepatient then presents the case to the faculty member. The faculty member reviews the consultations and the established follow-up visit with the subspecialty resident. The facultymember meets with the patient and family in conjunction with the subspecialty resident and they devise a treatment plan. Every patient seen on an outpatient basis in our clinics oracute care area are reviewed personally by the faculty member. Long-term parenteral and enteral nutrition support patients are currently being seen in the regular gastroenterologyclinics. Plans are underway to localize complex home TPN patients into a separate regular clinic day (or days).Research:Dr. Sibley has the role of overseeing, in general, the mentoring process of our subspecialty residents and makes certain that they are progressing along in doing their researchactivities. Dr. Sibley recommends appropriate mentors either inside our division or mentors who are a part of the long-time NIH-supported Digestive Disease Center or those whohave significant other G-I related research support.
    • The research mentors meet with the residents at first to help develop the research project. Once the project has been researched and the plan for it developed, it is presented infront of the entire faculty and subspecialty residents for their critique. After the projects are submitted and approved by the institutional research board, they are representedperiodically (at least every three months) to the faculty and subspecialty residents as progress reports.When the data are ready for presentation, it is brought before the entire division for their evaluation and criticism. This process is repeated until the manuscript developed from theresearch is submitted for publication. This entire process may involve multiple presentations before our faculty and other research fellows.
    • PROGRAM FACULTY (Continued) 6D. PROGRAM STAFF: RELATED SPECIALISTS (working with pediatric gastroenterology) at participating hospitals: Complete the following chart using the name of the primary staff member involved. It is understood that certification is not available in all of the disciplines listed below. Faculty hours reported should be only for hours CONTRIBUTED TO THIS PROGRAM. Use 40 hours per week as the full time equivalent. Numbers of additional faculty in each field should be entered in the last column. (If adult specialists cover pediatric subspecialties, enclose name or number in parentheses.) Sub-certification/ Faculty participation Discipline Name Recertification in training program Hospital 1, 2 or 3 No. of other faculty Year of Hours Weeks Name of certification/ per per Sub-board recertification week year Neo- Neonatology David Stevenson, M.D. natology 1979/2004 2 48 1 15 Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Michael Link, M.D. Heme/Onc 1980 2 48 1 8 Pediatric Allergy/Immunology Richard Moss, M.D. All/Imm 1981 1 48 1 2 Genetics Eugene Hoyme, M.D. Med Gen 1984 1 48 1 4 Pediatric Infectious Diseases Ann Arvin, M.D. 2 48 1 8 American Pediatric Surgery Craig Albanese, M.D. Board of 1992 5 48 1 5 Surgery American Pediatric Anesthesiology Anita Honkanen, M.D. Board of 1996 5 48 1 13 Anesthe- siology Anatomic Pediatric Pathology Richard Sibley, M.D. Pathology 1975 5 48 2 0 Pediatric Radiology Richard Barth, M.D. Ped Rad 1995 5 48 1 6 Child & Child Psychiatry and/or Psychology Richard Shaw, M.D. Adoles 1993/indef. 5 48 1 5 Psych Pediatric Nutrition John Kerner, M.D. G-I & 1990/2005 10 48 1 1 Nutrition American Other: (specify) Carlos Esquivel, M.D. Board of 1985/1995 10 48 1,2 3 Transplantation Surgery Surgery Pediatric Lorry Frankel, M.D. Critical 1990/2005 5 48 1 7 Pediatric Critical Care Care Medicine
    • If any of the above are not housed predominantly in the primary hospital, provide specific details of their availability to the program. Include on a page numbered 6a.All of these individuals are available to the Pediatric Gastroenterology training program on a daily basis, 40 hours per week. The training program has a formal arrangementwith Pediatric Surgery (monthly conference), Transplant Surgery (twice weekly Liver Transplant Clinic; weekly Small Bowel Transplant Clinic; daily rounds), PediatricPathology (weekly Liver Transplant conference; monthly G-I conference), and Pediatric Radiology (monthly conference). The other specialists’ contributions are madethrough consultation, teaching on the wards, and Pediatric clinical and research conferences.D. PROGRAM STAFF: OTHER ANCILLARY STAFF List only the numbers of those who work in the pediatric gastroenterology training program: Hospital 1 Hospital 2 Hospital 3 Nurse specialists and/or physician extenders in gastroenterology 10.4 Pediatric social workers 2 Pediatric nutritionists 7 Other (specify): Child Psychologist 1 Oromotor Therapist 1 Nursing Assistant 1 Developmental Specialist 1Describe the involvement of the staff in each of these categories in the pediatric gastroenterology program:1. Nurse Specialists/Physician Extenders (Pediatric Nurse Practitioners):Three nurse practitioners work full-time for pediatric gastroenterology – Kathy Cox, P.N.P., Pat Frost, P.N.P. and Kaylie Nguyen, P.N.P. They enable the G-I service to seeadditional patients both in the G-I clinics at LPCH and at various outreach clinics including: Eureka, Ukiah, Stockton, Monterey, and Santa Cruz. They see patients, bothnew and return, and present them to G-I Attendings to come up with plans for diagnosis and management. They then become the front-line person handling all follow-upissues for their own patients.Three nurses are serving as Pediatric Liver and Small Bowel Transplant coordinators – Carmela Alviar, R.N., Deb Stricharz, R.N. and Marcia Kreisl, R.N. They are bothinvolved in seeing all liver and small bowel transplant outpatients at LPCH and at various outreach clinics in Oakland, Fresno, Sacramento, Portland, OR, as well asTacoma, WA, Honolulu, Hawaii, Albuquerque, NM, and Anchorage, AK. They coordinate all clinical care for these patients. They are also involved in evaluating patients forpossible transplantation, both in the inpatient and outpatient areas. They teach the families prior to transplantation what to expect after transplantation and help coordinatecare both in and out of the hospital. The G-I resident learns what their roles are and interact with them as part of the transplantation team. Two nurse practitioners, JenniferNielson, R.N., P.N.P., manage a subset of inpatient transplant patients—usually re-admitted transplant patients and patients being evaluated for transplantation. They takecall on weekends, rounding in-house each day and then taking phone calls from home. They take pressure and responsibility off of busy pediatric residents and G-Iresidents. Sarah Iverson, M.S., PA-C handles all “fresh” transplant patients (i.e., transplant patients immediately post-op). She acts as their primary caregiver Mondaythrough Friday and every third weekend (alternating with 2 “adult” physician assistants). The G-I resident, while on the transplant rotation, rounds with Sarah and is taughtimmediate post-op transplantation care from her and the transplant surgeons.
    • 7a1.4 FTE of nursing is devoted full-time to the Pediatric G-I service. Denise Lehman, R.N. directly performs all breath hydrogen tests and coordinates any outpatient or dayhospital activities – D-xylose testing, Golytely therapy for constipation, Alteplase treatment of central line occlusion and mechanical complications with gastrostomy tubes.Denise is responsible for coordinating all tests (x-rays, nuclear medicine, CT, G-I procedures, stool collections, etc.) scheduled in G-I clinic and is primarily responsible forfollowing up on all lab work drawn in G-I clinic. She works on authorizations required by insurance companies for future outpatient procedures and inpatient admissions. Sheserves as the “first-line” for all phone calls from patients or parents of G-I patients. She does all of the extensive paperwork required for all patients covered by CaliforniaChildren’s Services (C.C.S.) as we are a designated C.C.S. Center for Pediatric G-I/Nutrition. Many of these patients need extensive supplies for home enteral orparenteral nutrition. Denise runs a support group for children with inflammatory bowel disease and their parents. The group is co-run by Dr. William Berquist and meets at7pm once per month.2. Pediatric Social Workers:Two social workers are devoted to the Pediatric G-I service – Chris Dong, M.S.W. and Robin Newman, M.S.W. Chris is the one dedicated social worker for pediatric liverand small bowel transplant patients. Robin is dedicated to G-I patients. They both are available by pager to see patients in all our LPCH clinics. Both are available toprovide inpatient consultation for pediatric G-I patients. When they are not available (nights, weekends, vacation, illness), the hospital provides social service coverage 24hours a day, 7 days per week. Both Chris and Robin have played active roles in care conferences for complex G-I and liver patients in both the outpatient and inpatientareas. Their mental health worker expertise is highly valued by the entire G-I service. These two positions are funded by LPCH.Our two social workers help the patients and their families and teach the G-I residents about the social, physical, and psychological needs of the patients and their families.They work with the families to teach them how to deal with the stresses created by their child’s illness show the subspecialty residents how social workers extend the carephysicians provide. Subspecialty residents learn how to utilize the social worker to improve the quality of patient care both in the hospital and at home.3. Pediatric Nutritionists:The nutritionists teach the G-I residents techniques of nutritional assessment and the use of different types of specialized feedings. They teach techniques for enteral andparenteral nutrition and how to establish patients on both TPN and enteral feedings in the hospital and at home. They explain to the subspecialty residents transitionaltechniques to convert from TPN to tube feedings. Complications for both routes of feeding are reviewed. Nancy Baugh, R.D, is the primary nutritionist providing routine consultation to the LPCH G-I Clinics. She brings more than 20 years of nutrition support team experienceto her consults. Tanya Wapensky, R.D., is the lead nutritionist for our inpatient transplant patients. She covers the ICU, and 2 general wards (3E, 3W). Grace Shih, R.D., is the lead nutritionist for G-I inpatients. She covers 2 general wards (3S, 3N).Other key nutritionists with whom the G-I resident interacts are: Julie Matel, R.D., is the lead nutritionist for inpatient and all outpatient clinics for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Lisa Schultz, R.D., is the lead nutritionist for the use of the ketogenic diet, for all cardiac patients (CVICU, cardiology patients on 3W and in the IICU). She also coversour intermediate care nursery (IICN). Olivia Mayer, R.D., is the lead nutritionist for the NICU. Monica Holt, R.D. is the lead nutritionist for diabetes (inpatient and outpatient), inpatient metabolic patients, renal and infant development clinic, and high risk obstetricalinpatients.In 1994, LPCH established a formal Nutrition Support Team. All LPCH inpatients requiring parenteral nutrition are seen on initiation of parenteral nutrition and followed atleast weekly. The team includes all of the above named nutritionists. The medical director of the team is Dr. John Kerner. The team’s other two key members are RobertPoole, Pharm.D., Director of Pharmacy at LPCH and Colleen Nespor, R.N., a nutrition support nurse. The team is nationally recognized for its excellence and isresponsible for numerous publications including the first published “Clinical Pathway for Pediatric Parenteral Nutrition” published in Nutrition in Clinical Practice in 1997. Theteam makes formal rounds once per week on all new parenteral nutrition patients and any ongoing patients where there are questions or concerns. The Pediatric G-Isubspecialty resident attends these rounds while on the “Nutrition” rotation and other times when able.
    • All these nutritionists are funded by LPCH.4. Child Psychologist:Michelle Brown, Ph.D. is available to all the G-I clinics and the inpatient service for G-I consultations. She is a key member of the Child Psychiatry liaison service. Shouldthe patient require intensive psychiatry support, the child is admitted to the “Comprehensive Care” Unit at LPCH South (El Camino Hospital in Mountain View, CA) whereLPCH has a special unit. That hospital is approximately 20 minutes away from LPCH.5. Oromotor Therapist:Marianna Thorn, O.T. provides consultation both for the G-I clinics and inpatient units. She has been very active in working with our physicians, nurses, and nutritionists inpreparing appropriate, detailed care plans for complex patients with feeding disorders.6. Nursing Assistant:One nursing assistant is assigned to us for the entire time of the eight half-days of clinic; he/she “checks in” patients, obtaining heights, weights, and head circumference(plotting them out on appropriate graphs), and vital signs where appropriate. She also assists in obtaining and sending off appropriate stool, urine, and blood studies.7. Developmental Specialist:Karen Wayman, M.A. is the division’s developmental specialist. She sees patients both in the outpatient clinic and the inpatient units. She is heavily involved in researchstudies assessing neurodevelopmental outcome, particularly of liver transplant patients. She has an endowed position funded by the Lucile Packard Foundation.
    • 8 FACILITIES AND SERVICES Program Requirements Pediatric Gastroenterology, IVIndicate the availability of the following: Hospital 1 Hospital 2 Hospital 3 Facility/Service Yes No Yes No Yes No Space in an ambulatory setting for optimal evaluation and X care of patients An inpatient area with pediatric and related services (including surgery and psychiatry) staffed by pediatric residents and X faculty Support services including radiology laboratory, nuclear X X medicine and pathology X Pediatric intensive care unit Number of beds in PICU 24 ** Neonatal intensive care unit X Number of beds in NICU 40* Access to gastrointestinal function laboratory capable of measuring intestinal absorptive function, esophageal X physiology and pancreatic function and nutritional parameters in pediatrics patients Flexible endoscopy facilities X XProvide an explanation if NO is indicated for any of the above facilities and/or services across all hospitals:*There are also 29 additional beds for the Intermediate Intensive Care Nursery.**There are also 10 additional beds in the Intermediate ICU.+The Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford (LPCH), is a separately licensed entity but physically is attached to Stanford University Hospital. It is a regional andtertiary care facility providing all pediatric medical and surgical services associated with Stanford University Medical Center (which encompasses LPCH – Hospital 1 andStanford University Hospital – Hospital 2).** LPCH utilizes some of Stanford University Hospital’s facilities including Nuclear Medicine, Fluoroscopy rooms for ERCP’s and balloon dilatations, CT and MRI scanning,the Operating Rooms and Surgical Pathology.
    • 9 PATIENT DATAProvide the following information for the most recent 12-month period. Inclusive dates: FROM (mm/dd/yy): 09/01/04 TO (mm/dd/yy): 08/31/05 INPATIENT 1. Total number of admissions for whom the pediatric gastroenterology service assumed 562 major clinical responsibility: a. Average daily census of patients on the pediatric gastroenterology service 11.2 If ADC is less than six, please explain how residents have an adequate exposure to inpatients on a page numbered 8a. b. Number of new patients admitted each year (“new” refers to those who are 197 being seen by the gastroenterologists for the first time): c. Average length of stay of patients on the pediatric gastroenterology service: 10.3 days 2. Number of consultations by pediatric gastroenterologists on other inpatients: 309 a. Are consultations provided to the NICU? YES X NO If yes, how many? 51 b. Are consultations provided to the PICU? YES X NO If yes, how many? 24
    • AMBULATORY PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY EXPERIENCE FOR ALL YEARS OF TRAINING Duration of Number of Number of Number of Average Average Faculty Name of Experience Experience Sessions Per New Patients Return Number Number Supervision Hospital/Other Setting Identifier (in wks/yr) Week Per Per Patients Per Other Trainees Teaching Resident Resident resident Per Session Attendings Per Session Per Session Per SessionG-I Clinic at LPCH (Monday all day; Tuesday P.M.; Thursday all Yday; Friday all day) 48-52 1-4 0-2 3-6 0-3 2-4G-I “Urgent” Clinic at LPCH (Wednesday P.M.) 48-52 2x/month * 4 0 0-1 1 YLiverTransplant Clinic at LPCH (Monday and Thursday P.M.) 48-52 0- 2 0-1 ** 3-4 0-2 2 YSmall Bowel Transplant Clinic (Wednesday P.M.) 48-52 0-1 0-1 1 YOptional Outreach Clinic – Chico (Wednesday/Thursday) 12 4-5 5-6 1 YOptional Outreach Clinic – Santa Clara Valley Medical Center Y(Wednesday P.M., Thursday A.M., Friday A.M.) 48-52 2 2-3 1Optional Outreach Clinic – Santa Cruz (All day) 12 1 5-7 1 YOptional Outreach Clinic – Monterey (1/2 day) 12 1 3-4 1 YOptional Outreach Clinic – Eureka (All day) 4 4-5 5-6 1 YOptional Outreach Clinic – Liver Transplant – Oakland (1/2 day), YFresno (1/2 day) 3-5 * Primarily for Y N 1st yr G-I Residents1. If the experience is in a private office, provide full details, including name and credentials of supervisor, numbers and types of patients, degree of resident responsibility for their care, frequency of attendance at office, how director monitors the experience and resident performance. Include as pages 10a, 10b, etc.2. Explain how the residents have the opportunity to provide outpatient care for patients whom they treated on the inpatient service. See page 17, #3. Outpatient Experiences; sections b. and d. ** G-I residents are assigned to “New Evaluation” Liver Transplant patients whenever possible. The G-I residents are expected to attend at least one G-I outreach clinic and one liver transplant outreach clinic to appreciate the role of our faculty and the role of our G-I colleagues at liver transplant outreach clinics.
    • 11 12-MONTH SUMMARY: OUTPATIENT CLINICS/INPATIENT SERVICESDuring the same 12-month period as used on page 9, how many pediatric patients with the following gastroenterology problemswere: a) seen in the ambulatory settings; b) were admitted to and/or consulted on by the pediatric gastroenterologists at theprimary hospital? PROGRAMS MAKING NEW APPLICATION SHOULD COMPLETE ONLY THE COLUMNS MARKED BY ANASTERISK ( * ). Inclusive Dates: FROM (mm/dd/yy): 09/01/2004 TO (mm/dd/yy): 08/31/2005 Gastroenterology Outpatients Inpatients problems Number of Number seen by Inpatient service Consultations patients* subspecialty residents No. on No. seen by No. of No. seen by gastro subspecialty consults* subspecialty service* residents residents 1. Growth failure and malnutrition 3392 69 74 74 42 42 2. Malabsorption (celiac disease, cystic 1322 24 67 67 10 10 fibrosis, pancreatic insufficiency, etc.) 3. Gastrointestinal allergy 27 15 2 2 1 1 4. Peptic ulcer disease 3 0 0 0 0 0 5. Jaundice 89 22 16 16 13 13 6. Liver failure (including evaluation and 560 23 126 126 20 20 follow-up care of patient requiring liver transplantation) 7. Digestive tract anomalies 469 19 35 35 41 41 8. Chronic inflammatory bowel disease 134 44 6 6 1 1 9. Functional bowel disorders 91 3 15 15 4 4 10. Gastrointestinal problems in the 0 0 2 2 3 3 immune-compromised host 11. Vomiting (including 2056 77 47 47 64 64 gastroesophageal reflux) 12. Acute and chronic abdominal pain 783 41 30 30 20 20 13. Acute and chronic diarrhea 340 16 8 8 13 13 14. Constipation (including 1896 49 7 7 8 8 Hirshsprung disease) 15. Gastrointestinal bleeding 199 25 30 30 27 27 16. Gastrointestinal infections 300 5 52 52 5 5 17. Motility disorders 484 1 2 2 2 2 18. Infectious and metabolic liver diseases 474 28 28 28 29 29 19. Pancreatitis 63 1 15 15 3 3 12A
    • LIST OF DIAGNOSESList 150 CONSECUTIVE admissions and/or consultations from the general pediatric service to the gastroenterology serviceduring the same 12-month period as used on the previous pages. Use additional pages as necessary. Submit a separate list foreach hospital that provides required rotations. Number all additional pages in sequence as 12a, 12b, etc. Hospital: Inclusive dates during which these FROM (mm/dd/yy): TO (mm/dd/yy): admissions/consultations occurred: 12/01/2005 04/10/2006 PATIENT ID NUMBER OF DAYS IN HOSPITAL GASTROENTEROLOGIC DIAGNOSIS NUMBER AGE 1869484-4 6M 9 FEEDING INTOLERANCE 6203940-9 16Y 4 S/P SB TRANSPLANT; FEVER/SEPSIS 6087522-6 14Y 7 ABDOMINAL PAIN; UPJ OBSTRUCTION 6184478-3 5Y 6 RETROPERITONEAL MASS; ALAGILLE SYNDROME 4003465-4 11M 7 METABOLIC LIVER DISEASE 4005179-9 1M 10 ABDOMINAL DISTENSION/ANAL STENOSIS 4005176-5 1M 10 ABDOMINAL DISTENSION/ANAL STENOSIS 4004589-0 9M 29 GROWTH FAILURE/MALNUTRITION/GT EVAL 1764310-7 4Y 4 CHRONIC ABDOMINAL PAIN 6010196-1 14Y 4 ABDOMINAL PAIN 6264408-3 2Y 17 INTESTINAL PSEUDOOBSTRUCTION; FEVER/SEPSIS 1798508-6 15M 77 ADENOVIRUS ENTERITIS; WISKOTT ALDRICH 4001138-9 10Y 115 RECURRENT EMESIS; ALL 4002678-3 3M 10 BAFK; ASCITES 4003312-8 7M 8 BAFK; GROWTH FAILURE 6257192-2 5Y GI BLEEDING 6201521-9 5Y 1 GI POLYPS; S/P POLYPECTOMY 1893316-8 8M 108 SHORT BOWEL SYNDROME; ESLD; GI BLEED 1900714-5 7Y 55 S/P LIVER TRANSPLANT; FEVER/NEUT; LYMPHOMA 6289167-6 2Y 6 S/P LIVER TRANSPLANT; FEVER; GI BLEED 1800969-6 3Y METABOLIC DS; TRANSAMINITIS 4005697-0 2M 8 MALROTATION S/P LADDS; CHYLOUS ASCITES 4000614-0 2M VOMITING/GER 12B
    • PATIENT ID NUMBER OF DAYS IN HOSPITAL GASTROENTEROLOGIC DIAGNOSISNUMBER AGE1873614-0 15M MALROTATION S/P LADDS; VOMITING4000677-7 2M HEMANGIOENDOTHELIOMA; GROWTH FAILURE6096089-5 9Y 10 GI BLEEDING1875917-5 9M 9 HEMANGIOENDOTHELIOMA; GROWTH FAILURE6194535-8 7Y 1 S/P LIVER BIOPSY; TRANSAMINITIS1874868-1 6Y 8 PANCREAS DIVISUM6092451-1 9Y CF; GROWTH FAILURE4001292-4 2M CONGENITAL HT.DS; GROWTH FAILURE6098299-8 10Y 7 IMMUNODEFICIENCY; TRANSAMINITIS6198082-7 10Y JRA; DERMATOMYOSITIS; PANCREATITIS4006214-3 1Y 6 CAUSTIC INGESTION6054317-0 12Y GERD6102727-2 12Y 5 GI BLEEDING6258209-3 17Y 1 METABOLIC LIVER DS; S/P LIVER BIOPSY1878635-0 6M 4 DOWN SYNDROME; GROWTH FAILURE4003533-9 7M 4 LIVER FAILURE; TRANSPLANT EVALUATION6090287-1 13Y 4 CROHN’S DISEASE4004967-8 5Y 3 GI BLEEDING; TRANSPLANT (LIVER) EVAL1899849-2 3M GERD; EX 27 WEEK PREMIE6243602-7 3Y 8 S/P LIVER TRANSPLANT; SEVERE CONSTIPATION4006814-0 2M ARTHROGRYPOSIS; TRANSAMINITIS4005420-7 1M S/P NEC; FEEDING INTERLOANCE1802664-1 1Y 4 GI DYSMOTILITY4006865-2 8M 22 LIVER FAILURE1848781-9 5Y GI DYSMOTILITY6264408-3 2Y 9 INTERTINAL PSEUDOOBSTRUCTION; FEVER/SEPSIS1772429-5 2Y 4 GI BLEEDING; S/P LIVER TRANSPLANT1878438-9 12Y CONSTIPATION6271311-0 2Y GI BLEEDING; ALL 12C
    • PATIENT ID NUMBER OF DAYS IN HOSPITAL GASTROENTEROLOGIC DIAGNOSISNUMBER AGE6247121-4 5Y S/P LIVER TRANSPLANT; HCC1926186-6 17Y 1 GASTRIC FOREIGN BODY4003465-4 10M 7 METABOLIC LIVER DISEASE6212885-5 5Y 2 S/P LIVER TRANSPLANT; GI BLEEDING4007172-2 1Y GI BLEEDING6064629-6 18Y GERD/VOMITING; UPPER GI BLEED4001292-4 2M CONGENITAL HT.DS; GROWTH FAILURE6098299-8 10Y 7 IMMUNODEFICIENCY; TRANSAMINITIS6198082-7 10Y JRA; DERMATOMYOSITIS; PANCREATITIS4006214-3 1Y 6 CAUSTIC INGESTION6054317-0 12Y GERD6102727-2 12Y 5 GI BLEEDING6258209-3 17Y 1 METABOLIC LIVER DS; S/P LIVER BIOPSY1878635-0 6M 4 DOWN SYNDROME; GROWTH FAILURE4003533-9 7M 4 LIVER FAILURE; TRANSPLANT EVALUATION6090287-1 13Y 4 CROHN’S DISEASE4004967-8 5Y 3 GI BLEEDING; TRANSPLANT (LIVER) EVAL1899849-2 3M GERD; EX 27 WEEK PREMIE6243602-7 3Y 8 S/P LIVER TRANSPLANT; SEVERE CONSTIPATION4006814-0 2M ARTHROGRYPOSIS; TRANSAMINITIS4005420-7 1M S/P NEC; FEEDING INTERLOANCE1802664-1 1Y 4 GI DYSMOTILITY4006865-2 8M 22 LIVER FAILURE1848781-9 5Y GI DYSMOTILITY6264408-3 2Y 9 INTERTINAL PSEUDOOBSTRUCTION; FEVER/SEPSIS1772429-5 2Y 4 GI BLEEDING; S/P LIVER TRANSPLANT1878438-9 12Y CONSTIPATION6271311-0 2Y GI BLEEDING; ALL
    • 12D PATIENT ID NUMBER OF DAYS IN HOSPITAL GASTROENTEROLOGIC DIAGNOSISNUMBER AGE6247121-4 5Y S/P LIVER TRANSPLANT; HCC1926186-6 17Y 1 GASTRIC FOREIGN BODY4003465-4 10M 7 METABOLIC LIVER DISEASE6212885-5 5Y 2 S/P LIVER TRANSPLANT; GI BLEEDING4007172-2 1Y GI BLEEDING6064629-6 18Y GERD/VOMITING; UPPER GI BLEED6288309-5 3Y 8 SHORT BOWEL SYNDROME; FEVER/SEPSIS1869473-7 8M 1 INTESTINAL LYMPHOANGIOENDOTHELIOMA1772429-5 2Y 13 S/P LIVER TRANSPLANT; GI BLEEDING6249764-9 2Y CHOLESTASIS4007790-1 9M 7 GI BLEED; INTESTINAL LYMPHOANGIOENDOTHELIOMA6067526-1 11Y GERD; ESOPHAGEAL FOREIGN BODY4006968-4 2W BOWEL PERFORATION; NEONATAL CHOLESTASIS1751160-1 6Y PROTEIN LOSING ENTEROPATHY4007786-9 4M 150 BAFK; ASCITES4005076-7 18M 5 LIVER FAILURE; FEVER/SEPSIS6288449-9 2Y WISKOTT ALDRICH; INTESTINAL GVHD6245742-9 3Y 6 INTESTINAL LYMPHANGIECTASIA1875917-5 10M 12 HEMANGIOENDOTHELIOMA; CONSTIPATION1835169-2 1Y CONGENITAL CARDIAC DS; CHOLESTASIS4007953-3 8M 5 SHORT BOWEL SYNDROME; ESLD1772429-5 2Y 2 S/P LIVER TRANSPLANT; GI BLEEDING4008611-8 4Y 90 LIVER FAILURE1848781-9 5Y GI DYSMOTILITY; GERD4002748-4 3M 7 GERD; GROWTH FAILURE1751571-9 2Y 6 HYPOALBUMINEMIA6123767-3 8Y 1 CHRONIA DIARRHEA4008952-6 1Y 2 ESOPHAGEAL FOREIGN BODY4007152-4 1M CONGENITAL CARDIAC DS; GERD 12E
    • PATIENT ID NUMBER OF DAYS IN HOSPITAL GASTROENTEROLOGIC DIAGNOSISNUMBER AGE6252773-4 13Y AML; INTESTINAL GVHD6243599-5 9Y 4 ABDOMINAL PAIN1892695-6 5M 40 SHORT BOWEL SYNDROME1772429-5 2Y 5 S/P LIVER TRANSPLANT; GI BLEEDING1923699-1 6M CONGENITAL CARDIAC DS; GROWTH FAILURE4009151-4 4Y 2 PANCREATITIS1902782-0 2Y 3 PANCREATITIS; GI BLEEDING4003465-4 1Y 4 METABOLIC LIVER DISEASE4002215-4 3M 11 CHYLOUS ASCITES6177590-4 15Y 2 GI BLEEDING; LIVER FAILURE1863422-0 1Y 5 S/P SB/LIVER TRANSPLANT; FEVER/SEPSIS0985547-9 17Y RECURRENT PANCREATITIS6286682-7 5Y 3 GI BLEEDING1848781-9 5Y GI DYSMOTILITY; GERD6041773-0 15Y LIVER FAILURE; CONGENITAL HEPATIC FIBROSIS4009526-7 2W HIRSCHPRUNG’ DISEASE4010347-5 2W GALACTOSEMIA; HEPATOMEGALY6086693-6 16Y 5 ABDOMINAL PAIN; CONSTIPATION1925775-7 2Y CONGENITAL CARDIAC DS; TRANSOMINITIS6285857-6 3Y 16 SHORT BOWEL SYNDROME; FEVER/SEPSIS6264408-3 2Y 17 INTESTINAL PSEUDOOBSTRUCTION; FEVER/SEPSIS6257147-6 10Y 6 RECURRENT VOMITING; UPPER GI BLEED6148613-0 7Y 5 S/P LIVER TRANSPLANT; VARICELLA4005423-1 2M FEEDING INTOLERANCE6156803-6 10Y CYSTIC FIBROSIS; GROWTH FAILURE1921470-9 2Y ALLGILE SYNDROME6182095-7 6Y RECURRENT VOMITING; CHARGE SEQUENCE4008264-6 15Y 3 ABDOMINAL PAIN; CHRONIC PANCREATITIS1883814-4 17Y 4 S/P LIVER TRANSPLANT; ABDOMINAL PAIN 12F
    • PATIENT ID NUMBER OF DAYS IN HOSPITAL GASTROENTEROLOGIC DIAGNOSIS NUMBER AGE1827254-2 9Y CHRONIC BLOODY DIARRHEA; IBD1755262-1 2Y 3 SHORT BOWEL SYNDROME; DEHYDRATION4011760-8 6Y 3 LIVER FAILURE4008264-6 15Y 2 ABDOMINAL PAIN; CHRONIC PANCREATITIS6075611-1 10Y 6 PANCREATIC DUCT STRICTURE4010637-9 2W HYPERTRIGLYCERIDEMIA4007261-3 17Y HEART FAILURE/LIVER FAILURE4011914-1 11M 19 AUTOIMMUNE HEPATITIS1895993-2 15Y 1 SHORT BOWEL SYNDROME; S/P LIVER BIOPSY1792904-3 5Y 1 GI BLEEDING1892695-6 7M 8 SHORT BOWEL SYNDROME; FEEDING INTOLERANCE1881562-1 9M GROWTH FAILURE4013091-6 1D GI BLEEDING; TRANSAMINITIS4012397-8 1W CYSTIC FIBROSIS; SHORT BOWEL SYNDROME4009379-1 5Y 3 INTESTINAL PSEUDOOBSTRUCTION; UTI6178565-5 6Y 2 CITRULLINEMIA; S/P LIVER TX; TRANSAMINITIS4012110-5 1Y COCCIDIOMYCOSIS; GROWTH FAILURE4008730-6 2M PIERRE ROBIN; MALNUTRITION/GROWTH FAILURE1809292-4 2W CONGENITAL CARDIAC DS; TRANSAMINITIS4001084-5 1Y 4 GROWTH FAILURE/MALNUTRITION4012253-3 5M 3 GERD; DEHYDRATION4013438-9 14Y ABDOMINAL PAIN6092451-1 10Y CYSTIC FIBROSIS; C.DIFFICILE COLITIS4013817-4 3D GI BLEEDING; GASTRIC ULCER1937492-5 15Y MIXED CONNECTIVE TISSUE DS; GI DYSMOTILITY
    • 12G PATIENT ID NUMBER OF DAYS IN HOSPITAL GASTROENTEROLOGIC DIAGNOSISNUMBER AGE ABBREVIATIONS USED 1 BAFK = BILIARY ATRESIA FAILED KASAI 2 ESLD = END STAGE LIVER DISEASE 3 DS = DISEASE 4 CA = CARCINOMA 5 UPJ = URETEEROPELVIC JUNCTION 6 GT = GASTROSTOMY TUBE 7 S/P = STATIS-POST 8 CF = CYSTIC FIBROSIS 9 SB = SMALL BOWEL 10 TX = TRANSPLANT 11 GER = GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX 12 GERD = GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE 13 NEC = NECROTIZING ENTEROCOLITIS 14 HT = HEART 15 HCC = HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA 16 ALL = ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA 17 GVHD = GRAFT VS. HOST DISEASE 18 SMA = SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHY 19 IBD = INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE
    • SKILL OBJECTIVES Program Requirements Pediatric Gastroenterology, II.C 13Indicate whether or not the program provides experience in each of the following procedures. Use the same 12-month period as indicated on the previous pages. For proceduresnot performed at any of the participating hospitals, provide an explanation on a page numbered 13a. PROGRAMS MAKING NEW APPLICATION COMPLETE ONLY THECOLUMN MARKED "NUMBER PERFORMED ON SERVICE(S)" FOR EACH HOSPITAL. Inclusive Dates: FROM (mm/dd/yy): 09/01/2004 TO (mm/dd/yy): 08/31/2005 Hospital 1 Hospital 2 Hospital 3 Number Total # Number Total # Number Total # performed performed by performed performed by performed performed by on subspecialty on subspecialty on subspecialty service(s) residents service(s) residents service(s) residents 1. Colonoscopy 127 95 2. Diagnostic upper panendoscopy 402 228 3. Establishment and maintenance of patients on enteral/parenteral 45 45 nutrition (including nutritional assessment) 4. Sigmoidoscopy (rigid and flexible) 47 15 5. Paracentesis 54 54 6. Percutaneous liver biopsy 65 43 7. Rectal biopsy 4 3 8. Small bowel biopsy 175 94 9. Anorectal manometry 90 6 10. Breath hydrogen analysis 28 0 11. Dilatation of esophagus 26 11 12. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreoscopy (ERCP) 11 2 13.Therapeutic upper pandendoscopy (sclerosis of esophageal varices) 70 23 14. Esophageal manometry 3 1 15. Pancreatic stimulation test 7 2 16. Esophageal pH monitoring 44 12 17. Placement of percutaneous gastrostomy 10 21 14
    • CONTENT OF TRAINING PROGRAMComplete the following chart by providing the duration of the activities specified below for each year of the training program. Answers should be provided as indicated, i.e., inmonths, in weeks, or in other appropriate time periods. Through June 2006: First Year Second Year Third Year (if offered) 1. Clinical training 10 months 2 months 2 months Monday through Thursday Nights Monday through Thursday Nights Monday through Thursday Frequency of night call * while on service and every 4th while on service and every 4th Nights while on service and weekend weekend every 4th weekend 5 per week 5 per week 5 per week Number of clinical rounds 7 per week if on call during week 7 per week if on call during week 7 per week if on call during and weekend and weekend week and weekend 2. Research training and experience 1 Month 9 months 9 months Frequency of night call * Every 4th weekend Every 4th weekend Every 4th weekend* Evening call is taken from home 14A
    • Starting July 2007: First Year Second Year Third Year (if offered)1. Clinical training 8.5 months 2.5 months 2.5 months Monday through Thursday Nights Monday through Thursday Nights Monday through Thursday Frequency of night call * when on Transplant Service and when on Transplant Service and Nights when on Transplant every 6th weekend every 6th weekend Service and every 6th weekend 5 per week 5 per week 5 per week Number of clinical rounds 7 per week if on call during week 7 per week if on call during week 7 per week if on call during and weekend and weekend week and weekend2. Research training and experience 2.5 Months 8.5 months 8.5 months Frequency of night call * Every 6th weekend Every 6th weekend Every 6th weekend * Evening call is taken from home
    • 15 CONFERENCES Program Requirements Pediatric Gastroenterology, II.DList regular subspecialty and interdepartmental conferences, rounds, etc., that are a part of the pediatric gastroenterology training program. Identify the INSTITUTION by using the corresponding number as it appears on the first and second pages of this form. Indicate thefrequency, e.g., weekly, monthly, etc., and whether conference attendance is required (R) or optional (O). Person(s) responsible for conducting Hospital 1, Conference R, O Frequency conference 2, or 3 Pediatric G-I & Liver Meeting: review of all inpatients/admissions/procedures, R Weekly Ken Cox, M.D. 1 Q/A issues, fellowship program issues 2 (attached Liver Pathology Rounds O* Weekly Richard Sibley, M.D. to Hospital 1) nd Allison Wong, M.D. (2 Year Fellow) Pediatric G-I Pathology Rounds R Monthly 2 Terri Longacre, M.D. (Path) Pediatric G-I/Peds Surgery/Radiology Sameera Mian, M.D. (2nd Year Fellow) R Monthly 1 Conference Richard Barth, M.D. (Peds Radiology) Pediatric G-I Journal Club/JPGN R Monthly Eric Sibley, M.D. 1 Editorial Board Meeting Difficult Case Discussions R* Monthy Anca Safta, M.D. (3rd year fellow) 1 Nutrition Support Team Rounds O+ Weekly John Kerner, M.D. 1 Pediatric Liver Transplant Selection/ Outpatient Review/Inpatient Review O* Weekly William Berquist, M.D. 1 Board Review/Research Updates/ Anca Safta, M.D. (3rd Year Fellow) National Meeting Updates/Case R Weekly 1 John Kerner, M.D. Discussions Pediatric Morning Report O ** Daily Pediatric Chief Residents 1 Noon Pediatric Lecture Series O ** Daily Pediatric Chief Residents 1 Combined Basic Science/Clinical G-I Journal Club O ++ Weekly Anson Lowe, M.D. 2 Adult G-I Clinical Conference O ++ Weekly Lauren Gerson, M.D. 2 Pediatric Grand Rounds O ** Weekly Bert Glader, M.D. 1 Once Q 2-3 Mel Heyman, M.D. (based at Pediatric G-I Gut Club-Peds G-I R Months University of California, San Off site Lectures for all Bay Area Pediatric G-I Francisco) Transplantation Medicine Morbidity/ Mortality Conference O* Q. month Carlos Esquivel, M.D. 2 Gastroenterology Inpt. Rounds R Daily G-I Service Attending 1 Liver Transplant Inpt. Rounds R* Daily Liver Service Attending 1*Required when on Liver Transplant Service ++Required when fellow has to present+Required when on Nutrition Support Service **Required for any Lectures, Morning Reports, or Case Discussions where G-I, Liver, or Nutrition issues are discussed. 15aDescribe how subspecialty residents participate in these activities:
    • A variety of conferences encompassing various clinical and research aspects of pediatric gastroenterology are open to G-I residents on an optional or required basis. Active as opposed to passive participation is encouraged at all such conferences. Presentations of cases as well as discussion of patient problems is a skill which is nurtured in all trainees. For the Monday morning meeting, the pediatric G-I resident is required to present and discuss the current status of all G-I and Liver Transplant inpatients and all consults following the weekends he/she is “on call” . The third year G-I Resident coordinates the weekly Friday conference. The second year residents coordinate Pediatric G-I Pathology and G-I/Surgery/Radiology Conferences. The third year resident coordinates the “Difficult Case” Conference. The G-I residents rotate in sequence, in presenting articles at Pediatric G-I journal club. The G-I Resident presents at least one lecture/year at the Pediatric Resident’s Noon lecture Series. The G-I resident presents at least 2 times/year at Adult G-I journal club or at the Adult G-I Clinical Conference. The G-I resident is also required in the second and third year to provide regular updates on the status of their research at the Friday noon conference.What are the attendance requirements for subspecialty residents? What mechanisms are (will be) used to ensure trainee attendance atrequired conferences? To what degree is faculty attendance expected? Is this monitored? All pediatric gastroenterology resident trainees are expected to attend the required conferences. For those conferences other than Monday morning Pediatric G-I and Liver Meeting and G-I service and Liver Service Inpatient Rounds, attendance is taken. Likewise, faculty support of these conferences is expected. Sign-in sheets are retained for many of these conferences and reviewed on a semi-annual basis.
    • 16 NARRATIVE DESCRIPTIONProvide a narrative description of this subspecialty program. The points listed below should be covered in the narrative.A. PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES (Program Requirements for Subspecialties of Pediatrics) 1. Describe the educational goals and objectives of the program.Program Goals:The primary goal of the fellowship training program is the development of competent sub-specialists able to practice pediatricgastroenterology at the highest level. Following completion of the program graduates are expected to be able to:1. Care for children with both common and complicated gastrointestinal, hepatic, and nutritional disorders.2. Provide high quality consultation for children with gastrointestinal, hepatic, and nutritional complications of primary disorders involvingother organ systems.3. Perform standard gastrointestinal diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in pediatric patients.4. Design and complete a research project in an area related to the practice of pediatric gastroenterology.5. Teach the fundamentals of gastrointestinal physiology and clinical pediatric gastroenterology to medical students, residents, fellows, andpracticing physicians.6. Serve as an advocate for the availability of comprehensive and compassionate care of children with gastrointestinal, hepatic, andnutritional disorders.7. Provide administrative leadership in the organization of an academic and/or clinical pediatric gastroenterology practice using knowledgeof current trends in healthcare funding.8. Obtains subspecialty certification by the Sub-Board of Pediatric Gastroenterology by performing satisfactorily on the certifyingexamination. Phase I Clinical TrainingThe goal of the first year is to establish a solid foundation of clinical knowledge and experience so that the fellow canfunction independently in the care of patients with gastrointestinal disorders. The curriculum designed to achieve this goalconsists of several key parts. The inpatient and outpatient rotations form the base of this curriculum built on goals,expectations and the six ACGME competencies. A conference in pathology and a conference in radiology complement thepatient care rotations. Next, a series of didactic lectures and journal clubs provide a solid knowledge base and raise thesophistication of the fellow’s critical thought process, which serves them in evaluating clinical data and in formulating plansfor managing patients. Each first year fellow prepares and presents a journal club presentation on a regular basis(alternating with the second and third year fellow). The forum provides an opportunity for the faculty to teach the fellowsmethods for critically evaluating papers in the literature.1. Inpatient Service a. Goals: • Develop an understanding and commitment to the respectful treatment of patients, their families and professional colleagues. • Improve the skill of history-taking and the ability to perform a comprehensive and accurate physical exam. In particular, the fellows will develop competence in the history and physical exam findings relating to digestive diseases. • Gain knowledge and skills pertaining to the psychosocial and ethical issues of medicine. • Learn to arrive at an appropriate differential diagnosis, to develop a relevant plan for targeted investigation, including the appropriate use of procedures, and to formulate a plan for age-appropriate and cost-effective management of treatment and follow-up of the patient. • Defend the differential diagnosis and treatment management plan. • Develop the ability to effectively present the results of a consultation orally and as a referral letter. • Increase the core fund of knowledge in gastrointestinal development, physiology, pathophysiology, molecular biology, genetics, immunology, biochemistry, nutrition, and clinical pharmacology. • Gain skills in diagnosing illnesses in acutely and chronically ill hospitalized patients. • Learn appropriate and cost-effective management of hospitalized patients • Acquire experience in the gastrointestinal and nutritional complications of critically ill patients in the Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and in the complications of gastrointestinal diseases that make patients critically ill. • Learn pre-operative care and management of liver and intestinal transplant patients. • Learn the indications and contraindications for parenteral and enteral nutrition and how to establish and maintain parenteral and enteral nutrition. • Develop skills in the management and leadership of multidisciplinary teams.
    • b. Expectations: • The fellow is responsible for each patient admitted to the gastroenterology service and for each consult. • The fellow is responsible for helping the resident assign patients to the pediatric intern on the gastroenterology rotation. The pediatric intern can pre-round on those patients. • The fellow rounds with the attending each day. • While on the Gastroenterology Inpatient Service, the fellow is primarily responsible for seeing all initial consults on the wards. Some of the consults should be assigned to residents or medical students rotating on the gastroenterology service. Each consult should be seen as soon as possible but no later than 24 hours after the request. Accept the request for consultation with enthusiasm and gratitude. Avoid arrogance. The reason for the consult may be off the mark, but we should still strive to make a valuable contribution to that patient’s care. • The fellow is responsible for communicating and explaining care plans to the Pediatric residents. The fellow should talk directly with the residents caring for the patients. It is important to include medical students in these discussions. Fellows do not enter orders for any patient covered by the housestaff. Occasionally, the fellow will be asked to complete admission orders (i.e., post percutaneous gastrostomy placement orders). • The fellow writes/dictates a daily note on each consult patient. Fellows are expected to write a daily note on our patients in the ICU. Patients on our own gastroenterology service and on the transplant service generally have notes written by either the intern, covering resident, or nurse practitioner (on some transplant patients). However, if the intern is post-call and the resident is off for the day, the fellow is expected to write the progress note for the day. • Every time the service stops following a patient, a sign-off note must be placed in the chart. • The fellow should dictate a discharge note on all service patients and on selected consult patients who require follow-up in the gastroenterology outpatient clinic. • The fellow performs any procedures on inpatients. After the procedure, the fellow must enter post-op orders into the chart and complete the procedural note within 24 hours of the procedure. • The fellow actively contributes to the education of residents and medical students. • When the fellow goes off the inpatient service, he or she is responsible for providing the fellow coming on service with a summary of the inpatients’ histories, hospital courses and treatment or diagnostic plans.c. Objectives: i. PATIENT CARE 1. Perform complete, timely histories and physical exams on hospitalized patients with gastrointestinal complaints. 2. Communicate your findings in a complete, written note and orally present the patient in a concise manner. 3. Order appropriate labs, procedures and imaging studies for patients with gastrointestinal diseases. 4. Initiate appropriate therapy. 5. Initiate appropriate parenteral or enteral nutrition. 6. Perform esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy, and other procedures. ii. MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE 1. Establish a differential diagnosis, evaluation plan and management plan for common signs and symptoms of gastrointestinal diseases. 2. Interpret laboratory and imaging studies. 3. Recommend endoscopic procedures on the basis of personal consultation and consideration of specific indications, contraindications, and diagnostic and therapeutic alternatives. 4. Recognize common gastrointestinal pathology viewed during endoscopy. 5. Understand the pharmacology, indications, age-appropriate dosages and side effects of commonly prescribed medications iii. PRACTICE-BASED LEARNING AND IMPROVEMENT 1. Locate and appraise scientific evidence and clinical studies related to the patient’s health problems. 2. Use information technology including online resources. 3. Attend local conferences and seminars. 4. Attend weekly teaching session for fellows. iv. INTERPERSONAL AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS 1. Communicate well and work effectively with residents, fellows, attendings, consultants, nursing staff, ancillary staff and social services.
    • 2. Maintain professional and empathetic behavior towards parents in the stressful setting of the hospital. 3. Effectively communicate home care instructions, including medication usage and follow-up to families. 4. Deliver through and appropriate sign out when going off service. 5. Communicate with the referring physician. v. PROFESSIONALISM 1. Arrive on time for rounds, procedures, conferences and meetings. 2. Arrange coverage if unable to meet your scheduled commitments. 3. Maintain patient confidentiality. 4. Demonstrate sensitivity and respect for cultural diversity of patients. 5. Demonstrate respect for co-workers and ancillary staff. vi. SYSTEMS-BASED PRACTICE 1. Demonstrate awareness and understanding of the capacity of the hospital system to provide timely care. 2. Understand the requirements of insurers and managed care organizations for referral and payment of hospital services. 3. Utilize ancillary staff appropriately. 4. Understand billing and coding for in-patients. 5. Know the cost effectiveness of commonly used diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to gastrointestinal diseases.2. Outpatient Service During this rotation the fellow will spend time in various outpatient clinics and the ambulatory procedure unit (APU). The exact schedule may vary from year to year and will be provided to the fellow at the start of the year.Outpatient Clinics a. Goals: • Develop an understanding and commitment to the respectful treatment of patients, their families and professional colleagues • Improve the skill of history-taking and the ability to perform a comprehensive and accurate physical exam. In particular, the fellows will develop particular competence in the history and physical exam findings related to digestive diseases. • Gain knowledge and skills pertaining to the psychosocial and ethical issues of medicine. • Learn to arrive at an appropriate differential diagnosis, to develop a relevant plan for targeted investigation, including the appropriate use of procedures, and to formulate a plan for age-appropriate and cost effective management of treatment and follow-up of the patient. • Defend the differential diagnosis and management plan. • Develop the ability to effectively present the results of a consultation orally and as a referral letter. • Increase the core fund of knowledge in gastrointestinal development, physiology, pathophysiology, molecular biology, genetics, immunology, biochemistry, nutrition and clinical pharmacology. b. Expectations: • Attend regularly scheduled clinics including the liver transplant clinics. • See at least one new patient each session. The G-I resident may also see return patients at the responsible attending’s discretion. • Introduce yourself to the family and the patient. • Take a complete history and perform a complete physical exam. • Discuss the patient with the responsible attending. During this discussion, the fellow should present their assessment and plan for evaluation or treatment. • Return to see the patient and family with the attending. • Complete the visit encounter sheet and order any procedures, laboratory tests or radiology tests. • Dictate a letter to the referring physician. c. Objectives: (These overlap with the objectives for the In-Patient rotation.) i. PATIENT CARE 1. Perform complete, timely histories and physical exams on referred patients with gastrointestinal complaints.
    • 2. Communicate your findings in a complete, written note and orally present the patient in a concise manner. 3. Order appropriate labs, procedures and imaging studies for patients with gastrointestinal diseases. 4. Initiate appropriate therapy. 5. Plan appropriate follow-up. ii. MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE 1. Establish a differential diagnosis, evaluation plan and management plan for common signs and symptoms of gastrointestinal diseases. 2. Interpret laboratory and imaging studies. 3. Recommend endoscopic procedures on the basis of personal consultation and consideration of specific indications, contraindications, and diagnostic and therapeutic alternatives. 4. Understand the pharmacology, indications, age-appropriate dosages and side effects of commonly prescribed medications. iii. PRACTICE-BASED LEARNING AND IMPROVEMENT 1. Locate and appraise scientific evidence and clinical studies related to the patient’s health problems. 2. Use information technology including online resources. 3. Attend local conferences and seminars. 4. Attend weekly teaching session for fellows. iv. INTERPERSONAL AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS 1. Communicate well and work effectively with residents, fellows, attendings, consultants, nursing staff, ancillary staff and social services. 2. Maintain professional and empathetic behavior towards parents. 3. Effectively communicate home care instructions, including medication usage and follow-up to families. 4. Communicate with the referring physician. v. PROFESSIONALISM 1. Arrive on time for the out-patient clinic. 2. Block your schedule when you will be out of the office before patients are scheduled. 3. Maintain patient confidentiality. 4. Demonstrate sensitivity and respect for cultural diversity of patients. 5. Demonstrate respect for co-workers and ancillary staff. vi. SYSTEMS-BASED PRACTICE 1. Demonstrate awareness and understanding of the capacity of the hospital system to provide timely care. 2. Understand the requirements of insurers and managed care organizations for referral and payment of outpatient services. 3. Understand billing and coding for outpatients. 4. Utilize ancillary staff appropriately. 5. Know the cost effectiveness of commonly used diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to gastrointestinal diseases.3. Ambulatory Procedure Unit (APU) a. Goals: • Learn the specific indications and contraindications of each procedure. • Understand the diagnostic and therapeutic alternatives to each procedure. • Learn to counsel the family and patient on all aspects of the procedure. • Learn to select and apply appropriate sedation as indicated. • Be able to identify age and problem-appropriate endoscopy equipment. • Learn to interpret and describe endoscopic findings accurately. • Integrate endoscopic findings or therapy into the management plan. • Understand the inherent risks of endoscopic procedures. • Recognize and manage complications. • Recognize personal and procedural limits and know when to request assistance. • Be familiar with standards for cleaning and maintaining endoscopic equipment. • Diagnostic Procedures
    • o Upper panendoscopy with biopsy and brushings o Colonoscopy with biopsy o Flexible sigmoidoscopy o Percutaneous liver biopsy o Rectal suction biopsy o Esophageal pH monitoring o Esophageal manometry o Breath hydrogen analysis • Therapeutic Procedures o Foreign body removal o Esophageal stricture dilatation o Colonic stricture dilatation o Polypectomy o Control of variceal bleeding o ERCP (observation only) o Achalasia dilatations o Endoscopic hemostasis o Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomyb. Expectations: • Meet the family and complete the pre-procedure paperwork including orders for the procedure, the consent for the procedure, and any required physical exam. • Discuss sedation/general anesthesia with Anesthesia attending. • Perform the procedure under the guidance of the attending. In most cases, the fellow will observe several procedures at the start of the year. • Complete the documentation of the procedure including the dictation of the procedure • Communicate the findings to the family after the procedure with the guidance of the attending physician. The fellows communicate pathology results only to patients they have personally seen.c. Objectives: (These overlap with the objectives for previous rotations.) vii. PATIENT CARE 1. Order appropriate pre-procedure labs and imaging studies. 2. Insure that the patient’s physical exam and consent meet the requirements of the procedure suite policies. 3. Communicate your findings in a complete, written note. 4. Initiate appropriate therapy based on endoscopic findings and history. 5. Plan appropriate follow-up. viii. MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE 1. Know how to set-up for endoscopy and clean the equipment after the procedure. 2. Be familiar with the JCAHO standards for quality improvement and infection control. 3. Know the characteristics of the different endoscopes. 4. Recommend endoscopic procedures on the basis of personal consultation and consideration of specific indications, contraindications, and diagnostic and therapeutic alternatives. 5. Interpret and describe endoscopic findings accurately. 6. Establish a differential diagnosis, evaluation plan and management plan for common endoscopic findings. 7. Understand the inherent risks of endoscopic procedures and be able to recognize and manage complications. ix. PRACTICE-BASED LEARNING AND IMPROVEMENT 1. Locate and appraise scientific evidence and clinical studies related to gastrointestinal procedures. 2. Use information technology including online resources. 3. Attend local conferences and seminars. 4. Attend weekly teaching session for fellows. x. INTERPERSONAL AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS 1. Communicate well and work effectively with residents, fellows, attendings, consultants, nursing staff, ancillary staff and social services. 2. Maintain professional and empathetic behavior towards parents.
    • 3. Effectively communicate home care instructions, including medication usage and follow-up to families. 4. Communicate with the referring physician. xi. PROFESSIONALISM 1. Arrive on time for the procedure. 2. Maintain patient confidentiality. 3. Demonstrate sensitivity and respect for cultural diversity of patients. 4. Demonstrate respect for co-workers and ancillary staff. xii. SYSTEMS-BASED PRACTICE 1. Demonstrate awareness and understanding of the capacity of the hospital system to provide timely care. 2. Understand the requirements of insurers and managed care organizations for referral and payment of procedures. 3. Understand billing and coding for procedures. 4. Utilize ancillary staff appropriately.4. Pathology RoundsThe Department of Pathology provides a weekly pathology session that covers Hepatology pathology. Both adult andpediatric cases are reviewed. Gastrointestinal pathology is reviewed monthly and only pediatric G-I cases are reviewed.The designated pathologist on-service will be responsible for the oversight of the fellow. a. Goals: • Advance their understanding of the anatomy and histology of the gastrointestinal tract and related organs in children. • Appreciate the role of biopsy in clinical practice. • Understand the strengths and weakness of biopsy specimens. • Become familiar with microscopic patterns of common pediatric disorders • Develop an appreciation for the workings of a pathology department • Widen their appreciation for the cost/benefit ratio of a variety of pathology-based tests. b. Expectations: • Review slides with the appropriate pathologist. • Acquire additional clinical information as needed. • Self study with teaching sets, slides, kodachromes, and books. Phase II Research TrainingDuring the second and third years of the program, fellows pursue original research by contributing to scientific laboratorystudies or to a clinical investigation or other approved scholarly pursuit. Through discussions with the first year fellow, theprogram director and associate director (in charge of research) identify the path the fellow wishes to pursue and determinethe most appropriate strategy to reach that goal given the fellow’s background and past experience. The associateprogram director will counsel the fellow in the choice of research mentors, and will insure that the fellow is ready to initiatetheir work at the conclusion of the first year. a. Goals: • Learn to formulate a working hypothesis. • Acquire skill in designing and performing appropriate experiments. • Strengthen ability to critically assess data. • Learn to formulate concise conclusions from complex problems. • Learn how to analyze data using appropriate statistical tests. • Develop presentation skills. • Begin to develop grant writing skills. b. Expectations: • Conduct laboratory-based or clinical hypothesis- or discovery-driven research project. • Attend weekly fellow’s clinic.
    • • Attend course on research ethics. • Develop presentation skills. o Present at lab meetings o Present work at national meeting o Write at least one manuscript for submission to a journal • Learn the skills required for the fellow to succeed in an academic career. c. Objectives: • Develop an appreciation for scientific inquiry. • Develop a critical understanding of the current literature. • Understand the principles of the scientific method. • Understand basic statistical and power calculations. • Understand the concepts of research ethics. • Develop skills at oral and written presentation of scientific work. • Begin to learn the skills for grant preparation.2. Are the goals and objectives documented in writing and available for review? Are they provided to the resident? The goals and objectives of the training program in pediatric gastroenterology are documented in writing. They are discussed with applicants to the program and provided to those who are accepted as trainees.3. Describe how the goals and objectives are reviewed and revised. Describe the role of the resident and the faculty in this process. The goals and objectives are reviewed on an annual basis and revised according to input from the trainees and the faculty. Input from the trainees and the faculty are solicited on an annual basis by means of a formal written evaluation. These evaluations are returned in a confidential manner to Dr. Kerner.B. RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER PROGRAMS 1. What are the differences in responsibilities for the subspecialty residents at each level of training from those of the pediatric residents? G-I residents have completed their pediatric residency training and are expected to possess the skills of a board certified pediatrician. Trainees are expected to assume responsibility above and beyond that expected of the pediatric residents; in addition to displaying competence in the management of complex children with gastrointestinal, hepatic, and nutrition disorders, trainees are expected to master all the major pediatric gastroenterology procedures. The pediatric residents are the primary physicians for all LPCH inpatients: they each generally carry a load of 8-10 inpatients. The G-I resident has primary responsibility for supervising G-I service inpatients – such supervision includes appropriate teaching of these residents. Additionally, the G-I resident serves as the primary consultant for all requested G-I consults from other services and communicates the G-I service’s recommendations to the residents. 2. How are patients assigned or apportioned between the pediatric residents and those in this subspecialty program? The pediatric PL1 and PL2 residents are responsible for primary management of all gastroenterology inpatients, some* pre-liver transplant hepatology patients and pre small bowel transplant patients, and some liver transplant patients readmitted to the hospital for medical issues. The G-I resident serves as the primary supervisor of all these patients; in addition, the G-I resident is responsible for all consultations to the G-I service from any inpatient service (PICU, NICU, General Pediatric Wards). * The PNP on the inpatient service is primary provider for the remainder of those patients. 3. How are those in this subspecialty program involved with other pediatric subspecialty residents, other clinics, departments and accredited residency programs? Trainees in the subspecialty program interact with a wide variety of physicians and scientists. They serve as consultants to all of the pediatric subspecialties. They take many private pediatrician phone consultations. There are continuous interactions with G-I trainees and trainees of other pediatric divisions at the weekly Pediatric Grand Rounds, the Noon Lecture Series, and Morning Report for LPCH. Pediatric G-I trainees also are able to meet the Adult G-I trainees at the Adult G-I run journal club and the G-I Clinical Conference. Further, in complex cases on the ward, there are frequent care conferences involving several subspecialty services. These conferences further enable the trainees of the respective divisions to interact. The trainee also interacts frequently with the Pediatric Surgery service – in consultation, in care conferences, and in procedures done jointly. The trainee has similar interaction with the Adult G-I service – particularly in procedures done jointly (e.g., ERCP).
    • 4. How are the subspecialty residents involved in the education of pediatric residents and medical students? While on the clinical service, the trainee is closely involved in the teaching of medical students and residents. Such teaching occurs both in the clinic and on the ward and includes both informal presentations of salient points relevant to the education of the two groups and bedside teaching. Trainees oversee and critique pediatric residents at all levels of training, including pediatric residents on G-I elective, as well as any medical students on G-I elective. All of our trainees participate in formal didactic teaching of pediatric residents and students – giving lectures in the pediatric residents’ Noon Lecture Series and presenting and discussing cases in the Pediatric residents’ Morning Report.C. SPECIALTY EXPERIENCES (Refer to the requirements and describe how they are covered in the program) We follow as closely as possible the published guidelines for residency education in pediatric gastroenterology as established by the ACGME in July 2002. Our program differs in that we also provide a broad experience in liver and small bowel transplantation. 1. Provide a general description of each year of training.
    • The overall goal of the subspecialty Residency (fellowship) in Pediatric Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics,Stanford University School of Medicine is to train physicians to achieve excellence in the practice of clinical pediatricgastroenterology, in scholarly basic science or clinical research, and in medical education. The goals of this program areachieved over the course of three years of training. Briefly:A. G-I residents accept graduated responsibility in the care of children with gastrointestinal, hepatic, and nutritional disorders while under the direct supervision of a board certified (or in 1 case board eligible) pediatric gastroenterologist while rotating through the gastroenterology inpatient service, the liver transplant inpatient service, the inpatient nutrition support service, the outpatient clinics of gastroenterology and liver transplant, and elective experiences in pediatric radiology and pediatric pathology. This responsibility includes patient care, parent conferences, consultations with other subspecialists, night and weekend call, and interfacing with the many services which interact with pediatric gastroenterology, nutrition, and liver and small bowel transplant.B. The first year of the residency will be primarily clinical in nature, during which the resident will become trained in the evaluation and management of children with diseases of the gastrointestinal system and their nutritional consequences. During the course of the first year, the resident will be introduced to the ongoing G-I and liver research programs at Stanford so that by the end of the year the resident will be able to select a research area to pursue. The second and third years will be devoted primarily to scholarly work in the field of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, but the resident will continue to participate in the clinical activities of the Division to the appropriate degree to maintain and hone clinical skills. After completion of the fellowship, the resident will have met the requirements for board eligibility in Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition set forth by the American Board of Pediatrics.C. With the successful funding of the combined Stanford-UCSF NIH NIDDK Training Grant, the G-I residents were exposed to diverse research possibilities, both basic science and clinical in focus, at both the Stanford and UCSF campuses. Even though the grant is no longer active, G-I fellows still may utilize mentors at UCSF. There continues to be many mentors for both clinical and basic science research here at Stanford. Submission of research for presentation at meetings is actively supported, and application for grant support is encouraged. All residents are required to show evidence of meaningful scholarly work prior to leaving the program as a requirement for board certification.D. To encourage the development of teaching skills, G-I resident participation is required at the weekly Pediatric G-I Journal Club/Case Discussion/Board Review meeting. In addition, the resident presents 1-2 times/year at the combined Adult G-I journal club (also a weekly event). The G-I resident also will present 1 of the 4 “Board Review Lectures” in Gastroenterology at the Noon Lecture Series designed for pediatric housestaff and students.The program permits the achievement of the above goals by providing:1) extensive 1:1 supervision by Pediatric Gastroenterology faculty while on clinical services.2) a broad based experience with pediatric gastroenterology patients that span the entire spectrum of varied and complex diseases in the field; the volume of patients is sufficiently great to ensure that the subspecialty residents (fellows) have the opportunity to become clinically competent in the management of common as well as uncommon gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, and pancreatic diseases in patients ranging from infancy through young adulthood.3) a consult service that provides expert evaluation of the gastrointestinal manifestations of a broad spectrum of pediatric illnesses.4) the PRECEPT program that provides two years of courses (usually started in the G-I resident’s 2nd year) aimed at thesubspecialty resident (fellow) to enhance their knowledge of: • Biostatistics • Clinical Epidemiology • Design and Conduct of Clinical Trials • Preparation of Manuscripts and Grants • Teaching & Presentation Skills • Critical Appraisal of the Literature • Ethics & Responsible Conduct of Research • Practical Course on Molecular Biology Techniques • Reading, Writing & Reviewing the Scientific Literature
    • 172. Inpatient experiences a. What responsibilities do the subspecialty residents have for inpatients requiring acute and chronic care in appropriate facilities when assigned to inpatient services? When on the clinical service, the trainee has primary responsibility for the Pediatric Gastroenterology Service patients on the wards at LPCH. Duties include supervision and teaching of the pediatric housestaff and students who are assigned to our service’s patients. Daily rounds will be made with the on-service faculty attending. Significant time is also spent interfacing with patients, their parents, and the nursing staff. The trainee is also the first person called when consultation is requested from the G-I service for any LPCH inpatients, and he/she must perform that consult (with faculty input) in a timely manner. The trainee also serves as the front-line liaison to the community and referring physicians who have patient care questions or possible referrals to the G-I Service. Responsibility is doled out in a graduated fashion based on the accumulated experience of the trainee. b. How and by whom are they supervised? The G-I resident is supervised 1:1 by one of the full time board certified (or in one case, Board-eligible) gastroenterologists while on the inpatient service. The G-I resident’s clinical skills can be assessed by observing their knowledge of patients and proposed work-up and plans that are discussed on daily work rounds. c. How many hours per week do they participate in rounds with faculty? Describe this experience. Gastroenterology residents participate in inpatient morning work rounds five days per week, and seven days per week on the weekend that the resident is “on call.” These rounds last an average of two to three hours per day (10-15 hrs./wk in a 5-day week 14-18 hrs./wk in a 7-day week). The G-I resident functions as a Junior Attending on these Rounds. Rounds start with “sit down” rounds, where the pediatric residents, G-I resident, and G-I faculty review the previous days events of each patient via chart review, reports from housestaff based on their pre-rounding on patients, review of labs by accessing the ward’s computer, and review of nursing records and direct input from the “charge nurse” of each unit where the G-I service has primary patients. A tentative plan for the day is devised. The team then goes bedside to bedside on all G-I inpatients, with physical exams as needed, and the plan for the day is finalized and discussed with the patient and their family. The G-I resident is responsible for informal teaching of the pediatric residents during these rounds. This teaching is supervised and embellished where necessary by the full-time G-I faculty member. For the last two years, we have had two first year G-I residents (fellows). The inpatient service has, thus, been divided into 2 separate services: 1) Gastroenterology including all G-I consultations; 2) Transplant – Liver and Small Bowel. A physician assistant (PA) is the primary caregiver for “fresh transplants” (those immediately post-operative). Our division’s two nurse practitioners alternate as primary caregivers for patients being evaluated for liver or small bowel transplant and for some of the re-admits of liver or small bowel transplant patients. The rest of those re-admits and all the G-I inpatients have an assigned pediatric resident as primary caregiver. The G-I resident acts as a Junior Attending for the new evaluations and re-admits on the Transplant Service and for all G-I patients on the Gastroenterology Service. There are two inpatient Attendings – one on the Gastroenterology/consult service and one on the Transplant Service. The first year G-I residents rotate for 16 weeks on each service (32 weeks total in 1 year). The second and third year subspecialty residents cover the rest of the weeks.3. Outpatient experiences a. What degree of responsibility do the residents have for required outpatient care? The trainee attends the G-I clinic weekly all year for each of his/her three years – two to four clinics/week (half-day clinics) the first year. 1 clinic/week the second year, and 1 clinic/week the third year. The trainee sees both new referral and established patients. They completely evaluate the patient, develop diagnostic and treatment plans and presents each case to a full-time Pediatric G-I faculty member to formulate a final impression and plan. The trainee is directly responsible for dictating a patient care letter to be sent to the referring physician. They are also responsible for communication with the families seen in the continuity clinic after the visit. The trainee includes the responsible attending in all communications. b. Describe the continuity of care experience they receive during their period of assignment to the outpatient clinic. To what extent do they have the opportunity to provide outpatient care for patients whom they treated on the inpatient service? The continuity of care experience is superb. Since the fellows are in clinic all year for all three years, they are able to follow some patients for their full three-year experience. They are able to provide outpatient care for patients they treated on the inpatient service in their weekly continuity clinic. The service’s goal is to try to have one primary physician (trainee) for each of the more complex cases. c.How and by whom are they supervised during the provision of outpatient care?
    • The outpatient clinic experience is supervised solely by the eight full-time G-I faculty who review each case seen by the trainee on a one-to-one basis. d. How do subspecialty residents have the opportunity to provide outpatient care for patients whom they treated on the inpatient service? See 3b. Even when on elective or on research time, the G-I resident can schedule patients he/she has seen as an inpatient for his/her outpatient clinic (since they always have a minimum of one clinic per week for all three years of training).4. Other a. Describe any special sessions/coursework/special laboratory experiences in which the residents participate.
    • The trainees have the unique opportunity to attend a three day symposium, “Advances in Perinatal and PediatricNutrition,” held every other year at Stanford. This course is directed by Dr. Kerner. July 2005 was the 17th year of thishighly successful conference. The faculty are prominent figures in the field of nutrition, many with national or eveninternational reputations. The course is a multidisciplinary one and attracts physicians, nutritionists, nurses, andpharmacists. The course has attracted approximately 400 registrants per year. For the last nine symposia, Dr. Kernerhas received Educational Grants from Nestle’s Nutrition Division to help keep costs low for registrants.The Pediatric Gastroenterology Resident has the unique opportunity to participate in Stanford University School ofMedicine’s didactic PRECEPT program. PRECEPT stands for: Principles of Research in Biostatistics, Epidemiology,Study Design and Ethics for Clinicians to Enhance Postdoctoral Training. GOALS & OBJECTIVES To enhance clinical scientists’ knowledge of: • Biostatistics • Clinical Epidemiology • Design and Conduct of Clinical Trails • Preparation of Manuscripts and Grants • Teaching and Presentation Skills • Critical Appraisal of the Literature • Ethics and Responsible Conduct of Research • Practical Course on Molecular Biology Techniques • Reading, Writing and Reviewing the Scientific LiteratureCurriculum Structure and OrganizationOne of eight major topic areas will be offered each academic quarter. The total curriculum will be covered in eightquarters; thus, major topic areas will be repeated every two years. Lectures and small group discussions will be heldalternately, one evening per week; each session being 60 to 90 minutes in length. The discussion sessions will focus onpractical application of material presented in lectures. Enrollment each quarter will be restricted to 100 participants sothat small discussion groups do not exceed 15 individuals. Syllabus material will be provided to all who enroll.Stanford/Packard Center for Transitional Research in Medicine (SPCTRM) has developed several courses to enhance thecurriculum provided by PRECEPT. • “Intensive Course in Clinical Research: Study Design and Performance” was launched in September 2006. One subspecialty resident per year from our program can attend this course. Since the program is sponsored by SPCTRM/CHRP (Child Health Research Program)/HRP (Health Research and Policy) and the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health and the Pediatric Research Fund, no cost is incurred by our division. • ‘Biostatistics 102” and “Data Visualization” are 2 additional courses run by SPCTRM.Stanford Lane Library in the Laneconnex Knowledge Management Center also offers valuable classes for subspecialtyresidents such as “Power Point Level 1 and Level 2,” “End Note: Creating Bibliographies and Customizing BibliographyStyles,” “Writing for Medical Journals,” and “Writing the NIH Grant.”The flexibility of the residency program also allows trainees to take “electives” when not on the inpatientclinical service. Such electives include one month blocks on the Adult G-I inpatient service to help understandthe natural progression of diseases presenting in childhood (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease); extra timedoing Adult Endoscopy with a focus on ERCP and esophageal dilatation; one month caring for inpatients andoutpatients with cystic fibrosis (Dr. Richard Moss serves as the supervisor). Other electives exist in PediatricPathology and Pediatric Radiology.
    • 18 b. How are psycho-social aspects of medicine and ethical issues related to this subspecialty taught to the residents? Psychosocial issues are addressed formally in lectures in our Friday noon conference, Pediatric Grand Rounds, and Psychiatry Grand Rounds. Informal one-to-one discussions occur with the service’s two assigned social workers and the child psychologist. Since many of our complex patients have major psychosocial concerns, there are multiple care conferences attended by the trainee, appropriate G-I faculty, other subspecialists, the assigned social worker, child psychologist and/or child psychiatrist, and other ancillary staff. These care conferences are the prime source for the trainee to gain an appreciation of both psychosocial and ethical issues related to chronic gastrointestinal disorders. Stanford University Medical School also has a regularly scheduled lecture series on ethical issues in medicine. Further, our hospital has an Ethics Committee that reviews patient care when ethical concerns are raised in particular patients. Our subspecialty residents take part in these patient reviews. c.Describe the residents instruction and experience in the administration of a pediatric gastroenterology facility. The subspecialty residents learn how the pediatric gastroenterology facility is administered by attending our weekly divisional meetings where such issues are discussed. At the beginning of each year, when the new subspecialty residents begin the program, they are shown the responsibilities of the administrative staff for subspecialty residents. They become fluent in ordering all diagnostic tests and in scheduling patients for procedures and for clinic. In the second and third year the trainee receives exposure to the skills required to administrate a pediatric gastroenterology program. The trainee participates in the division’s active quality assurance and quality improvement programs. The trainee also helps coordinate aspects of the division’s major nutrition course. He/she is also actively involved in the interview process and subsequent selection of future fellows. One of our second year gastroenterology residents was very active in gathering and collating data for this accreditation form. The trainee also participates in critical evaluation of the residency curriculum, and some trainees actually help rewrite the description of the residency program. One second year G-I resident coordinates our monthly pediatric G-I pathology teaching conference. Our other second year G-I resident coordinates our monthly pediatric surgery/pediatric G-I/radiology conference. Our third year G-I resident coordinates our weekly Friday noon teaching conference and our monthly “Difficult Cases” conference. One of our first year G-I residents (James Lue) has been very active in Quality Improvement—he is taking an active role on a committee working with senior LPCH leadership to improve the hospital’s main information system (CERNER).D. RESEARCH PROGRAM (Program Requirements for Subspecialties of Pediatrics, V) 1. Is the program director directly involved in a research program? He has served as a mentor for G-I residents involved in clinical research. He has consistently had private funding for clinical research (see his C.V.). His research interest is in the area of neonatal and childhood nutrition and nutrition support. 2. Are other faculty in this subspecialty actively engaged in a research program? Yes. 3. How does the program ensure a meaningful supervised research experience for the residents, beginning in their first year and extending throughout their training? Include a description of how they learn experimental design, data collection and analysis, and laboratory techniques used in this subspecialty research. Include the plans for frequency and duration of these sessions and the year of training in which they occur. Identify the teacher/supervisor in each case. Our program is mainly designed for training G-I residents who wish to pursue an academic career in pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition. Therefore, heavy emphasis is placed on research training from the beginning of the first year. With the constant focus on research, we hope that the trainee can develop enough skills, experience and independence in pediatric gastroenterology/nutrition research so that he or she can establish an independent research and be competitive for independent grant funding. Once a trainee selects a School of Medicine faculty members as his research preceptor, the trainee becomes a full-fledged member of that research group. In consultation with the G-I residency program associate director for research, the trainee also establishes a Scholarly Oversight Committee (two additional faculty members) to track progress during the research experience. In consultation with the G-I residency program director, a plan for attending didactic courses and seminars is also developed for each trainee. Directly available to Pediatric G-I residents are facilities and expertise in the Beckman Center for Center for Molecular and Genetic Medicine as well as courses in basic science, study design, and data analysis. Such formal courses are offered to postdoctoral trainees in the School of Medicine to augment the one-on-one teaching that occurs between training and faculty members and include “Responsible Conduct of Research”, “Design and Conduct of Clinical Research Trials”, and “Epidemiology and Biostatistics for the Clinical Research Scientist”.
    • The research mentor for the trainee is directly responsible for teaching the trainee laboratory techniques or clinical research methods used in gastroenterology research. Many of these encounters are one-on-one with the faculty member; some select techniques may be delegated to expert post-doctorate staff or to experienced laboratory technicians. The first year of research training is designed to give a trainee without extensive scientific background a closely supervised and guided experience. The research in the second year is expected to be more focused and independent, although still closely supervised. The research in the third year is expected to be much more independent, and guidance is given in the skills of planning an independent research career and applying for funding. The research laboratories generally have weekly meetings of the whole staff including the faculty preceptor, students, technicians, and the trainee. Here the trainee comes to understand the overall objectives of the laboratory and learns valuable pointers in data collection, study design, and interpretation of results. The trainee’s supervisor is the contributing faculty member whom he/she has chosen for a mentor. The Department of Pediatrics now has research seminars twice a month to further the G-I residents’ knowledge in designing research protocols. 4. How do they receive support and guidance in the preparation of manuscripts and presentations? Trainees receive support and guidance in the preparation of manuscripts and presentations directly from their faculty preceptor. Secretarial assistance is provided through the G-I division for manuscript preparation. Before major meetings (Western Society for Pediatric Research, Society for Pediatric Research, Digestive Disease Week, etc.) several Pediatric divisions, as well as the Adult G-I division (separately), get together to listen to “first draft” presentations for these meetings by junior faculty and trainees. Constructive criticism is offered and subsequently, a “dress rehearsal” for presentations at the meeting follows the following week (with easier to understand slides, more succinct introductions, clearer presentation of findings, etc.). 5. Describe research facilities, space and equipment directly related to this subspecialty program and the residents research activity. The Pediatric Gastroenterology, Liver disease and Nutrition Division has active basic and clinical science research programs based in approximately 900 square feet of dedicated laboratory space including a dedicated tissue culture facility. The laboratories are fully equipped to conduct state-of-the-art studies in the biochemistry and molecular biology of the intestine. In addition, physiologically-based investigations of absorptive function, including nutrient malabsorption using trace gas analysis, are also routinely conducted (Dr. Castillo). In addition to the core laboratory space dedicated to the Pediatric Gastroenterology Division, there are two large Departmental Common Room laboratories containing liquid scintillation counters, ultracentrifuges with assorted rotors, gamma counters, spectrophotometers, centrifuges and freezers, all available to the GI resident. Drs. Sibley and Bass are Research Base Investigator and Associate Member respectively of the NIH-funded Digestive Disease Center at Stanford, headed by Drs. Harry Greenberg and Bishr Omary. The Center provides direct access to core laboratories headed by international authorities in these fields: FACS/Antibody production core facility (headed by Dr. Eugene Butcher), Animal Imaging and Physiology core (headed by Dr. Chris Contag), Proteomics/Genomics core (headed by Dr. David Relman), and a Cell imaging core (headed by Dr. Stanley Falkow). GI residents have direct access to these core laboratories as well as to expertise required for using the facilities of these laboratories. Also directly available to Pediatric GI residents are facilities and expertise in the Beckman Center for Molecular and Genetic Medicine (headed by Dr. Lucy Shapiro) as well as courses I n basic science, study design and data analysis. 6. List active research projects in this subspecialty. Include the title of the project, the principal investigator(s), and the amount, dates and source(s) of financial support. ACTIVE RESEARCH PROJECTS IN PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGYPrinciple Investigator Title Funding Source Years of Funding Total of Grant $1,775,362 Eric Sibley, M.D. Spatiotemporal Regulation of NIH 7/2003 – 6/2008 (Direct Costs: Intestinal Gene Expression $215,000/year) Eric Sibley, M.D. PDX-1 Regulation of National Institute of Diabetes 3/1/2007 – Direct Costs: Intestinal Pattern Formation and Digestive and Kidney 2/28/2012 $250,000/year (Type: R01) Disease (Proposed and Pending)Ricardo Castillo, M.D. Endotexemia in Orthotopic Spectral Diagnostics, Inc. 02/24/2006 – $20,375 Liver Transplantation and 02/23/2007 Small Bowel Transplantation – An Observational Study to
    • Evaluate Levels of Endotoxin Activity ASSAY (EAA) in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Liver Transplant or Small Bowel TransplantRicardo Castillo, M.D. Adenovirus in Pediatric NIH 04/01/2007 – $429,000 Intestinal Transplant 03/31/2009 (Pending) Recipients – A Prospective StudyWilliam Berquist, M.D. Studies in Pediatric Liver NIH and the EMMES 6/2004 – 5/2009 $206,250 Transplantation Corporation John Kerner, M.D. Aluminum Exposure from Innovations in Patient Care 2005 - 2006 $6000 Parenteral Nutrition at LPCH: Grant, Lucile Packard Meeting the New FDA Foundation Regulation John Kerner, M.D. An Integrated Web-Based NIH Grant: 1K07HL04325-01 09/28/2000 – $800,000 over 5 Nutrition Curriculum Nutrition Academic Award 08/31/2005 years (extended Extended to a 6th to a 6th year) year – ending 08/31/2006
    • 19 7. Provide a list of scholarly publications and presentations at regional, national and international meetings by faculty and residents within the program for the last five years only. Do not duplicate citations. Underline the names of subspecialty residents. List journal articles, presentations and abstracts separately under those headings.D7. SCHOLARLY PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS AT REGIONAL, NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL MEETINGS BY FACULTY AND RESIDENTS WITHIN THE PEDIATRIC G-I/NUTRITION DIVISION AT STANFORD. (SUBSPECIALTY RESIDENTS’ NAMES ARE UNDERLINED) I. ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPTS1. Durant, M., Gargosky, S., Dahlstrom, K.A., Fang, F., Hellman, B.H., and R. O. Castillo. Role of Growth Hormone in Intestinal Adaptation to Massive Small Bowel Resection. Pediatric Research 49: 189-196, 20012. Fang, R., Olds, L., Santiago, N.A. and Sibley, E. GATA-Family transcription factors activate the lactase gene promoter in intestinal epithelial cells. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 2001; 280:G58-67.3. Meng, S., Badrinarain, J., Sibley, E., Fang, R., and Hodin, R.A. Thyroid hormone and the D-type cyclins interact in regulating enterocyte gene transcription. J Gastrointest Surg 2001; 5:49-55.4. Pratt CA, Garcia MG, Kerner JA Jr: Nutritional management of neonatal and infant liver disease. Neo Reviews 2:e215-222, 2001.5. Pratt CA, Garcia MG, Poole RL, Kerner JA Jr: Life-long TPN vs. intestinal transplantation in children with microvillus inclusion disease. Journal of Pediatric Pharmacology and Therapeutics 6:498-503, 2001.6. Lee, S.Y., Wang, Z., Lin, C.K., Contag, C.H., Olds, L.C., Cooper, A.D. and Sibley, E. Regulation of intestine-specific spatiotemporal expression by the rat lactase promoter. J Biol Chem 2002; 277:13099-105.7. Bass DM, Prevo M, Waxman DS "Gastrointestinal safety of an extended-release, nondeformable, oral dosage form (OROS: a retrospective study." Drug Saf 2002; 25: 14: 1021-1033:8. Castillo, R.O., Davies, Y.K., Lin, Y-C, Garcia, M., and H. Young. Management of Esophageal Strictures in Children with Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 34:535-541, 20029. Deitcher SR, Fesen MR, Kiproff PM, Hill PA, Xin Li, McCluskey ER, Semba CP for the Cardiovascular Thrombolytic to Open Occluded Lines – 2 Investigators (including: Kerner JA Jr): The safety and efficacy of Alteplase for restoring function in occluded central venous catheters: results of the Cardiovascular Thrombolytic to Open Occluded Lines trial. Journal of Clinical Oncology 20:317-324, 2002.10. Falco DA, Nepomuceno RR, Krams SM, Lee PP, Davis MM, Salvatierra O, Alexander SR, Esquivel CO, Cox KL, Frankel LR, Martinez OM. Identification of Epstein-Barr virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes in the circulation of pediatric transplant recipients. Transplantation 74, 501-510, No. 4, August 27, 2002.11. Lee, S.Y., Madan, A., Furuta, G.T., Colgan, S.P. and Sibley, E. Lactase gene transcription is activated in response to hypoxia in intestinal epithelial cells. Mol Genet Metab 2002; 75:65-9.12. Rodriguez-Baez N, O’Brien R, Qiu S-Q, and Bass DM. Astrovirus, adenovirus, and rotavirus in hospitalized children: Prevalence and association with gastroenteritis. . J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2002 Jul;35(1):64-8.13. Semba CP, Deitcher SR, Li X, Resnansky L, Tu T, McCluskey ER for the COOL Investigators (including Kerner JA Jr): Treatment of occluded central venous catheters with alteplase: results in 1,064 patients. J Vasc Interv Radiol 13:1199-1205, 2002.14. Sibley, E., Milliken, J., Anand, S. and Doroshow, R. Subarachnoid hemorrhage and isolated atresia of the aortic arch. J Emerg Med 2002; 22:179-83.15. Zajicek A, Esquivel C, Millan M, Cox K, Berquist R, and Berquist W. Thirteen Years’ Experience in Pediatric Liver Transplantation: Differences Between Tacrolimus and Cyclosporine. Transplantation Proceedings Vol 34, No. 5:1976-78, August 2002.16. Davies Y, Kerner JA: Making a Broadway production out of fever and abdominal pain. Contemporary Pediatrics, 2003 20:21-24. ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPTS (Continued)17. Longhurst C, Naumovski L, Garcia-Careaga M, Kerner J: A practical guideline for calculating parenteral nutrition cycles, Nutrition in Clinical Practice 18:517-520, December 2003.18. Millan MT, Berquist WE, So SK, Sarwal MM, Wayman KI, Cox KL, Filler G, Salvatierra O Jr, Esquivel CO. One hundred percent patient and kidney allograft survival with simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation in infants with primary hyperoxaluria: a single-center experience. Transplantation. 76(10):1458-63; Nov 27, 2003.19. Olds, L.C. and Sibley, E. Lactase persistence DNA variant enhances lactase promoter activity in vitro: functional role as a cis regulatory element. Hum Mol Genet 2003; 12:2333-40.
    • 20. Shen V, Li X, Murdock M, Resnansky L, McCluskey ER, Semba CP for the Cool Investigators (including Kerner JA Jr.): Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (alteplase) for restoration of function to occluded central venous catheters in pediatric patients. Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology 25 (1):38-45, 2003.21. Fisher AA, Deffenbaugh C, Poole RL, Garcia M, Kerner A. Jr.: The use of alteplase for restoring patency to occluded central venous access devices in infants and children. Journal of Infusion Nursing 27(3):171-174, 2004 (May/June issue).22. Bass DM, Cordoba E, Dekker C, Schuind A, and C Cassady. Intestinal imaging of children with acute gastroenteritis. J Ped GI Nutr 39:270-274, 2004.23. Chao, CK and Sibley, E. PCR-RFLP genotyping assay for a lactase persistence polymorphism in the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene. Genet Test 2004; 8:190-3.24. DiDomenico P, Berry G, Bass D, Fridge J, Sarwal M "Noncirrhotic portal hypertension in association with juvenile nephropathic cystinosis: case presentation and review of the literature." J Inherit Metab Dis 2004; 27: 5: 693-9.25. Hurwitz M, Desai DM, Cox KL, Berquist WE, Esquivel CO, Millan MT. Complete immunosuppressive withdrawal as a uniform approach to post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric liver transplantation. Pediatr Transplantation 8:267-72; 2004.26. Hurwitz M, Garcia MG, Poole RL, Kerner JA: Copper deficiency during parenteral nutrition: a report of four pediatric cases. Nutrition in Clinical Practice 19:305-308, 2004 (June issue).27. Jaimes MC, Rojas OL, Kunkel EJ, Butcher EC, Bass DM, Angel J, Franco MA, and Greenberg HB. Maturation and trafficking markers on rotavirus-specific B cells circulating during acute infection and convalescence in children. J Virol, 78:10967-10976, 2004.28. Nguyen PC, Garcia-Careaga M, Bass D "Gastrointestinal bleeding." Clin Pediatr (Phila) 2005; 44: 7: 641-643.29. Sibley, E. Carbohydrate intolerance. Curr Opin Gastroenterol 2004; 20:162-7.30. Sibley, E. Genetic variation and lactose intolerance: detection methods and clinical implications. Am J Pharmacogenomics 2004; 4:239-45.31. Wang, Z., Fang, R., Olds, L.C. and Sibley, E. Transcriptional regulation of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase promoter by PDX-1. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 2004; 287:G555-61.32. Garcia-Careaga M, Kerner JA Jr.: Gastrointestinal manifestations of food allergies in pediatric patients. Nutrition in Clinical Practice 20:526-535, 2005 (October).33. Davies YK, Cox KM, Abdullah BA, Terry AB, Cox KL. Oral Vancomycin: Treatment of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis in Children. JPGN, 2005; 37:345-346.34. George TI, Jeng M, Berquist W, Cherry AM, Link MP, Arber DA. Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma arising after Liver Transplantation: Case Report and Review of the Literature. Pediatric Blood and Cancer 44(3):270-6, 2005.35. Tang, S., Sambanis, A. and Sibley, E. Proteasome modulating agents induce rAAV2-mediated transgene expression in human intestinal epithelial cells. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2005; 331:1392-400.36. Mian S, Baron H. Adalimumab, a novel anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha antibody in a child with refractory Crohns disease. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2005 Sep;41(3):357-9.37. Riley MR, Bass NM, Rosenthal P, Merriman RB. Underdiagnosis of pediatric obesity and underscreening for fatty liver disease and metabolic syndrome by pediatricians and pediatric subspecialists. J Pediatr. 2005 Dec;147(6):839-42. ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPTS (Continued)38. Castillo RO, Zarge R, Cox K, Strichartz D, Berquist W, Bonham CA, Esquivel CO. Pediatric Intestinal Transplantation at Packard Children’s Hospital/Stanford University Medical Center: Report of a Four Year Experience. Transplantation Proc 38:1716-17, 2006.39. Kerner JA Jr, Poole RL: The use of intravenous fat in neonates. Nutrition in Clinical Practice. 21:374-380, 2006 (August).40. Riley MR, Burtelow M., Garcia, M, Cox K, Berquist W, Kerner J Jr: Unusual Presentation of Hepatic Infantile Hemangioendothelioma. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 42:109-113, 2006 (January).41. Wang, Z., Maravelias, C. and Sibley, E. Lactase gene promoter fragments mediate differential spatial and temporal expression patterns in transgenic mice. DNA Cell Biol. 2006; 25:215-22.42. Wu PA, Kerner JA, Berquist WE. Parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis related to parental care. Nutrition in Clinical Practice 21:291-295, 2006 (June).43. Berquist RK, Berquist WE, Esquivel CO, Cox KL, Wayman KI, Litt IF. Adolescent Non-Adherence: Prevalence and Consequences in Liver Transplant Recipients. Pediatr Transplant 10(3):304-10, 2006.44. Fang, R., Olds, L.C. and Sibley, E. Spatiotemporal patterns of intestine-specific transcription factor expression during postnatal mouse gut development. Gene Expr Patterns. 2006; 6:426-32.
    • 45. Kerner JA Jr., Garcia-Careaga M, Fisher AA, Poole RL: Treatment of catheter occlusion in pediatric patients. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition: 30:573-581, 2006 (January-February).46. Sharek PJ, Wayman K, Lin E, Strichartz D, Sentivany-Collins S, Good J, Esquivel C, Brown M, Cox K. Improved pain management in pediatric postoperative liver transplant patients using parental education and non-pharmacologic interventions. Pediatr Transplantation 2006: 10:172-77.47. Blaney M, Shen V, Kerner J, et al.: Alteplase for the treatment of central venous catheter occlusion in children: results of a prospective, open-label, single arm study (CAPS Trial). Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (JVIR)—in press. I. BOOK CHAPTERS/REVIEW/EDITORIALS1. Bass DM “Group A rotavirus” In: Infections of the Gastrointestinal Tract. M. Blaser and P. Smith (eds), Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia, 2001. 859-878.2. Bass DM “Infectious Diarrhea in children: working group report of the first World congress of Pediatric Gastroenterology.” J Ped Gastroent and Nutr. 35:s143-150, 2002.3. Bass DM “Rotavirus” In: Antimicrobial Therapy and Vaccines. V. Yu (ed) Apple Trees Productions, New York (2002) 1405- 1413.4. Bass DM “Treatment of viral gastroenteritis” In: Viral Gastroenteritis. U Desselberger and J gray (eds). Elsevier Science B.V. 2002 93-104.5. Bass DM and Greenberg HB “ Calicivirus” In: Antimicrobial Therapy and Vaccines. V. Yu (ed) Apple trees Productions, New York (2002)1143-11456. Bass DM and Greenberg HB “Astrovirus” In: Antimicrobial Therapy and Vaccines. V. Yu (ed) Apple trees Productions, New York (2002) 1141-11437. Bass DM and Greenberg HB “Enteric Adenovirus” In: Antimicrobial Therapy and Vaccines. V. Yu (ed) Apple trees Productions, New York (2002) 1139-1141.8. Nishioka FY, Poole RL, Kerner JA Jr: Selecting a home infusion company, in Guidelines for Pediatric Home Health Care (ed. McConnell MS) American Academy of Pediatrics, Elk Grove Village, IL, pgs. 97-103, 2002.9. Kerner JA: Nutritional support of the asphyxiated infant, in Sunshine P, Stevenson DK, Benitz W (eds.) Fetal and Neonatal Brain Injury, 3rd edition, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K, pgs. 791-814, 2003.10. Garcia-Careaga M, Kerner JA Jr: Malabsorption, in Behrman RE (Ed), Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 17th edition, pgs. 1257- 1272, 2003. BOOK CHAPTERS/REVIEW/EDITORIALS (continued)11. Hurwitz M, Berquist WE. Outras Alteracoes Pancreaticas. Gastroenterologia e Hepatologia em Pediatria, 2003. Chapter 25:329- 331.12. Kerner JA Jr: Parenteral nutrition. In Walker WA, Watkins JB, Duggan C (eds). Nutrition in Pediatrics, Third Edition, B.C. Decker, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, pgs. 957-985, 2003.13. Kerner JA, Hattner JAT: Undernutrition and refeeding syndrome in children. In Hark L and Morrison G (eds). Medical Nutrition and Disease. 3rd ed. Blackwell Publishing, Malden, Massachusetts, pgs. 160-166, 2003.14. Sibley, E. Carbohydrate digestion and absorption. In: Encyclopedia of Gastroenterology, Leonard R. Johnson, editor. Academic Press: San Diego, CA. pp 275-8. 2003.15. Bass DM “Rotavirus and other agents of viral gastroenteritis” In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 17th ed Behrman, Kliegman, and Arvin (eds), W.B. Saunders, Philadelphia. (2004) 1081-1084.16. Bass DM “Viral gastroenteritis: In: Pediatric Gastrointestinal Disease. W. Allan Walker etal. (eds). B.C. Decker Hamilton Ontario , (2004)17. Bass DM Case definition of intussception: use and misuse. Editorial JPGN (In Progress 2004)18. Cox KL. Liver Transplantation. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 17th edition, 2004. Chapter 349, p. 1349-1350.19. Fridge J and Bass DM “Parasites” In: Pediatric Gastrointestinal Disease. R. Wyllie and JS Hyam (eds). W. B. Saunders, Philadelphia (In Press 2004)20. Kerner JA Jr: Parenteral Nutrition, in the 5th edition of the American Academy of Pediatrics Pediatric Nutrition Handbook. Ronald E. Kleinman (ed.), Chapter 22, p. 369-389, 2004.21. Riley M and Bass DM “Infectious Diarrhea” In: Pediatric Gastroenterology: The Requisites. C Liacouris (ed) WB Saunders (In press 2005)22. Bass DM “Astroviruses” In: The mucosal Immune System. S Tyring (ed). (In press 2005)
    • 23. Garcia-Careaga M, Castillo RO, Kerner JA Jr: Intestinal Transplantation, in Goldworth A, Frankel L (Eds.) Ethics in Pediatrics, Cambridge University Press, p. 190-195, 2005.24. Garcia-Careaga M, Kerner JA Jr: Munchausen Syndrome By Proxy, in Goldworth A, Frankel L (Eds.), Ethics in Pediatrics, Cambridge University Press, p. 55-66, 2005.25. Hurwitz M, Cox KL. Liver Transplantation. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 18th ed., 2005. Chapter 349.26. Wong, R.J., DeSandre, G.H., Sibley, E., Stevenson, D.K. Neonatal jaundice and liver disease. Chapter 46. In: Neonatal- Perinatal Medicine, Fanaroff AA, Martin RJ, Walsh M editors, 8th Edition. Mosby, Elsevier Science: Philadelphia, PA. pp 1419-65. 200527. Hurwitz M, Kerner JA. Parenteral Nutrition. Nutrition in Pediatrics, 4th ed., Chapter 69. (in press)28. Kerner JA Jr: Nishioka FY, Poole RL: Selecting a Home Infusion Program or Company. In Imaizumi SO (ed): Guidelines for Pediatric Home Care, 2nd edition; American Academy of Pediatrics (in press).29. Nguyen PC, Kerner JA Jr: Gastrointestinal allergy, in Hoekelman’s Primary Pediatric Care, 5th edition. American Academy of Pediatrics (in press).30. Nguyen PC, Kerner JA Jr: Home Parenteral Nutrition Support in Pediatrics, In Ireton-Jones CS, DeLegge M (eds.) Handbook of Home Nutrition Support, Jones and Bartlett Publishers (in press).31. Safta A, Kerner JA Jr: Gluten-sensitive enteropathy, in Hoekelman’s Primary Pediatric Care, 5th edition. American Academy of Pediatrics (in press).32. Sibley, E. Monosaccharide malabsorption. In: Encyclopedic Reference of Molecular Mechanisms of Disease, Florian Lang, editor. Springer: Berlin, Germany. In Press.33. Sibley, E. Sucrose intolerance. In: Encyclopedic Reference of Molecular Mechanisms of Disease, Florian Lang, editor. Springer: Berlin, Germany. In Press.34. Sibley, E. Carbohydrate Assimilation. In: Textbook of Gastroenterology. Tadataka Yamada, David H. Alpers, Loren Laine, Neil Kaplowitz, Chung Owyang and Don W. Powell editors, 5th Edition. Submitted. ABSTRACTS PRESENTED AT RESEARCH MEETING1. Zajicek A, Cox K, Castillo R, Millan M, Esquivel C, Berquist WE. Chronic rejection in pediatric post-liver transplant patients: acute rejection predisposition. Poster presented at the Second International Congress on Immunosuppression, San Diego, CA, December, 2001.2. Bass DM and Qiu S-Q. Astrovirus proteolytic processing by cellular proteases. American Society for Virology annual meeting . Lexington Ky. July 13, 2001.3. Bass DM, Cordoba E, Dekker C, and Cassady, C. Intestinal imaging of children with acute rotavirus gastroenteritis. Presented at workshop on intussusception, rotavirus and oral vaccines. Arlington, VA September 5-7, 2001.4. Bass DM, Rodriguez N. Viral enteritis prevalence in children’s hospital. American Society for Virology annual meeting. Madison, WI July 13, 2001.5. Desai DM, Millan MT, O’Hali WA, Zajicek A, Monge HL, Cox KL, Castillo R, Berquist WE, Esquivel CO. Influence of race on outcomes in pediatric liver transplantation. American Journal of Transplantation Supplement 3, 2:295; 2002.6. Desai DM, Millan MT, O’Hali WA, Zajicek A, Monge HL, Cox KL, Castillo R, Berquist WE, Esquivel CO. Influence of race on outcomes in pediatric liver transplantation. Presented, American Transplant Congress, April 26-May 1, 2002, Washington, DC.7. Fisher AA, Deffenbaugh CA, Poole RL, Garcia M, Kerner JA: Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (Alteplase) for restoring patency to occluded central venous access devices in infants and children. Presented as a poster at the INS (Infusion Nurses Society) meeting, Phoenix, AZ, May 7, 2002.8. Schultz LM, Berquist W, SheehanMG. Calorie Requirement at Ketogenic Diet Initiation. Presented at Annual Meeting of American Epilepsy Society, Seattle, WA., December 6-11, 2002.9. Wayman KI, Esquivel CO, Cox KL. A comparison of the developmental outcome of children with biliary atresia transplanted birth to 7 months of age with children transplanted 8 to 15 months of age. Presented, NASPGHAN Annual Meeting, San Antonio, TX, October 2002.10. Hurwitz M, Garcia MG, Kerner JA Jr: Copper deficiency during TPN: a report of four cases. Nutrition Week 2003 Program Booklet, p. 106 (presented as a poster at Nutrition Week, San Antonio, Texas, 2003), and Nutrition in Clinical Practice 18(2):185, 2003.11. Berquist R, Wayman KI, Cox KL, Esquivel CO. Increased rejection episodes in non-compliant adolescents after liver transplantation. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:124; 2003.12. Berquist RK, Wayman KI, Cox KL, Esquivel CO, Berquist WE. Increased rejection episodes in non-compliant adolescents after liver transplantation. Pediatric Transplantation Supplement. Supplement 4:124, April 2003.
    • 13. Berquist WE, Zajicek A, Berquist R, Cox K, Millan M, Esquivel CO. Experience in pediatric liver transplantation over thirteen years: differences between tacrolimus and cyclosporine. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:73; 2003.14. Cox KL, Wayman KI, Berquist WE, Castillo RO, Esquivel CO. A descriptive analysis of a pediatric liver transplant outreach model of patient care at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:111, 2003.15. Davies YK, Cox KL, Abdullah BA, Terry AB, Cox KL. Oral Vancomycin: Treatment of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis in Children. JPGN:37:345-346, 2003.16. Fridge J and Bass DM Neonatal miliary tuberculosis presenting as malignant ascites. NASPGHAN. Nov 17, 2003; Toronto Canada17. Hurwitz M, Desai DM, Cox KL, Esquivel CO, Millan MT. Complete Immunosuppressive Drug Withdrawal as a Uniform Approach to Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disease in Pediatric Liver Transplantation, poster. Second Congress of the International Pediatric Transplant Association, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. April 2003.18. Hurwitz M, Desai DM, Cox KL, Esquivel CO, Millan MT. Complete immunosuppressive drug withdrawal as a uniform approach to post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric liver transplantation. American Journal of Transplantation Supplement 5, 3:306; 2003.19. Hurwitz M, Desai DM, Cox KL, Esquivel CO, Millan MT. Complete immunosuppressive drug withdrawal as a uniform approach to post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric liver transplantation. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:76; 2003. ABSTRACTS PRESENTED AT RESEARCH MEETING (Continued)20. Hurwitz M, Garcia MG, Kerner JA. Copper Deficiency During TPN: A Report of Four Pediatric Cases, poster. A.S.P.E.N. Nutrition Week, San Antonio, Texas, January 2003.21. Kerner J Jr, Garcia M, Riley M, and Berquist W: Hemangioendothelioma of the liver presenting as fulminant hepatic failure in an infant. Presented as a “clinical vignette” poster, NASPGHAN Annual Meeting, October 2003.22. Millan MT, Berquist WE, So SK, Sarwal MM, Wayman KI, Cox KL, Filler G, Salvatierra O Jr., Esquivel CO. One hundred percent patient and kidney allograft survival with simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation in infants with primary hyperoxaluria: a single-center experience. Transplantation Vol 76:1458-1463, No. 10, Nov. 27, 2003.23. Rebecca Berquist, BS, Karen I. Wayman, PhD, Kenneth L Cox, MD, Carlos O. Esquivel, MD and William Berquist, MD . Increased rejection episodes in non-compliant adolescents after liver transplantation. Presented at the 2nd Congress of the International Pediatric Transplant Association, Rio de Janeiro, April 5-9, 2003.24. Riley MR, Cox KL, Castillo RO, and Berquist WE. Pediatric End-Stage Liver Disease Score: Incomplete measure of need for liver transplant. JPGN 37:384, 2003. Presented at NASPGHAN, Montreal, October 2003.25. Wayman KI, Esquivel CO, Cox KL. A comparison of IQ scores and school performance of children with biliary atresia 6, 8, and 10 years following extrahepatic liver transplantation. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:110; 2003.26. Wayman KI, Esquivel CO, Cox KL. A comparison of the developmental outcome of children with biliary atresia transplanted birth to 7 months of age with children transplanted 8 to 15 months of age. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:125; 2003.27. Berquist RK, Berquist WE, Esquivel CO, Cox KL, Wayman KL, Litt IF. Prevalence, demographic variables and adverse outcomes associated with n on-adherence to immunosuppressiver therapy in adolescent liver transplant recipients. Presented at Twenty-First Annual Stanford Medical Student Research Symposium. May 6, 2004.28. Berquist RK, Litt I, Cox KL, Esquivel CO, Wayman KI, Berquist WE. Prevalence, demographic variables and adverse outcomes associated with non-adherence to immunosuppressive therapy in adolescent liver transplant recipients. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition. 39 Supplement 1:S145, June 2004.29. Fridge JL, Kerner J, Cox K: The specific carbohydrate diet – a treatment for Crohn’s Disease: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 39, Suppl. 1, p. S299-S300, 2004 (June issue) and presented as a poster at the 2nd World Congress of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Paris, France, July 2004.30. Riley MR, Berquist WE, Bass NM, Merriman RB, Rosenthal P. Failure to diagnose obesity and screen for fatty liver disease in pediatric practice. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition, Supplement 1:S464, June 2004.31. Berquist RK, Berquist WE, Litt I. Severe Adverse Consequences of Non-Adherence in Adolescent Liver Transplant Patients. Poster Presentation, NASPGHAN 2005 Annual Meeting, Salt Lake City, UT. Oct. 21, 2005.32. Castillo RO, Zarge R, Cox KL, Strichartz D, Berquist WE, Hurwitz M, Bonham CA. Esquivel CO. Pediatric intestinal transplantation at Stanford University/Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital (SU/LPCH). Poster presented at IX International Small Bowel Transplantation Symposium, June 30-July 2, 2005, Brussels, Belgium.33. Riley M, Berquist W, Hurwitz M. Complications Following Liver Transplantation for Hepatoblastoma, poster. NASPGHAN Meeting. Salt Lake City, UT. October 2005.34. Riley M, Safta A, Hurwitz M. Ductus Venosus and Right Heart Failure: Liver Dysfunction and Hyperammonemia, poster. NASPGHAN Meeting. Salt Lake City, UT. October 2005.
    • 35. Nguyen C, Hurwitz M. Management of Allergy after Tacrolimus-based Immunosuppression, poster. First International Gastrointestinal Eosinophilic Research Symposium. Orlando, FL. October 2006.36. Poole RL, Hintz SR, Mackenzie NI, Kerner John A Jr: Aluminum exposure in neonates from parenteral nutrition. Pediatric Academic Societies’ 2006 Annual Meeting, April 29, 2006; Program Syllabus, p. 64.37. Beaunoyer M, Vanatta J, Ogihara M, Strichartz D, Cox K, Esquivel CO. The Milan Criteria do not apply to children with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). World Transplant Congress, July 22-27, 2006.38. Berquist RK, Berquist WE, Litt IF. Patient Variables and Adverse Outcomes Associated with Non-Adherence in Adolescent Liver Transplant Patients. Oral presentation at the World Transplant Congress, July 26, 2006, Boston MA. ABSTRACTS PRESENTED AT RESEARCH MEETING (Continued)39. Berquist RK, Berquist WE, Litt IF. Transition from Pediatric to Adult Care in Liver Transplant Recipients. Poster presented at World Transplant Congress, July 27, 2006, Boston MA.40. Nguyen C, Hurwitz M. Management of Allergy after Tacrolimus-based Immunosuppression, poster. NASPGHAN Meeting. Orlando, FL. October 2006.41. Nguyen C, Stenard F, Cox K, Umetsu D, Esquivel C, Martinez O. Circulating regulatory T-cells (CD4+CD25+FOXP3+) inversely correlate with acute rejection and inflammation in pediatric liver transplant patients. World Transplant Congress, July 22-27, 2006.42. Nguyen C, Wong W, Merker J, Berquist W, Fontaine M, Glader B. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Pediatric Liver Transplant Patients on FK506. Poster presented at the World Transplant Congress, July 27, 2006, Boston MA.43. Poole RL, Rey LL, Hintz SR, Mackenzie NI, Kerner JA Jr: Aluminum exposure from parenteral nutrition: meeting the new FDA regulation. Clinical Nutrition Week A.S.P.E.N. National Meeting, Dallas, Texas, February 14, 2006. Program Syllabus, Clinical Nutrition Week, Volume 2, pg. 635.44. Poole RL, Safta AM, Hintz Susan R, Mackenzie Nicol I, Kerner John A. Aluminum Exposure in Neonates from Parenteral Nutrition. Poster presented at Neonatal Nutrition: Assessment, Intervention & Management, October 12-13,2006, Minneapolis, Minnesota.45. Stevenson TN, Enns G, Berquist W, Wayman K, Sarwal M, Esquivel CO, Millan MT. Long-Term Outcome Following Pediatric Lvier Transplantation for Metabolic Disorders. Poster presented at World Transplant Congress, July 26, 2006, Boston, MA.E. SERVICE DUTIES (Program Requirements for Subspecialties of Pediatrics, III) Describe the call schedule including whether it is on-site or from home. Demonstrate how the schedule allows the subspecialty residents a monthly average of one day in seven away from program duties. The on-call schedule is depicted in the table of page 14. The G-I residents do not have any on-site call; they are on night call exclusively from home. At no time in the residency program is the trainee on call more than every fourth weekend, regardless of the number of total residents in the program. Even in a month when the resident is on clinical service, he/she is on 21 days in a 30 day month or 22 days in a 31 day month (off 9 days both ways) and, therefore, is given more than 1 day in 7 away from program duties. When on elective time or on research time, the G-I resident is only on call every 4th weekend. They have one month of paid vacation per year.
    • 20F. LIBRARY FACILITIES (Program Requirements for Subspecialties of Pediatrics, VII) Describe the library facilities and their availability to the residents. How is the library equipped to handle the particular needs of pediatric subspecialists? Are there computerized literature search facilities available? Lane Medical Library was founded in 1906 by the directors of the Cooper Medical College. Services include general reference, in- depth consulting in all aspects of literature research, journal article file management plus many other information access/management needs (e.g., database design), training programs in bibliographic database searching (e.g., Melvyl-Medline), microcomputer/telecommunication based information access support, and training in general library skills. Lane Medical Library’s research collections cover clinical medicine and its specialties, basic sciences, public health and related fields. With over 3,000 journal titles and approximately 300,000 volumes, the collection ranks among the best in the West. The Library is automated and several databases are networked and available 24 hours a day from labs, wards, offices, and homes. Lane-LOIS is the public access catalog. It will tell you if the Library owns the book, journal, or audio-visual title, if it is on order or checked out, and the due date. Some book chapters are also in the database. Melvyl-Medline includes the most recent five years of the MEDLINE database. It is scheduled to be augmented to the full MEDLINE file, 1966 to the present. Melvyl-Medline can be searched by simple menu or powerful command mode. Lane Information Service Consultants offer brief courses and tutorials in search techniques designed to save user’s time in gaining search experience. Staff search analysts will conduct free mediated searches for those in the Stanford community who need access to MEDLINE data not covered by the recent five years, until the database is augmented. For Macintosh users CD-Lane-Medline is available via Appleshare; it also contains the most recent five years of the MEDLINE database. Another service, Medline-CDPlus, is available via SUNet or dial-up. It has the complete MEDLINE database, but at this point is available for only one user at a time. The Library’s trained, experienced search analysts have access to hundreds of other databases. Mediated searches are done on a cost recovery basis. Lane Medical Library is open seven days, 104 hours a week. Information Service consultants are available Monday through Friday, 8 am to 6 pm. Audiovisuals, computer assisted instructions, microcomputer software, and self service workstations are available at the Fleischmann Learning Resource Center and Medical Informatics Training Laboratory (FLRC/MITL) a branch of Lane Library. The Lane Library is in walking distance from the Pediatric Gastroenterology offices and carries a full battery of pediatric subspecialty journals and textbooks.G. EVALUATION (Program Requirements for Subspecialties of Pediatrics, VIII) Do not attach evaluation forms but have them available for inspection by the site visitor. 1. Evaluation of subspecialty residents a. How often and by whom are the residents in this program formally evaluated? Are written records of the evaluations maintained by the program? Trainees are formally evaluated by their attendings using standard evaluation tools. All six of the expected competencies are assessed every three months in the first year and every 6 months in the second and third year. In their research years, the fellows are evaluated additionally at least twice yearly by their research mentor and by their Scholarly Oversight Committee. Written records of these evaluations are maintained in a secure area of the division offices. b. Describe the process, frequency and by whom these evaluations are discussed with the residents. Once the results of the evaluations are compiled and returned in a confidential manner to the trainees, the trainees are invited to discuss their evaluations in a one-on-one meeting with Dr. Kerner. c.Do they have an opportunity to read and respond to their evaluations? Describe the process. All trainees have the opportunity to both read and respond to their evaluations. Discussion of their quarterly and biannual evaluations with Dr. Kerner allows for a more comprehensive assessment of the trainee’s competence. In general, trainees take advantage of and appreciate the opportunity for formal evaluation and feedback. d.Describe the mechanisms for monitoring each residents acquisition of skills in the performance of the procedures utilized in this subspecialty.
    • To monitor each trainee’s acquisition of skills in the performance of G-I procedures, we are using a log book similar to “The Documentation Logbook for Procedures in Gastroenterology” developed by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) in conjunction with the Clinical Privileges Project of the American College of Physicians. The logbook allows the trainee to enter the Name, Medical Record Number, Date, and Type of every procedure done. His G-I Attending who supervises the procedure can fill out right at the time an evaluation of the procedure, commenting on cognitive skill, competency to perform independently, qualified to teach, and other comments. Our current subspecialty residents have been given copies of this logbook. The list of procedures performed is reviewed by the program director on a regular basis. Such a review allows the program director to make sure the G-I residents are receiving a balanced and adequate exposure to G-I procedures. If a deficit is discovered, additional procedures for that G-I resident are arranged.2. Evaluation of faculty a. Describe the mechanism, frequency and by whom faculty are evaluated on their teaching ability, clinical knowledge and scholarly activity. Faculty performance is evaluated by the Department of Pediatrics, using standard forms, based on their teaching ability, clinical knowledge, personal interactions, and scholarly activity. The forms are routinely sent to subspecialty residents, residents, and students. The faculty evaluations are reviewed by the Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics and discussed with the faculty members on a regular basis. The director of the Pediatric Housestaff Training Program routinely sends summaries of faculty evaluations by pediatric residents to individual faculty members and their division chiefs. In addition, with a new computer program called Med-Hub, our subspecialty residents complete annual confidential evaluation of all our pediatric G-I faculty. b. How do the residents in this training program participate formally in the process? On a yearly basis, trainees are asked to evaluate program faculty via the Med-Hub computerized system. These evaluations are completed and returned in a confidential manner to Dr. Kerner. Such evaluations are provided to Dr. Cox (Division Chief) and become a permanent part of each faculty member’s file and are used by Dr. Cox in his annual evaluations of the faculty.3. Evaluation of program by staff and residents? a. Is the training program periodically evaluated by the staff and the residents? The training program is periodically evaluated in both a formal and informal manner by trainees and faculty. b. How often does this evaluation take place and what is the mechanism by which it is accomplished? There is a standard form to evaluate the program which is circulated to and returned from G-I subspecialty residents and G-I faculty on a yearly basis. Additionally, Dr. Kerner is the coordinator of the educational training in gastroenterology for pediatric residents, Stanford medical students, and visiting medical students. Dr. Kerner solicits informal feedback on the program from these residents and students. Additionally, he seeks informal feedback from Dr. Ted Sectish (Director of Pediatric Residency training) and from the directors of the Pediatric Clerkship for medical students. The program director informally requests feedback about the training program from the G-I residents on a regular basis. c.How are these evaluations used in program planning and development?
    • The program in Pediatric Gastroenterology is annually evaluated internally by the division with input from all full-timefaculty, all trainees, nurse-specialists, nutritionists, social workers, and other members of our team. The division hasundergone an External Review (as part of a Pediatric Department-wide review) in 1988 and as part of a department-wide External Review in the fall of 1993. An internal review of our division’s G-I residency program occurred in 1998,2000, 2002, and 2004. All these evaluations, plus the formal annual written evaluations enable us to change theprogram in a constructive manner, to bolster any areas of weakness, and to develop appropriate program planningfor the future of the division.Proposed changes in the training program are brought to the attention of faculty and trainees for discussion andrefinement before implementation. Due to our thorough evaluations of the program, many changes to improve ourprogram have occurred in the past 5 years: 1. establishment of our own Pediatric G-I journal club (in addition to the Adult G-I journal club); 2. establishment of regular Pediatric G-I pathology rounds; 3. establishment of a regular joint Pediatric G-I/Pediatric Surgery Conference where shared cases are discussed and Pediatric Radiology attendings help review appropriate imaging studies of patients discussed; 4. establishment of a regularly scheduled “Difficult Cases” Conference; 5. sending our second year subspecialty residents to two University of California courses on a) Biostatistics and b) Designing Clinical Research to enhance the introduction to research curriculum offered here at Stanford. 6. to further enhance the curriculum in Research, SPCTRM (Stanford/Packard Center for Translational Research in Medicine) has launched an “Intensive Course in Clinical Research: Study Design and Performance” for subspecialty residents. SPCTRM has also developed additional courses for subspecialty residents including valuable courses in Biostatistics and Data Visualization. 7. planning is underway to develop a formal “Board Review” lecture series to enhance our Core Curriculum didactic teaching—we will base these lectures on the format of the NASPGHAN Board Review Course run by our own faculty member (Dr. William Berquist); 8. planning is underway to enhance our Fellows’ exposure to various motility studies (esophageal motility, antroduodenal motility, electrogastrography, and ano-rectal manometry).
    • Appendix A-Program DirectorJOHN ALAN KERNER, JR., M.D.Birth: November 16, 1947 San Francisco, CaliforniaHome address: 3419 Shady Spring Lane Mountain View, California 94040Home phone: (650) 968-1497Marital status: Married 1981 to Louise Poirier, R.N. 1 daughter, Lisa, born 7/30/87Education: 1965-1969 Stanford University - B.A. 1969-1973 University of California at San Francisco - M.D. 1973-1976 Internship and Residency in Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine 1977-1979 Postdoctoral Fellowship in Pediatric Gastroenterology, Stanford University School of MedicineLicensure: 1976 - State of California: #G-028373Research Appointments1970 (summer) Fellowship w/Dr. K.P.M. Heirwegh Laboratory of Liver Pathophysiology, Louvain, Belgium1971 (summer) Fellowship w/Dr. M.M. Thaler, Department of Pediatrics, University of CaliforniaClinical and Faculty Appointments1979 - July Acting Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine1979 - November Director of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Coordinator of Pediatric Nutritional Support Services at Stanford University Hospital1981 - July Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine1981 – July Director, Fellowship in Pediatric Gastroenterology1987 - January Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine1991 - June Chief of Gastroenterology and Nutrition Service, Lucile Salter Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford1992 - September Professor of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine1992 - November Medical Director of Lucile Salter Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford Home Pharmacy1994 - November Director of the Nutrition Support Team at Lucile Salter Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford1995 - January Associate Director, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and NutritionHonors1965 Life Membership, California Scholarship Federation1969 Graduated “With Distinction”, Stanford University1972 - May Dean’s prize in Research, University of California at San Francisco1981 - June Clinical Teaching Award: (Named by Pediatric Housestaff as the Pediatric Faculty Member who contributed most to Housestaff teaching.)1982 - 1983 academic year: William M. Hume Faculty Scholar1983 - 1984 academic year: William M. Hume Faculty Scholar1984 - 1985 academic year: Mellon Foundation Fellow
    • 1984 – September: Winner - 1st Place - Poster Session (judged to have the best poster presentation) at California Perinatal Association annual meeting1987 - June Kaiser Award for Innovative and Outstanding Contributions to Medical Education (awarded at commencement of Stanford Medical School)1990 - January Named “Clinical Investigator of the Year” by Clintec Nutrition Company 1992 - September: Named “One of the Best Doctors in the Bay Area” (selected by peers). San Francisco Focus magazine, September 1992, p. 105.2001 – July My “Publications of the Nutrition Support Team,” documenting 20 plus years of clinical innovations, research, case reports, and chapters in that arena received special commendation by JCAHO (on a site visit) as a “Best Practice” and was taken back to Chicago to be put on display at JCAHO headquarters.2003 – January Joseph St. Geme, Jr. Education Award from the Western Society of Pediatric Research (presented at the Annual WSPR meeting January 30, 2003).2004 – September Excellence in Teaching award, Medical Education, Stanford University Medical Center2005 – January Listed as one of the “Top Bay Area Physicians” San Francisco Magazine; Listed in the “Guide to America’s Top Pediatricians 2004-2005” (Consumer’s Research Council of America)2005-2006 Selected by peers to be included in the Best Doctors in America databaseBoard Certification1. National Board: 1971 - June, Part I 1973 - April, Part II 1974 - March, Part III2. The American Board of Pediatrics: 1976 - May, Part I 1979 - October, Part II3. The American Board of Pediatrics: Sub-Board of Pediatric Gastroenterology: 1990 - November 1997 – recertification 2004 – recertificationSocieties1980 - present The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition1980 - present American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition1984 - present The Western Society for Pediatric Research1984 - present California Perinatal Association1985 - present Fellow, American College of Nutrition1989 - present American Gastroenterological Association1991 - present Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America (Physician Member)Journal Positions1) Associate Editor, Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN), 2006 to present2) Editorial Board, Journal of Pediatric Pharmacology and TherapeuticsPostgraduate Courses1979 - 1986 Co-Director, Nutritional Care of the High-Risk Obstetrical Patient and the High-Risk Infant (3 day course)1989 - present Director, Advances in Perinatal and Pediatric Nutrition (3 day course - every other year)Courses for Medical Students (and non-medical students – Independent Courses)1) Nutrition Principles (Preclinical) Course #215 (elective) -- Course Director; Academic Year 19992) Pediatrics 308A -- Elective in Pediatric Gastroenterology -- Course Director; 1981 – present
    • 3) Pediatrics 207 -- Nutrition Principles -- Course Director, Winter 2001-present. (All medical students entering 2000-01 or later must enroll in the course Winter Quarter of their first year and must complete all units before entering Med 208B/C (PCM B/C). The course is accessed through the Curriculum Web Project (CWP) site; 1 unit).4) Pediatrics 209 – Clinical Nutrition – Course Director, Spring 2002 – present; (1 unit required course; must be completed prior to graduation). Web-based like Pediatrics 207; medical students must register for the course in Summer Quarter or Autumn Quarter of the year they begin their clinical clerkships and must sign off on all units prior to graduation. Continues the nutrition principles begun in the preclinical course.5) Inde 217 for non-medical students taking Pediatrics 2076) Inde 218 for non-medical students taking Pediatrics 2097) Associate Director, Practice of Medicine course, Fall 2003 – present (includes Peds 207 and Peds 209, which are now a vertical “thread” in this 2-year course).Journal ReviewerAmerican Journal of Diseases of ChildhoodPediatricsJournal of PediatricsJournal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and NutritionGastroenterologyJournal of PerinatologyClinical PediatricsJournal of Adolescent HealthAmerican Journal of Clinical NutritionNuclear MedicineMedical Advisory BoardMicrosoft’s “Pregnancy and Child Care” (edited “Vitamin and Mineral Supplements” and “Vegetarianism”) Nutrition in Medicine (2004-present)COMMITTEESStanford Hospital1979 - 1991 TPN Committee1979 - 1991 Nutrition Committee1983 - 1991 Enteral Nutrition Task Force Chairman1997 - present Parenteral Nutrition and Nutrition CommitteeChildren’s Hospital at Stanford1985 - 1991 Nutrition/TPN Committee Chairman Ambulatory Task Force for Packard Children’s Hospital Committee to decide the future of the new Roth Unit at Packard Children’s Hospital Committee responsible for the Medical Symposium for the opening of Packard Children’s Hospital Operations Excellence Task Force Co-Chairman, Home Health Care Task Force Task Force for the “new” Infant/Toddler and School Age units at Packard Children’s HospitalDepartment of Pediatrics1983 - 1991 Housestaff Advisory Committee Faculty Practice Program Advisory Committee Hematology/Oncology Search Committee Endocrinology Search Committee Gastroenterology Search Committee x 3 Gastroenterology Search Committee Chairman x 21993 - present Housestaff Advisor1994 - present Department of Pediatrics Working Group on Education2000 - 2004 Pulmonary Division Search Committee2002 - present Resident Education Advisory Committee2003 – present Pediatric Residency Program Education Committee
    • Lucile Salter Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford1991 - present Chairman, TPN/Nutrition Committee1991 - 1993 Co-Chair, Home Health Care Advisory Committee1991 - 1992 Co-Chair, TPN/Nutrition Support Services Task Force1991 - 1994 Medical Board1991 - 1993 Liver Transplantation Task Force1993 - present Chairman, Home Health Care Committee1991 - present Ambulatory Care Committee1994 - present Complex Patient Care Task ForceStanford University Medical School2002 – present Clinical Science Advisory Group BIBLIOGRAPHYPEER REVIEWED ARTICLES (63)1. Kerner J, Mitchell J, and Maibach H: Irritant contact dermatitis from Agave Americana L. Arch Dermatol 108:102, 1973.2. Kerner J, Harvey B, and Lewiston N: The impact of grief: A retrospective study of family function following loss of a child with cystic fibrosis. J Chron Dis 32:221, 1979.3. Kerner JA Jr., and Sunshine P: Parenteral alimentation. Seminars in Perinatology 3:417, 1979.4. Berde C, Kerner J, and Johnson J: Use of conjugated polyene fatty acid, parinaric acid, in assaying fatty acids in serum or plasma. Clin Chem 26:1173, 1980.5. Stevenson DK, Kerner JA, Malachowski N, and Sunshine P: Late morbidity among survivors of necrotizing enterocolitis. Pediatrics 66:925, 1980.6. Landon C, Kerner JA, Castillo R, Adams L, Whalen R, and Lewiston NJ: Oral correction of essential fatty acid deficiency in cystic fibrosis. J Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 5:501, 1981.7. Kerner JA Jr, Cassani C, Hurwitz R, and Berde CB: Monitoring intravenous fat emulsions in neonates with the fatty acid/serum albumin molar ratio. J Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 5:517, 1981.8. Kerner JA, Stevenson DK, Hattner JA, Cohen RS, Schwartz HC, and Sunshine P: Evidence for the possible relationship of neonatal skinfold thickness to maternal glucose metabolism during the third trimester. J Pediatr Gastroenterol and Nutr 1:59, 1982.9. Ostrander CR, Stevenson DK, Neu J, Kerner JA, and Moses SW: A sensitive analytical apparatus for measuring hydrogen production rates. I. Application to studies in small animals. Evidence of the effects of a glucosidehydrolast inhibitor in the rat. Analytical Biochem 119:378, 1982.10. Stevenson DK, Cohen RS, Ostrander CR, Shahin SM, Kerner JA, Wetmore DL, Tomczyk M, and Johnson JD: A sensitive analytical apparatus for measuring hydrogen production rates. II. Application to studies in human infants. J Pediatr Gastroenterol and Nutr 1:233, 1982.11. Stevenson DK, Hopper AO, Cohen RS, Bucalo LR, Kerner JA, and Sunshine P: Macrosomia: causes and consequences. J Pediatr 100:515, 1982.12. Stevenson DK, Shahin SM, Ostrander CR, Kerner JA, Cohen RS, Hopper AO, and Yeager AS: Breath hydrogen in preterm infants: Correlation with changes in bacterial colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. J Pediatr 101:6070, 1982.13. D’Harlingue A, Hopper AO, Stevenson DK, Shanin SM, Kerner JA Jr: The limited value of nephelometry in monitoring the administration of intravenous fat in neonates. J Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 7:55, 1983.14. Poole RL, Rupp CA, Kerner JA Jr: Calcium and phosphorus in neonatal parenteral nutrition solutions. J Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 7:358, 1983.
    • 15. Ostrander CR, Stevenson DK, Cohen RS, Hopper AO, Kerner JA Jr, and Johnson JD: Breath hydrogen analysis: A review of the methodologies and clinical applications. J Pediatr Gastroenterol and Nutr 2:525, 1983.16. Poole RL, Kerner JA Jr: Establishing a nutrition support team for an intensive care nursery. Nutritional Support Services 3(2):35, 1983.17. Berde CB, Rasmussen LF, Benitz WE, Kerner JA, Johnson JD, and Wennberg RP: Bilirubin binding in the plasma of newborns: critical evaluation of fluorescence quenching method and comparison with the peroxidase method. Pediatr Res 18:349, 1984.18. Quan R, Kerner J Jr: Complications of intravenous fat use in preterm infants. J Perinatol 4:43, 1984.19. Kerner JA Jr, Hartman G, Sunshine P. The medical and surgical management of infants with the short bowel syndrome. J Perinatol 5:13, 1985.20. Stevenson DK, Yang C, Kerner JA Jr, and Yeager AS: Intestinal flora in the second week of life in hospitalized preterm infants fed exclusively stored frozen breast milk or a proprietary formula. Clin Pediatr 24:338, 1985.21. Tsuboi KK, Kwong LK, D’Harlingue AE, Kerner JA Jr, Stevenson DK, and Sunshine P: The nature of maturational decline of intestinal lactase activity. Biochim Biophys Acta 840:69, 1985.22. Quart KA, Poole RL, MacKenzie N, Stevenson DK, and Kerner JA Jr: The impact of computer-assisted parenteral nutrition for neonates. Nutritional Support Services 5:30, 1985.23. Stevenson DK, Smith D, Kerner JA Jr: Vitamin E and jaundice in premature infants. J Perinatol 5(4):2, 1985.24. Smith D, Isakson G, Frankel L, and Kerner J: Acetaminophen toxicity following multiple dose ingestion in a young child. J Pediatr Gastroenterol and Nutr 5(5):822-825, 1986.25. Wenner WJ Jr, Kerner JA Jr: The addition of amino acids to the peritoneal dialysate in acute renal failure. J Perinatol 6(4):342, 1986.26. Kerner JA Jr, Poole RL, Sunshine P, and Stevenson DK: High serum vitamin E levels in premature infants receiving MVIR Pediatric. J Pediatr and Perinat Nutr 1(1):75, 1987.27. Davis JJ, Heyman MB, Ferrell L, Kerner J, Kerlin R, Thaler MM: Sclerosing cholangitis associated with chronic cryptosporidiosis in a child with a congenital immunodeficiency disorder. Am J Gastroenterol 82(11):1196, 1987.28. Stevenson DK, Castillo RO, Kerner JA Jr: The prospect for neonatal application for non-invasive and nondestructive technologies: Trace gas analysis and magnetic resonance. Perinatology-Neonatology 11(6):9, 1987.29. Kerner JA Jr: Parenteral nutrition in the premature infant: I: Indication, routes of administration, energy needs. Perinatology- Neonatology 12(1):18, 1988.30. Kerner JA Jr: Parenteral nutrition in the premature infant. II: New information on specific nutrient requirements. Perinatology- Neonatology 12(3):8, 1988.31. Mendoza FS, Johnson F, Kerner JA, Tune BM, Shochat SJ: Chronic vitamin A intoxication presenting with ascites and a normal vitamin A level. West J Med 148:88, 1988.32. Modler S, Vreman HJ, Kerner JA Jr., Castillo RO, Stevenson DK: Relationship between breath and total hydrogen excretion in neonates. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 7(4):544, 1988.33. Kerner JA Jr, Hattner JA, Trautman MS, Stevenson DK: Postnatal somatic growth in very low birth weight infants on parenteral nutrition. J Pediatr & Perinat Nutr 2(1):27, 1988.34. Castillo RO, Feng JJ, Stevenson DK, Kerner JA, Kwong LK: Regulation of intestinal ontogeny by intraluminal nutrients. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 10:199, 1990.35. Stevenson DK, Hamori CJ, Carlton RR, Castillo RO, Kerner JA Jr, Vreman HJ: Carbon monoxide production by nonbacterial sources after heme feeding of neonatal rats. Biol Neonate 57:238, 1990.
    • 36. Gonzalez-Heydrich J, Kerner JA Jr, Steiner H: Testing the psychogenic vomiting diagnosis: four pediatric cases. Am J Dis Child 145:913, 1991.37. Stevenson DK, Ochikubo C, Rodgers PA, Kerner JA Jr: Anthropometry and bilirubin production. J Perinatol 11:340, 1991.38. Bell SW, Kerner JA Jr, Sibley R: Microvillus inclusion disease: the importance of electron microscopy for diagnosis. American Journal of Surgical Pathology 15(12):1157-1164, 1991.39. Quan R, Yang C, Rubinstein S, Lewiston N, Sunshine P, Stevenson DK, Kerner JA Jr: Effects of microwaving on anti-infective factors in human milk. Pediatrics 89(4):667, 1992.40. Polk DB, Hattner JAT, Kerner JA Jr: Improved growth and disease activity after intermittent administration of a defined formula diet in children with Crohn’s disease. J Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 16:499-504, 1992.41. Quan R, Yang CC, Stevenson DK, Kerner J: The effect of additives on the anti-infective properties of human milk. Clin Pediatr 33:325-328, 1994.42. Blankenberg F, Parker B, Sibley E, Kerner J: Evolving asymmetric hypertrophic pyloric stenosis associated with histologic evidence of eosinophilic gastroenteritis. Pediatr Radiol 25:310-311, 1995.43. Collins JJ, Kerner J, Sentivany S, Berde CB: Intravenous amitryptyline in pediatrics. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management 10:471-475, 1995.44. Kerner JA Jr: Formula allergy and intolerance, Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, 24:1-25, 1995 (March).45. Fisher AA, Poole RL, Machie R, Tsang C, Baugh N, Utley K, Kerner JA Jr: Clinical pathway for pediatric parenteral nutrition. Nutrition in Clinical Practice 12:76-80, 1997.46. Kerner JA Jr: The use of infant formula in preventing or postponing atopic manifestations. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr, 24:442- 446, 1997.47. Garcia MG, Poole RL, Rubin GD, Kerner JA Jr.: Successful use of repeated ethanol injections to clear a central venous catheter occlusion after urokinase failure. J Pediatr Pharm Practice 4:152-156, 1999.48. Porcelli P, Schanler R, Greer F, Chan G, Gross S, Mehta N, Spear M, Kerner J, Flores L, Terry D, Minervini G, Euler A: Growth in human-milk-fed very low birth weight infants receiving a new human milk fortifier. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism 44:2-10, 2000.49. Garcia-Careaga M, Kerner JA Jr: A gastroenterologists approach to failure to thrive. Pediatric Annals 29:558-567, 2000.50. Pratt CA, Garcia MG, Poole RL, Kerner JA Jr: Life-long TPN vs. intestinal transplantation in children with microvillus inclusion disease. Journal of Pediatric Pharmacology and Therapeutics 6:498-503, 2001.51. Pratt CA, Garcia MG, Kerner JA Jr: Nutritional management of neonatal and infant liver disease. Neo Reviews 2:e215-222, 2001.52. Deitcher SR, Fesen MR, Kiproff PM, Hill PA, Xin Li, McCluskey ER, Semba CP for the Cardiovascular Thrombolytic to Open Occluded Lines – 2 Investigators (including: Kerner JA Jr): The safety and efficacy of Alteplase for restoring function in occluded central venous catheters: results of the Cardiovascular Thrombolytic to Open Occluded Lines trial. Journal of Clinical Oncology 20:317-324, 2002.53. Semba CP, Deitcher SR, Li X, Resnansky L, Tu T, McCluskey ER for the COOL Investigators (including Kerner JA Jr): Treatment of occluded central venous catheters with alteplase: results in 1,064 patients. J Vasc Interv Radiol 13:1199-1205, 2002.54. Longhurst C, Naumovski L, Garcia-Careaga M, Kerner J: A practical guideline for calculating parenteral nutrition cycles, Nutrition in Clinical Practice 18:517-520, December 2003.55. Shen V, Li X, Murdock M, Resnansky L, McCluskey ER, Semba CP for the Cool Investigators (including Kerner JA Jr.): Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (alteplase) for restoration of function to occluded central venous catheters in pediatric patients. Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology 25 (1):38-45, 2003.
    • 56. Fisher AA, Deffenbaugh C, Poole RL, Garcia M, Kerner A. Jr.: The use of alteplase for restoring patency to occluded central venous access devices in infants and children. Journal of Infusion Nursing 27(3):171-174, 2004 (May/June issue).57. Hurwitz M, Garcia MG, Poole RL, Kerner JA: Copper deficiency during parenteral nutrition: a report of four pediatric cases. Nutrition in Clinical Practice 19:305-308, 2004 (June issue).58. Kerner JA Jr., Garcia-Careaga M, Fisher AA, Poole RL: Treatment of catheter occlusion in pediatric patients. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition: 30:573-581, 2006 (January-February).59. Garcia-Careaga M, Kerner JA Jr.: Gastrointestinal manifestations of food allergies in pediatric patients. Nutrition in Clinical Practice 20:526-535, 2005 (October).60. Riley MR, Burtelow M., Garcia, M, Cox K, Berquist W, Kerner J Jr: Unusual Presentation of Hepatic Infantile Hemangioendothelioma. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 42:109-113, 2006 (January).61. Kerner JA Jr, Poole RL: The use of intravenous fat in neonates. Nutrition in Clinical Practice. 21:374-380, 2006 (August).62. Blaney M, Shen V, Kerner J, et al.: Alteplase for the treatment of central venous catheter occlusion in children: results of a prospective, open-label, single arm study (CAPS Trial). Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (JVIR)—in press.63. Wu PA, Kerner JA, Berquist WE. Parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis related to parental care. Nutrition in Clinical Practice 21:291-295, 2006 (June).NON PEER REVIEWED ARTICLES (11)1. Poirier L and Kerner J: Honesty with patients. Nursing 77, p. 4, June 1977, (Letter).2. Poirier L and Kerner J: Treating the acute leukemia patient. Nursing 78. 8:66, 1978.3. Ow-Wing SD and Kerner J: An alternative label. Am J Hospital Pharmacy 38:628, 1981, (Letter).4. Kerner J: Pooled donor milk. Milk Banking International News 1:2, 1982.5. Sunshine P and Kerner J Jr: The management of infants with short-gut syndrome. Proceedings of the International Pediatric Association Symposium on Infant and Young Child Feeding, Ankara, Turkey, November 27-29, 1982.6. Kerner JA Jr: Intravenous lipids in the newborn: potential complications and monitoring techniques. Neonatology Letter Vol. II, No. 3, 1984.7. Kerner J, Polk B: The Peptamen study at Stanford. Rumblings (the newsletter of the National Foundation for Ileitis and Colitis) 9(1):1-6, March, 1990.8. Kerner J: Youth update: ask the doctor (about inflammatory bowel disease). Rumblings, p. 11-12, June, 1996.9. Fisher AA, Poole RL, Machie R, Chinn S, Baugh N, Utley K, Kerner JA Jr: Clinical pathway for pediatric parenteral nutrition. Journal of Pediatric Pharmacy Practice 3(6):329-335, 1998.10. Chad Z, Benoit D, Gold M, Ipp M, Kerner JA Jr., Seidman E, Tannenbaum D, Watson W, Zlotkin S: Approach to the infant with suspected formula intolerance: the role of formula selection. Published as a newsletter in Paediatric and Child Health, Canadian Journal of CME, Le Medicin du Quebec, 1999.11. Davies Y, Kerner JA: Making a Broadway production out of fever and abdominal pain. Contemporary Pediatrics, 2003 20:21-24. BOOKSKerner JA Jr (ed): Manual of pediatric parenteral nutrition. New York, John Wiley & Sons, March 1983.
    • BOOK CHAPTERS (44) Chapters (in the above textbook) 1. Kerner JA Jr: Indications for parenteral nutrition in pediatrics 2. Hattner JA and Kerner JA Jr: Nutritional assessment of pediatric patients Specific Requirements of Pediatric Parenteral Nutrition 3. Kerner JA Jr: Caloric requirements 4. Kerner JA Jr: Fluid requirements 5. Kerner JA Jr: Carbohydrate requirements 6. Kerner JA Jr: Protein requirements 7. Kerner JA Jr: Fat requirements 8. Kerner JA Jr: Kerner JA Jr: Vitamin requirements 9. Kerner JA Jr: Trace element requirements Parenteral Nutrition Complications 10. Kerner JA Jr: Technical complications 11. Kerner JA Jr: Metabolic complications Practical Aspects 12. Kerner JA Jr: Monitoring of the patient on parenteral nutrition 13. Poole RL and Kerner JA Jr: The nutrition support team 14. Kerner JA Jr: Transition from parenteral to enteral feedings Special Considerations 15. Kerner JA Jr: The use of umbilical catheters for parenteral nutrition 16. Kerner JA Jr: Cyclic TPN 17. Kerner JA Jr: Home parenteral nutritionAdditional Chapters 18. Sunshine P and Kerner JA Jr: The use of intravenous fat emulsions in preterm infants, in Nutritional Adaptation of the Gastrointestinal Tract of the Newborn, (eds. Kretchmer N, Minkowski A), Raven Press, New York, Nestle Nutrition Workshop Series, Vol. 3, p. 163, 1983. 19. Stevenson DK and Kerner JA Jr: Nutrition of growth retarded and macrosomic infants. Frontiers in Clinical Nutrition, (ed. Kretchmer N), Aspen Systems Corporation, Rockville, MD, p. 87, 1986. 20. Kerner JA Jr: Monitoring of pediatric parenteral nutrition in the hospital and at home, in Total Parenteral Nutrition - Indications, utilization, complications, and pathophysiologic considerations, (ed. Lebenthal E), Raven Press, New York, p. 2231, 1986. 21. Malkani A, Kerner JA Jr: Nutritional management of the depressed infant, in Fetal and Neonatal Brain Injury: Mechanisms, Management, and the Risk of Practice, (eds. Stevenson DK, Sunshine P), B.C. Decker, Inc., Toronto, p. 159, 1989. 22. Kerner JA Jr: Parenteral nutrition, in Pediatric Gastrointestinal Disease, (eds. Walker WA, et al), B.C. Decker, Inc., Toronto, p. 1645-1675, 1991. 23. Poole R, Kerner JA Jr: Practical steps in prescribing intravenous feeding, in Intravenous Feeding of the Neonate, (eds. Yu V, MacMahon RA), Edward Arnold, London, p. 259-264, 1992. 24. Kerner JA Jr, Poole R: Metabolic monitoring and nutritional assessment, in Intravenous Feeding of the Neocate, (eds. Yu V, MacMahon RA), Edward Arnold, London, p. 207-233, 1992. 25. Kerner JA Jr: Neonatal parenteral nutrition, in Diseases of the Fetus and Newborn: Genetics, pathology, Imaging and Management, 2nd Edition, Chapman and Hall, London, p. 1417-1443, 1995. 26. Kerner JA Jr: Parenteral nutrition, in Pediatric Gastrointestinal Disease, Second Edition (eds. Walker WA, et al.), Mosby-Year Book, St. Louis, p. 1904-1951, 1996.
    • 27. Kerner JA Jr, Malkani A, Wenner WJ Jr: Nutritional support of the asphyxiated infant, in Stevenson DK, Sunshine P (Eds.), Fetal and Neonatal Brain Injury: Mechanisms, Management, and Risks of Practice, 2nd edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, p. 462-479, 1997. 28. Kerner JA Jr: Parenteral Nutrition, in the 4th edition of the American Academy of Pediatrics Pediatric Nutrition Handbook, Chapter 20, p. 285-305, 1998. 29. Baugh N, Recupero M, Kerner JA Jr: Nutritional Requirements, in A.S.P.E.N., Nutrition Support Practice Manual, Chapter 24, p. 24-1 to 24-13, 1998. 30. Kerner J, Lewis C, Torrey M: Pediatrics including pediatric oncology, in Nausea and Vomiting: Overview, Challenges, Practical Treatments, New Perspectives (eds. Blum RH, Heinrichs WL), Whurr Publishers Ltd, London, pgs. 465-474, 2000. 31. Mascarenhas MR, Kerner JA Jr, Stallings VA: Parenteral and enteral nutrition, in Pediatric Gastrointestinal Disease, 3rd edition (eds. Walker WA, et al.), B.C. Decker, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, pgs. 1705-1752, 2000. 32. Nishioka FY, Poole RL, Kerner JA Jr: Selecting a home infusion company, in Guidelines for Pediatric Home Health Care (ed. McConnell MS) American Academy of Pediatrics, Elk Grove Village, IL, pgs. 97-103, 2002. 33. Garcia-Careaga M, Kerner JA Jr: Malabsorption, in Behrman RE (Ed), Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 17th edition, pgs. 1257- 1272, 2003. 34. Kerner JA, Hattner JAT: Undernutrition and refeeding syndrome in children. In Hark L and Morrison G (eds). Medical Nutrition and Disease. 3rd ed. Blackwell Publishing, Malden, Massachusetts, pgs. 160-166, 2003. 35. Kerner JA: Nutritional support of the asphyxiated infant, in Sunshine P, Stevenson DK, Benitz W (eds.) Fetal and Neonatal Brain Injury, 3rd edition, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K, pgs. 791-814, 2003. 36. Kerner JA Jr: Parenteral nutrition. In Walker WA, Watkins JB, Duggan C (eds). Nutrition in Pediatrics, Third Edition, B.C. Decker, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, pgs. 957-985, 2003. 37. Kerner JA Jr: Parenteral Nutrition, in the 5th edition of the American Academy of Pediatrics Pediatric Nutrition Handbook. Ronald E. Kleinman (ed.), Chapter 22, p. 369-389, 2004. 38. Garcia-Careaga M, Kerner JA Jr: Munchausen Syndrome By Proxy, in Goldworth A, Frankel L (Eds.), Ethics in Pediatrics, Cambridge University Press, p. 55-66, 2005. 39. Garcia-Careaga M, Castillo RO, Kerner JA Jr: Intestinal Transplantation, in Goldworth A, Frankel L (Eds.) Ethics in Pediatrics, Cambridge University Press, p. 190-195, 2005. 40. Nguyen PC, Kerner JA Jr: Home Parenteral Nutrition Support in Pediatrics, In Ireton-Jones CS, DeLegge M (eds.) Handbook of Home Nutrition Support, Jones and Bartlett Publishers (in press). 41. Kerner JA Jr: Nishioka FY, Poole RL: Selecting a Home Infusion Program or Company. In Imaizumi SO (ed): Guidelines for Pediatric Home Care, 2nd edition; American Academy of Pediatrics (in press). 42. Nguyen PC, Kerner JA Jr: Gastrointestinal allergy, in Hoekelman’s Primary Pediatric Care, 5th edition. American Academy of Pediatrics (in press). 43. Safta A, Kerner JA Jr: Gluten-sensitive enteropathy, in Hoekelman’s Primary Pediatric Care, 5th edition. American Academy of Pediatrics (in press). 44. Hurwitz M, Kerner JA Jr: Parenteral nutrition, in Walker WA, Watkins JB, Duggar C (eds.) Nutrition in Pediatrics, 4th edition; BC Decker (in press).Continuing Education Video1. Kerner JA: McClave S, Zaloga G: Peptides...a new perspective. Clintec Nutrition Company, 1994.2. Kerner J: Whey to grow. Nestle Clinical Nutrition, 2003.
    • 3. Kerner J: “Primary prevention of food allergies: current and new approaches,” in Interactive Lecture Series: Current Issues, Trendsand Advances in Nutrition. Nestle Canada, Inc., 2004.Teaching Guides for Students, Housestaff1. Hattner J, Kerner J: Infant Formula Composition, 1989. Revised 1991, 1993, 1995.2. Hattner J, Kerner J: Pediatric Formula Composition, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2005.3. Kerner J: Guidelines for parenteral and enteral nutrition in infants and children. 1979. Revised 1981, 1983, 1985, 1992, 1994, 1996.4. Sato S, Kerner J: Total parenteral nutrition, in The Nursery Guide (eds. VanMeurs K, et al.) p. 57-61, 1997.5. Sunshine P, Kerner J: Total parenteral nutrition, in The Nursery Guide For LPCH (eds. VanMeurs K, Onstad S), p. 57-61, 2001.6. Sunshine P, Kerner J: Total parenteral nutrition, in The Nursery Guide for LPCH (eds. Van Meurs K, Rohovits S), p. 42-46, 2002.7. Sunshine P, Kerner J: Total parenteral nutrition, in The Nursery Guide for LPCH (eds. VanMeurs K, Rohovits S) p. 48-53, 2004.8. Cohen RS, Kerner J: Total parenteral nutrition, in The Nursery Guide 2005 (eds. Van Meurs K, Rohoviits, Farmer A), p. 71-78, 2005. ABSTRACTSOf 67 published abstracts: the 10 most significant in the last ten years are:1. Baier-Andrew L, Nieuwesteeg L, Kerner JA Jr: Multichannel ambulatory pump adds a new dimension to pediatric home care. Journal of Investigative Medicine 44:189A, 1996.2. Pratt K, Poole R, Hammes S, Kerner JA Jr: Establishing a nutrition support team at a children’s hospital in the current era of fixed reimbursement. Journal of Investigative Medicine 44:195A, 1996.3. Porcelli P, Schanler R, Greer F, Chan G, Gross S, Mehta N, Spear M, Kerner J, Flores L, Terry D, Minervini G, Euler A: A new human milk fortifier (HMF): a multicenter report. Pediatric Research 40:548, 1996 (presented as a poster at the European Society for Pediatric Research meeting in 1996).4. Andolina-Fisher A, Poole RL, Machie R, Tsang C, Baugh N, Utley K, Kerner JA Jr: A clinical pathway for pediatric parenteral nutrition. 21st Clinical Congress Program Manual (ASPEN 1997), p 454 (presented as a poster at the ASPEN annual meeting in 1997).5. Fisher AA, Deffenbaugh CA, Poole RL, Garcia M, Kerner JA: Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (Alteplase) for restoring patency to occluded central venous access devices in infants and children. Presented as a poster at the INS (Infusion Nurses Society) meeting, Phoenix, AZ, May 7, 2002.6. Hurwitz M, Garcia MG, Kerner JA Jr: Copper deficiency during TPN: a report of four cases. Nutrition Week 2003 Program Booklet, p. 106 (presented as a poster at Nutrition Week, San Antonio, Texas, 2003), and Nutrition in Clinical Practice 18(2):185, 2003.7. Kerner J Jr, Garcia M, Riley M, and Berquist W: Hemangioendothelioma of the liver presenting as fulminant hepatic failure in an infant. Presented as a “clinical vignette” poster, NASPGHAN Annual Meeting, October 2003.8. Fridge JL, Kerner J, Cox K: The specific carbohydrate diet – a treatment for Crohn’s Disease: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 39, Suppl. 1, p. S299-S300, 2004 (June issue) and presented as a poster at the 2nd World Congress of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Paris, France, July 2004.
    • 9. Poole RL, Rey LL, Hintz SR, Mackenzie NI, Kerner JA Jr: Aluminum exposure from parenteral nutrition: meeting the new FDA regulation. Clinical Nutrition Week A.S.P.E.N. National Meeting, Dallas, Texas, February 14, 2006. Program Syllabus, Clinical Nutrition Week, Volume 2, pg. 635.10. Poole RL, Hintz SR, Mackenzie NI, Kerner John A Jr: Aluminum exposure in neonates from parenteral nutrition. Pediatric Academic Societies’ 2006 Annual Meeting, April 29, 2006; Program Syllabus, p. 64.11. Poole RL, Safta AM, Hintz Susan R, Mackenzie Nicol I, Kerner John A. Aluminum Exposure in Neonates from Parenteral Nutrition. Poster presented at Neonatal Nutrition: Assessment, Intervention & Management, October 12-13,2006, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
    • INVITED PRESENTATIONSOf the more than 100 invited presentations, the 16 most significant over the last ten years are:1. “Managing the Chronically Ill Child in the Home Environment” Comprehensive Care of the Chronically Ill Child. (LPCH Course, Hawaii), 9/30/962. “Practical and Controversial Issues in Neonatal Nutritional Support,” Phoenix Neonatal Research Forum, 3/20/97.3. “Munchausen’s Syndrome By Proxy – From the Headlines to the Frontlines,” Fifth Annual Pediatric Update (LPCH), 7/19/97.4. “Pediatric Issues in IBD”. Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA) Conference on Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Stanford, CA, 3/4/98.5. “Neonatal Nutrition Support,” ICN Grand Rounds, Washoe Medical Center, Reno, Nevada (affiliate of the University of Nevada), 5/5/99.6. “Management of Chronic Diarrhea and Malabsorptive Syndromes,” Advances in the Practice of Pediatrics: San Diego 2002, (sponsored by: Children’s Hospital and Health Center, San Diego, CA), 2/23/02.7. “Hepatic complications of TPN” at the Annual PPAG (Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group) meeting, Dana Point, CA, Oct 1, 2003.8. “Overview of the Nutrition Academic Awards and a new innovative approach to nutrition education using a web-based curriculum” (talk given with Jenn Stringer, MLIS) Feb. 8, 2004 at the Medical Practice Session, Nutrition Week, Las Vegas, NV.9. “Preventing and treating cholestasis” at Symposium on Managing the Long-Term Pediatric Home TPN Patient, Feb. 11, 2004, Nutrition Week, Las Vegas, NV.10. “The Spectra of Gastrointestinal Food Allergies” at The Sixth Advances in Pediatric Nutrition (sponsored by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine), June 15, 2004.11. “Patient Safety and the Neonatal/Pediatric TPN Process” at Clinical Nutrition Week (A.S.P.E.N.) January 30, 2005 (with Robert Poole, Pharm.D.)12. “Treatment of catheter occlusion in pediatric patients” at “Evidence-Based Approach to Optimal Management of HPEN Access”, Orlando, FL; January 28, 2005.13. Formula Allergy and Intolerance”, for: Grand Rounds, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, 4/19/05, and for: Thirteenth Newborn and Pediatric Symposium sponsored by Kosair Children’s Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky; Sept. 30, 2005.14. “Evaluation of Malabsorption in Pediatrics” for Thirteenth Newborn and Pediatric Symposium, sponsored by Kosair Children’s Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky; Sept. 30, 2005.15. “Pediatric Enteral Feedings” at the Seventh Annual Advances in Pediatric Nutrition, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. March 21, 2006.16. “The Development of a successful web-based nutrition curriculum for medical students (presented with Jenn Stringer) at Experimental Biology 2006 meeting; workshop: Nutrition Academic Award—Nutrition Education Initiatives for Medical Students. Moscone Convention Center, San Francisco, CA. April 1, 2006.Non-Medical Publications1. Kerner JA Jr: For Giants: An exciting third. San Francisco Examiner, April 9, 1977, p 30.2. Kerner JA Jr: A dedicated fan previews the 1979 Giants. San Francisco Examiner, March 30, 1979, p 39.3. Kerner JA Jr: A fan rates the Giants. San Francisco Examiner, April 7, 1980, p 37.
    • 4. Kerner JA Jr: Love, marriage, and the Giants. California Living Magazine. May 10, 1981, p 12.5. Kerner J: Spotlight on several of the San Francisco Giants. Campus Report 16(4):13; October 12, 1983.6. Kerner J Jr: Jim Gott: excited to be a new father and a Giant. Inside Pitch 2(3):2, 1985.7. Kerner J Jr: On the road with Scott Garrelts. Inside Pitch 2(3):7, 1985.8. Kerner J Jr: On the road with Scott Garrelts. San Francisco Giants 1985 Souvenir Scorebook, p 28.9. Kerner J Jr: Willie Mac on Will “The Thrill”. Giants Magazine Vol 1, No. 2, p 42.10. Kerner J Jr: Doctor cures spring fever with trip to Giants’ camp. Scottsdale Progress, Saturday March 25, 1989, p 11.11. Kerner JA Jr, Vereschagin K: The Giants’ sports medicine team. Giants Magazine Vol. 4, No 1, p 59, 1989.12. Kerner JA Jr: Overcoming adversity: Giant’s Trevor Wilson strikes out Crohn’s. Rumblings (newsletter of the S.F. Bay Area Chapter of CCFA) 9(6):1, 1991.13. Kerner J: Giants honor transplant team. Connections, Vol. 2, No. 8, p. 2, May 8, 1998.14. Kerner J: Earned throw. Medical Staff Update, Stanford University Hospital, Vol. 22, No. 5, p. 1, May 1998.15. Kerner J: Organ donor awareness at 3Com Park. “The Beat Goes On” (California Transplant Donor Network Newsletter), July 1, 1998, p. 11.16. Kerner J: Organ donor awareness at 3Com Park. ASMHTP Newsletter (American Society of Minority Health and Transplant Professionals newsletter). Summer 1998, Vol. 3, No. 3, p. 1.17. Kerner J Jr, Guerrero S: Give thanks, give life. ASMHTP Newsletter. Vol. 6 No. 1, Fall 2000.18. Kerner JA Jr: “Give life…be a donor” day at Pac Bell Park. El Observador, May 24-30, 2001, p. 10.19. Kerner J: Organ donor program benefits from funds raised by SF Giants. Stanford Report, Vol XXXIII, No. 30, May 23, 2001, p. 11.20. Kerner J: “Give life, be a donor” day at Giants’ Pac Bell Park. UNOS Update (monthly publication of the United Network for Organ Sharing), July 2001, p. 28.21. Kerner J: Organ donor awareness. Medical Staff Update (Stanford Hospital and Clinics), Vol. 25, No. 6, June 2001, p. 11.22. Kerner JA Jr, Guerrero S: “Give life…be a donor” day at Pac Bell Park. ASMHTP (American Society of Minority Health and Transplant Professionals) News, Vol 6, Number 2, Summer 2001, p. 3-4.23. Kerner J: SF Giants event raises liver transplant funds. Stanford Report, Vol. XXXIV, No. 36, July 24, 2002, p. 10.24. Kerner J: SF Giants event raises liver transplant funds. Medical Staff Update (Stanford Hospital and Clinics) Vol. 26, No. 8, August/September 2002, p. 2.25. Kerner JA Jr: Giants encourage organ donation. The Stanford Liver Letter, Vol. 6, Issue 1, June 2002, p. 1-2.26. Kerner J: San Francisco Giants’ “Give Life, Be a Donor Day,” UNOS Update, September-October 2002, p. 11.27. Kerner J: San Francisco Giants sixth annual organ donor awareness day. Packard Progress, May 21, 2003, p. 3.28. Kerner J: Successful organ donor awareness effort. Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, MD E-News, May 28, 2003, p. 3.29. Kerner J: Giants event began by Stanford Physician raises funds for organ donation. Medical Staff Update (Stanford Hospital and Clinics) Volume 27, No. 6, June 2003, p. 2.
    • 30. Kerner JA Jr: SF Giants host sixth annual organ donor awareness day. UNOS Update, May-June 2003, p. 19.31. Kerner JA Jr: Lori Gardner dies at age 39. UNOS Update, January-February 2004, p. 29.32. Kerner J: SF Giants hold donor day event. Stanford Report, June l9, 2004, p. 5.33. Kerner J: Organ Donor Day. Medical Staff Update, July 2004, Volume 28(7), p. 1.34. Kerner JA Jr.: Lori Gardner Honored at SF Giants Awareness Day. UNOS Update, September-October 2004, p. 12.35. Kerner J: Fresno State Softball Program Promotes Donor Awareness. UNOS Update, September-October 2004, p. 16.36. Kerner J: 8th Annual Organ Donor Awareness Day at SBC Park. Medical Staff Update (Stanford Hospital and Clinics) 29(7): July 2005, p. 737. Kerner J: San Francisco Giants’ Organ Donor Awareness Day. Packard Progress, July 6, 2005, p. 5.38. Kerner JA Jr: SF Giants Hold Eighth Annual Donor Day. UNOS Update, September-October 2005, p. 14-15.39. Kerner J: Successful San Francisco Immunization Coalition Event. Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, MD E-News, 5/26/06, p. 3.40. Kerner J: Organ Donor Awareness Day with the San Francisco Giants. Packard Progress, 8/23/06, p.3.41. Kerner J: 9TH Annual San Francisco Giants’ Organ Donor Awareness Day a Success. Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, MD E- News, 8/24/06, p.4.
    • TRAINEES OF DR. JOHN KERNER AS DIRECTOR OF FELLOWSHIP IN PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGYName Period of Mentoring Current PositionRichard Quan, M.D. 1982-1984 Associate Professor, Division of Pediatric G-I and Nutrition UC Davis Medical Center 2516 Stockton Blvd., Titon II Sacramento, CA 95817 Phone: 916-734-2257Irene Takahashi, M.D. 1984-1985 Pediatric Gastroenterologist Kaiser Permanente, South San Francisco 395 Hickey Blvd Daly City, CA 94015 Phone: 650-301-4727Edward Rose, M.D. 1985-1987 Director of Pediatric Gastroenterology University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center 2211 Lomas Blvd., N.E., ACC-3W Albuquerque, NM 87106 Phone: 505-272-5551Anjali Malkani, M.D. 1987-1990 Clinical Assistant Professor, Division of Pediatric G-I University of Maryland Medicine 22 S. Greene Street Baltimore, MD 21201 Phone: 1-800-373-4111David Brent Polk, M.D. 1987-90 Director of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Professor, Department of Pediatrics Vanderbilt University School of Medicine 21st Avenue & Garland Street, S-4322MCN Nashville, TN 37232-2576 Phone: 615-322-7449Manuel Garcia, M.D. 1988-1990 Clinical Professor, Division of Pediatric G-I, Stanford University Medical Center 750 Welch Road, Suite 116 Palo Alto, CA 94304 Phone: 650-723-5070Elizabeth Shepard, M.D. 1990-1991 Clinical Associate Professor Division of General Pediatrics Stanford University Medical Center 750 Welch Road, Suite 325 Palo Alto, CA 94304 Phone: 650-725-8289
    • Mike Durant, M.D. 1991-1994 Pediatric Gastroenterology Oakland Kaiser 280 W. MacArthur Blvd. Oakland, CA 94611 Phone: 510-752-7140Eric Sibley, M.D. 1993-1996 Assistant Professor, Division of Pediatric G-I Stanford University Medical Center 750 Welch Road, Suite 116 Palo Alto, CA 94304 Phone: 650-723-5070Norberto Rodriguez, M.D. 1998-2001 Assistant Professor, Pediatric GI University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center 1935 Motor Street, Suite C230 Dallas, TX 95235 Phone: 214-456-8032C. Allan Pratt, M.D. 1999-2002 Pediatric Gastroenterologist Pediatric Consultants of Alaska, Inc. 1200 Airport Heights Road, Suite 230 Anchorage, AK 99508 Phone: 907-276-5517Yinka Davies, M.D. 2000-2003 Adjunct Assistant Professor Stanford University Medical Center and Pediatric Gastroenterologist Sutter Memorial Hospital Department of Pediatrics 5301 “F” Street, Suite 308 Sacramento, CA 95819 Phone: 916-733-1455Melissa Hurwitz, M.D. 2001-2004 Assistant Professor Pediatric GI, Hepatology and Nutrition Stanford University Medical Center 750 Welch Road, Suite 116 Palo Alto, CA 94304 Phone: 650-723-5070Jacqueline Fridge, M.D. 2002-2005 Adjunct Assistant Professor of Pediatrics Stanford University Medical Center and Pediatrician Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology Children’s Hospital Oakland 747 52nd Street Oakland, CA 94609-1809 Phone: 510-428-3058
    • Matthew Riley, M.D. 2002-2005 Pediatric Gastroenterologist 501 N. Graham Street, Suite 335 Portland, OR 97227 Phone: 503-283-1825 Fax: 503-249-3782Christine Nguyen, M.D. 2003-2006 Adjunct Assistant Professor Stanford University Medical Center and Staff Pediatric Gastroenterologist California Pacific Medical Center Pediatric Department 2340 Clay Street 3rd Floor San Francisco, CA 94115 Phone: 415-600-3477 Fax: 415-600-3506Anca Safta, M.D. 2004-2007 current fellow at Stanford in Pediatric G-I/NutritionSameera Mian, M.D. 2005-2008 current fellow at Stanford in Pediatric G-I/NutritionAllison Wong, M.D. 2005-2008 current fellow at Stanford in Pediatric G-I/NutritionJames Lue, M.D. 2006-2009 current fellow at Stanford in Pediatric G-I/NutritionAnita Talisetti, M.D. 2006-2009 current fellow at Stanford in Pediatric G-I/Nutrition GRANTS/GIFTS FOR CLINICAL RESEARCHINTERNAL FUNDING:1. “Magnesium assessment in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and cystic fibrosis” Principal Investigator Biomedical Research Support Grant NIH 2S07 RR 5353-22, 1983 $7,5002. “Magnesium assessment in neonates” Principal Investigator Biomedical Research Support Grant NIH 2S07 RR 5353-24, 1985 $10,000EXTERNAL FUNDING: MEAD-JOHNSON NUTRITION DIVISION:3. “Evaluation of Enfamil HRI and whey-based Enfamil premature formula fed sequentially in high risk premature infants.” Co-Principal Investigator Mead-Johnson Nutrition Division; Grant-in-aid, 1980 $6,500
    • 4. “Evaluation of carbohydrate tolerance through pulmonary excretion rate of H2 as an index of the functional capacity of the intestine to effectively utilize breast milk and commercially prepared infant formulae (Mead-Johnson).” Co-Principal Investigator Scientific Relations Grant $55,000* 1981-1983 $15,000* 1983-19845. The effect of additives, dilution, and microwaving on three key anti-infective components of human milk.” Principal Investigator Scientific Relations Grant $5,000* 1984 $12,000* 1985-19866. “The evaluation of human milk fortifier, soy formulas, and antibody to E. coli on the growth of E. coli in human milk.” Principal Investigator Scientific Relations Grant $15,000* 1986-19877. “Growth of E. coli in milk products supplemented with LT antibody.” Principal Investigator Scientific Relations Grant $10,000* 1987-19888. “Anti-infective factors in human milk – comparison of the 2 additives human milk fortifier and Similac Natural Care.” Principal Investigator Unrestricted Funds (gift) $10,000* 1988-1989 ABBOTT LABORATORIES:9. “The evaluation of physiologic intravenous fat emulsion in neonates.” Principal Investigator Period: 12/5/87 - 12/4/88 $10,000 gift CYSTIC FIBROSIS FOUNDATION:10. “Second Year Clinical Fellowship” for Brent Polk, M.D., for GI training Proposal written by J.A. Kerner Period: 7/1/88 - 6/30/89 $22,400*Monies used primary to fund a research technician.
    • CLINITEC NUTRITION COMPANY:11. A) “The use of an intermittent elemental diet (Peptamen) regimen in the treatment of children with Crohn’s Disease and growth failure.” Principal Investigator Period: 1/1/89 - 12/31/89 $40,592 (indirect costs = $9,125) - covered 10% salary support B) Continuation of 11.A. Principal Investigator Period: 1/1/90 - 12/31/90 $37,500 (gift) BRISTOL-MYERS SQUIBB/MEAD JOHNSON:12. “Role of specific fatty acids in premature formula on growth, acceptance, tolerance, blood lipids and selected physiological parameters in very low birth weight neonates.” Co-Principal Investigator Period: 6/1/91 - 5/31/93. 10% effort $60,000 direct and indirect costs WYETH AYERST RESEARCH:13. “A multicenter trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of a new human milk fortifier in preterm infants receiving human milk.” Principal Investigator Period: November 1, 1994 through October 31, 1995 $1585 for each patient who completes the study14. “Ultrastructural colonization of central venous catheters treated with prophylactic urokinase” Principal Investigator: Marcia Ryder, M.S., R.N., C.N.S.N. Co-Investigators: J Kerner, M Garcia, A Andolina Period: 1999-2000 Amount Granted: $68,000 (Study had to be halted when bacterial contamination at the production plant resulted in urokinase being taken off the market) PROJECT RECEIVING HUMAN SUBJECT APPROVAL – funding pending:15. “The effect of choline-supplementation on total parenteral nutrition (TPN)-associated cholestasis in the neonate.” Co-Investigator IRB approval 7/7/98
    • GENENTECH:16. "An Open Label, Single-Arm Clinical Trial of the Safety and Efficacy of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator (rt-PA) for Restoration of Function to Central Venous Access Devices." Principal Investigator: J. Kerner Co-Investigators: M Garcia, C Twist Total Funded: $28,138 Period: 10/15/99 - 06/30/0117. “Cathflo Activase (Alteplase) Pediatric Study (CAPS).” Principal Investigator: John A. Kerner Co-Investigator: Manuel Garcia Total Funded: $24,200 Period: 09/10/02 – 12/31/03 PBM PRODUCTS, INC. THROUGH QUINTILES:18. A 16-week Multi-Center Growth Study of Two Cow’s Milk Based Term Infant Formulas: One of which is supplemented with Arachidonic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid and one of which is commercially available. Co-Investigator, (01/28/03 – 09/23/03).19. A 16-Week Multi-Center Growth Study of Two Soy Term Infant Formulas: One of which is supplemented with Arachidonic acid and Docosahexaenoic acid and one of which is commercially available. Co-Investigator, (01/28/03 – 09/23/03) CYSTIC FIBROSIS FOUNDATION:20. Second Year Clinical Fellowship for Jackie Fridge, M.D. for GI Training. Proposal: written by J.A. Kerner, R. Moss, July 2003-June 2004. INNOVATIONS IN PATIENT CARE GRANT, LUCILE PACKARD CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL:21. “Aluminum Exposure from Parenteral Nutrition at LPCH: Meeting the New FDA Regulation” Co-Principal Investigator, $6,000; 2005-2006. GRANTS FOR TEACHINGNUTRITION COURSES:1. “Nutrition of the High Risk Obstetrical Patient and High Risk Infant.” Associate Program Director Maternal and Child Health Training Grant Grant #MCT-000984-01 -- >MCT-000984-07 10/1/78 through 9/30/86 Total Direct and Indirect Costs: $280,000 Provided 5% salary/year2. “Advances in Perinatal and Pediatric Nutrition.” Course Director Educational Grants from Carnation/Nestlé: A) for 1989 course (included 5% salary/yr.) B) for 1990 to prepare for 1991 course (=5% salary plus fringe benefits) C) for 1991 course D) to prepare for 1993 course E) for 1993 course F) for 1994 to prepare for 1995 course G) for 1995 course
    • H) for 1996 to prepare for 1997 course I) for 1997 course J) for 1998 to prepare for 1999 course K) for 1999 course L) for 2000 to prepare for 2001 course M) for 2001 course N) for 2002 to prepare for 2003 course O) for 2003 course P) for 2004 to prepare for 2005 course Q) for 2005 course R) for 2006 to prepare for 2007 course3. Education Grant of $2,000 from Carnation in 1990 to allow me to attend Dr. Robert Suskind’s “Symposium on Recent Advances in Pediatric Nutrition,” in New Orleans 2/26/90 - 3/2/904. Associate Director, NIH: NIDDK Fellowship Training Grant, 1998-2003; total revenue ∼ $750,000 over 5 years.5. NIH Grant: 1 K07 HL04325-01 Project Period: 9/28/2000 - 08/31/2005 Nutrition Academic Award Principal Investigator; Title: An Integrated Web-Based Nutrition Curriculum Total Award: ≈ $800,000 over 5 years (extended to a 6th year – ending 8/31/06) Pays 20% of Dr. Kerners salary per year6. Web-based Simulation of Patients (Web-SP) – Implementation and evaluation of a method to improve case based learning in medicine. Grant was received from the Wallenberg Global Learning Network (WGLN). P.I. was Uno Fors @ the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. Co-P.I. John A. Kerner, M.D., @ Stanford. Co-P.I. Brita Winsa M.D., Ph.D., Uppsala University, Sweden, 2003-2004. Paid $10,000 toward Dr. Kerner’s salary.7. Fellowship Funding (in addition to #10, #20): Paul and Yuanabi Ramsay Endowed Fellowship for James Lue, M.D. for July 2006 through June 2009 (full funding for 3 years) --proposal written by John A. Kerner ABSTRACTS (67)1. Kerner JA, Gemes DL, Dawber NJ, and Thaler MM: Perinatal bilirubin metabolism: Effects of hemolysis. Pediatr Res 6:405, 1972 (presented at the 1972 Society for Pediatric Research meetings).2. Renschler A, Kerner J, and Holtzman D: Reye’s syndrome and Landry-Guillain-Barre syndrome seen concurrently in a child. In Reye’s Syndrome, edited by J. Dennis Pollack, Proceedings of the Reye’s Conference sponsored by the Children’s Hospital Research Foundation, Columbus, Ohio, Grune and Stratton, 1975, p 409-410.3. Kerner J, Harvey B, and Lewiston NJ: A retrospective study of family function following loss of a cystic fibrosis child. Cystic Fibrosis Club Abstracts, Seventeenth Annual Meeting, April 27, 1976.4. Berde C, Kerner J, Hudson B, and Johnson J: A free fatty acid binding index for serum. Pediatr Res 12:502, 1978.5. Berde C, Rasmussen F, Benitz W, Kerner J, Johnson J, and Wennberg R: Binding of bilirubin and fatty acids in the sera of neonates. Clin Res 27:134A, 1979 (presented at the 1979 Western Society for Pediatric Research meetings).6. Kerner J, Hattner JA, and Sunshine P: The use of skinfold thickness and mid-upper arm circumferences in the nutritional assessment of low birth weight infants. Pediatr Res 13:401, l979.7. Kerner JA, and Sunshine P: Familial intractable secretory diarrhea. Clin Res 28:96A, 1980 (presented at the 1980 Western Society for Pediatric Research meetings).
    • 8. Kerner J, Cassani R, Hurwitz R, and Berde C: Monitoring intravenous fat emulsions (IVF) in neonates with the fatty acid/serum albumin molar ratio (FA/SA). J Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 4:592, 1980 (presented at American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition meetings, February 1981.).9. Landon C, Kerner JA, Castillo R, Lewiston NJ, Adams L, and Whalen R: Oral correction of essential fatty acid deficiency in cystic fibrosis. J Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 4:591, 1980 (presented at American Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition meetings, February 1981).10. Kerner JA, Stevenson DK, Hattner JA, Cohen RS, and Schwartz HC: The relationship of neonatal skinfold thickness to maternal glucose metabolism during the third trimester. Clin Res 29:128A, 1981.11. Ostrander CR, Cowan BE, Kerner JA, Stevenson DK, and Johnson JD: Simultaneous determinations of breath concentration and pulmonary excretion rate of hydrogen in newborns. Pediatr Res 15:543, 1981.12. Poole RL, Kerner JA Jr: Establishing a nutrition support team for an intensive care nursery. 16th Annual ASHP Midyear Clinical Meetings: Abstracts (presented December 1981).13. Poole R, Rupp C, Kerner J: Calcium and phosphorus in neonatal TPN solutions. J Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 5:580, 1981 (presented at ASAPEN meetings in San Francisco, February 1982).14. Cohen RS, Stevenson DK, Shahin SM, Ostrander CR, Kerner JA, and Johnson JD: Variability of newborn breath hydrogen. Pediatr Res 16:159A, 1982.15. D’Harlingue A, Stevenson DK, Shahin SM, Hopper AO, and Kerner JA: Monitoring the use of intravenous fat (IVF) in neonates. Pediatr Res 16:160A, 1982.16. Tsuboio KK, D’Harlingue A, Kwong LK, Stevenson DK, Kerner JA, Sunshine P: On the mechanism of normal intestinal lactase decline in the postweaned mammal. Clin Res 31:106A, 1983. (Presented at the 1983 Western Society for Pediatric Research meetings).17. Walsh ME, Marks AS, Lewiston NJ, Blessing-Moore JC, Kerner JA: Asymptomatic magnesium deficiency in patients with malabsorption. Cystic Fibrosis Club Abstracts, 24th Annual Meeting, May 7, 1983.18. Marks A, Walsh-Escarce ME, Lewiston NJ, Kerner JA: Asymptomatic magnesium (Mg) deficiency in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). J Am Coll Nutr (Presented at the American College of Nutrition’s annual meeting, September 1983).19. Quart KA, Poole RL, Mackenzie N, Stevenson DK, and Kerner JA Jr: The impact of computer-assisted parenteral nutrition (PN) for neonates. Pediatr Res 18:112A, 1984.20. Quart KA, Poole RL, Mackenzie N, Stevenson DK, and Kerner JA Jr: The impact of computer-assisted parenteral nutrition (PN) for neonates. J Perinatol 4:59, 1984 (Presented at the annual meeting of the California Perinatal Association, September 1984).21. Quan R, Rubinstein S, Lewiston N, Sunshine P, Kerner J: The effect of additives on anti-infective factors in human milk. Clin Res 33:142A, 1985.22. Tsuboi KK, Morril JS, Kwong LK, Quan R, Kerner J, Sunshine P: Growth and functional development of the rat enterocyte. Clin Res 33:116A, 1985 (presented at the Western Society of Pediatric Research meetings, 1985).23. Kerner J, Poole R, Inguillo D, Martin D, Yang C, Stevenson D: Evaluation of the safety of MVI Pediatric use in low birth weight infants by measuring serum vitamin E levels. 20th Annual ASHP Midyear Clinical Meetings: Abstracts. (Presented December 1985).24. Kerner JA, Poole R, Inguillo D, Martin D, Yang C, Stevenson DK: High vitamin E levels in premature infants on MVI Pediatric. Clin Res 34:138A, 1986. (Presented as a poster at the Western Society for Pediatric Research, Carmel, California, February 1986).25. Feng JJ, Kwong LK, Kerner JA, Stevenson DK, Castillo RO: Resumption of intestinal maturation upon reintroduction of intraluminal nutrients (ILN): functional and biochemical correlations. Clin Res 35:228A, 1987. (Presented at the Western Society for Pediatric Research, Feb., 1987).
    • 26. Rose E, Kerner J, Lombard C, Vargas J, Ament M: Ulcerative colitis of the small bowel: a new disease? Clin Res 35:209A, 1987.27. Kerner JA Jr, Quan R, Yang C, Lewiston N, Sunshine P, Stevenson DK: Effects of microwave thawing (MT) on anti-infective factors in human milk (HM). Pediatr Res 21:430A (#1542), 1987. (Presented at the Society for Pediatric Research, April, 1987).28. Feng JJ, Kwong LK, Kerner JA, Castillo RO: Characterization of intestinal development in absence of intraluminal nutrients (ILN) during weaning. Clin Res 36:224A, 1988. (presented at the Western Society for Pediatric Research, February 1988).29. Kerner JA, Yang CC: Inhibition of E. coli growth after the addition of specific antibody (ab) to E. Coli to infant formulas. Clin Res 36:225A, 1988.30. Modler S, Kerner JA Jr, Castillo RO, Vreman HJ, Stevenson DK: Relationship between breath and total hydrogen excretion rates in neonates. Clin Res 36:206A, 1988. (Presented at the Western Society for Pediatric Research, February 1988).31. Modler S, Kerner JA Jr, Castillo RO, Vreman HJ, Stevenson DK: Relationship between breath and total body hydrogen excretion rates in neonates. Pediatr Res 23(4) Part 2;4889A, 1988. (Presented at Society for Pediatric Research meetings, May 1988.)32. Kerner JA Jr, Yang CC, Stevenson DKL Effects of nutritional supplements on anti-infective factors in human milk (HM). Gastroenterology 94(5): A223, 1988 (Part 2, May 1988). (Presented at the American Gastroenterological Association meetings in May, 1988.)33. Malkani A, Abraham S, Hartman G, Shochat S, Castillo RO, Inguillo D, Martin D, Kerner J: Evaluation of a new fat emulsion (Liposyn II) in neonates. Clin Res 38:109A, 1990 (Presented at the Western Society for Pediatric Research meeting, February 1990).34. Polk DB, Hattner JAT, Kerner JA: Intermittent administration of a defined formula diet induces growth in adolescents with Crohn’s disease and growth failure. Clin Res 38:141A, 1990. (Presented at the Western Society for Pediatric Research meetings, February 1990).35. Polk DB, Hattner JAT, Kerner JA: Intermittent administration of a defined formula diet induces growth in adolescents with Crohn’s disease and growth failure. Pediatr Res 27 (No 4 Part 2):113A, 1990.36. Polk DB, Hattner JAT, Kerner JA: Growth failure in children with Crohn’s disease (CD) is reversible by intermittent administration of a defined formula diet. JPEN 15(1) Supplement: 23S, 1991. (Presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, San Francisco, CA 1991).37. Kerner J, Garcia M, Kreisl M, Rubin G, Parker B: Successful use of repeated ethanol (E) injections to clear central venous catheter (CVC) occlusion (O) after urokinase (U) failure. Fifteenth Clinical Congress of ASPEN, San Francisco, CA, 1991, p. 379. (Presented as a poster).38. Kerner JA, Polk DB, Hattner JAT: Improved growth and disease activity following intermittent administration of a defined formula diet in children with Crohn’s disease (CD). Trends in Inflammatory Bowel Disease 1992, Falk Symposium No. 66, Poster Abstracts, poster #34 (presented as a poster at the 1992 Falk Symposium).39. Kerner JA, Malkani A, Garcia M, Hattner JA, Polk DB: Safety and efficacy of Peptamen in pediatric patients. J Am Coll Nutrit 11:635, 1992. (presented as a poster at the annual meeting of the American College of Nutrition, October 1992, San Diego, CA).40. Baier-Andrew L, Nieuwesteeg L, Kerner JA: Multichannel ambulatory pump adds a new dimension to pediatric home care. Eighteenth Clinical Congress Program Manual (ASPEN 1994) p. 611 (presented as a poster).41. Sibley E, Garcia M, Kerner J: Endoscopic diagnosis of evolving asymmetric pyloric stenosis (presented as a poster at the 59th Annual American College of Gastroenterology meetings, San Francisco, September 19, 1995).42. Pratt K, Poole R, Hammas S, Kerner J: Establishment of a nutrition support team at a children’s hospital in the current era of fixed reimbursement. Nineteenth Clinical Congress Program Manual (ASPEN 1995), p. 600 (presented as a poster).43. Baier-Andrew L, Nieuwesteeg L, Kerner JA Jr: Multichannel ambulatory pump adds a new dimension to pediatric home care. Journal of Investigative Medicine 44:1889A, 1996.44. Pratt K, Poole R, Hammas S, Kerner JA Jr: Establishing a nutrition support team at a children’s hospital in the current era of fixed reimbursement. Journal of Investigative Medicine 44:195A, 1996.
    • 45. Lundergan F, Shepard E, Kerner JA Jr: A survey of pediatric parenteral nutrition practices. Twentieth Clinical Congress Program Manual (ASPEN 1996) – presented as a poster.46. Andolina-Fisher A, Poole RL, Machie R, Tsang C, Baugh N, Utley K, Kerner JA Jr: A clinical pathway for pediatric parenteral nutrition. J Am Coll Nutr 15:552, 1996 (presented as a poster at the annual meeting of the American College of Nutrition).47. Porcelli P, Schanler R, Greer F, Chan G, Gross S, Mehta N, Spear M, Kerner J, Flores L, Terry D, Minervini G, Euler A: A new human milk fortifier (HMF): a multicenter report. Pediatric Research 40:548, 1996 (presented as a poster at the European Society for Pediatric Research meeting in 1996).48. Andolina-Fisher A, Poole RL, Machie R, Tsang C, Baugh N, Utley K, Kerner JA Jr: A clinical pathway for pediatric parenteral nutrition. 21st Clinical Congress Program Manual (ASPEN 1997), p. 454 (presented as a poster).49. Fisher A, Faye K, Poole R, Anderson P, Keck S, Baugh N, Kerner J: Triglyceride levels in infants and children receiving parenteral nutrition, 24th Clinical Congress Program Book, 2000; p.78. (presented as a poster).50. Fisher A, Faye K, Poole R, Anderson P, Keck S, Baugh N, Kerner J Jr: Triglyceride levels in infants and children receiving parenteral nutrition. Nutrition in Clinical Practice 15:S14-S15, 2000.51. Kerner JA, Millan M, Garcia M, Pratt CA, Higgins J, Skarsgard E, Esquivel CO: Development of hepatic adenoma in a 14 year old with microvillus inclusion disease (MID) on lifelong TPN. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 31 (Supplement 2): S41, 2000 (presented as a poster at the World Congress of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Boston, Mass., August 2000).52. Pratt CA, Garcia MG, Kerner JA: Siblings with microvillus inclusion disease thriving nine and 14 years after diagnosis. Pediatric Intestinal Failure: Strategies and Controversies; Course Book, September 8-9, 2000, Childrens Hospital Pittsburgh (presented as a poster 9/9/2000).53. Baugh N, Fisher A, Flanagan G, Poole R, Kerner J: Nutritional support challenge: a mother with Crohns disease (CD), triplet pregnancy, and small bowel obstruction (SBO). 25th Clinical Congress Manual (ASPEN 2001), p. 76-77 (presented as a poster).54. Baugh N, Fisher A, Flanagan G, Poole R, Kerner J: Nutritional Support Challenges: a mother with Crohns disease (CD), triplet pregnancy, and small bowel obstruction (SBO). Nutrition in Clinical Practice 16:115, 2001.55. Baier-Andrew L, Nishioka F, Kerner J, Wilder G: A new model for monitoring pediatric home infusion patients. Presented as a poster at the 10th Annual PPAG Conference, St. Louis, MO, 10/91. Published: J Pediatr Pharmacol Ther. 6:368-369, 2001.56. Wilder GL, Nishioka FY, Kerner JA, Poole RL, Dickerson EG: Integration of ORYX and performance improvement. Presented as a poster at the 36th Annual ASHP (American Society for Hospital Pharmacists) Meeting, New Orleans, Dec 3, 2001.57. Fisher AA, Deffenbaugh CA, Poole RL, Garcia M, Kerner JA: Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (Alteplase) for restoring patency to occluded central venous access devices in infants and children. Presented as a poster at the INS (Infusion Nurses Society) meeting, Phoenix, AZ, May 7, 2002.58. Stringer J, Moreno E, Kerner JA. An Integrated Web-Based Nutrition Curriculum. Presented at the Nutrition Academic Award Program 2002 Annual Meeting.59. Fischer M, Stringer J, Moreno E, Kerner JA: Program Evaluation Results for Peds 207-Nutrition Principles. Presented at the Nutrition Academic Award Program 2002 Annual Meeting.60. Fischer M, Stringer J, Moreno E, Kerner JA: Program Evaluation of a Required Longitudinal Online Nutrition Course for Medical Students. Poster session presented at the Western Group on Education Affairs Annual Meeting, Spring 2002.61. Stringer J, Moreno E, Kerner JA. Required Online Clinical Nutrition Course. Poster session presented at the 113th Annual Meeting of the Association of American Medical Colleges, November 2002.62. Hurwitz M, Garcia MG, Kerner JA Jr: Copper deficiency during TPN: a report of four cases. Nutrition Week 2003 Program Booklet, p.106 (presented as a poster at Nutrition Week, San Antonio, Texas, 2003), and Nutrition in Clinical Practice 18(2):185, 2003.
    • 63. Moghadam S, Mullin R, Kerner JA, Stringer J, Porter E: Cummulative evaluation of an on-line nutrition course. Poster session – presented at the Western Group on Educational Affairs Annual Meeting, Spring 2003.64. Kerner J Jr, Garcia M., Riley M, and Berquist W: Hemangioendothelioma of the liver presenting as fulminant hepatic failure in an infant. Presented as a “clinical vignette” poster, NASPGHAN Annual Meeting, October 2003.65. Fridge JL, Kerner J, Cox K: The specific carbohydrate diet – a treatment for Crohn’s Disease: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 39, Suppl. 1, p. S299-S300, 2004 (June issue) and presented as a poster at the 2nd World Congress of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Paris, France, July 2004.66. Poole RL, Rey LL, Hintz SR, Mackenzie NI, Kerner JA Jr. Aluminum exposure from parenteral nutrition: meeting the new FDA regulation. Clinical Nutrition Week A.S.P.E.N. National Meeting, Dallas, Texas, February 14, 2006. Program Syllabus, Clinical Nutrition Week, Volume 2, pg. 635.67. Poole RL, Hintz SR, Mackenzie NI, Kerner John A Jr: Aluminum exposure in neonates from parenteral nutrition. Pediatric Academic Societies’ 2006 Annual Meeting, April 29, 2006; Program Syllabus, p. 64.Revised 10/06 Appendix B
    • CURRICULUM VITAE CV should be condensed to fit this page. Do not add additional pages except as directed below.Append bibliography for the past FIVE YEARS ONLY, limited to articles published or in press and abstracts presented. Name: Dorsey Machir Bass, MD Position: Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology) Address: Stanford University-Pediatric GI, 750 Welch Road #116, Palo Alto, CA 94304 Professional education (including dates and degrees obtained): University of Missouri, Columbia, MO (Magna Cum Laude) 1975, BA Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN 1979, MD Hospital training (including dates of internships, residencies, fellowships, etc.) Clinical and Research Fellow, Combined Program in Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Childrens Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, l983-86 Research Fellow, Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 1984-87 Research Fellow in Medicine, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston, MA, 1984-86 Research Fellow in Gastroenterology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 1987-90 Current professional appointments: Stanford University School of Medicine: Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology) Primary certification (including date): General Pediatrics, 1987 Subspecialty certification (including date): Pediatric Gastroenterology, 1995 Recertification (including date): Pediatrics Gastroenterology, 2003 Professional activities/committees: Sedation Committee, Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital , 2001 - Present Associate Editor, Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 2006-11
    • Bibliography – Dorsey M. Bass, MDPeer-reviewed ArticlesRodriguez-Baez N, O’Brien R, Qiu S-Q, and Bass DM. Astrovirus, adenovirus, and rotavirus in hospitalized children: Prevalence andassociation with gastroenteritis. . J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2002 Jul;35(1):64-8.Bass DM, Prevo M, Waxman DS "Gastrointestinal safety of an extended-release, nondeformable, oral dosage form (OROS: aretrospective study." Drug Saf 2002; 25: 14: 1021-1033:Bass DM, Cordoba E, Dekker C, Schuind A, and C Cassady. Intestinal imaging of children with acute gastroenteritis. J Ped GI Nutr39:270-274, 2004.DiDomenico, P, Bass DM, Barry G, and Sarwal M. Non-cirrhotic portal hypertension and esophageal varices in association withnephropathic cystinosis: case presentation and review of the literature. Accepted Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease. 2004.Jaimes MC, Rojas OL, Kunkel EJ, Butcher EC, Bass DM, Angel J, Franco MA, and Greenberg HB. Maturation and trafficking markerson rotavirus-specific B cells circulating during acute infection and convalescence in children. J Virol, 78:10967-10976, 2004.Nguyen PC, Garcia-Careaga M, Bass D "Gastrointestinal bleeding." Clin Pediatr (Phila) 2005; 44: 7: 641-643.Book chapters, editorial and ivited monographsBass DM “Group A rotavirus” In: Infections of the Gastrointestinal Tract. M. Blaser and P. Smith (eds), Lippencott Williams andWilkens, Philadelphia, 20014. 859-878.Bass DM “Infectious Diarrhea in children: working group report of the first World congress of Pediatric Gastroenterology.” J PedGastroent and Nutr. 35:s143-150, 2002.Bass DM “Rotavirus” In: Antimicrobial Therapy and Vaccines. V. Yu (ed) Apple Trees Productions, New York (2002) 1405-1413.Bass DM and Greenberg HB “Enteric Adenovirus” In: Antimicrobial Therapy and Vaccines. V. Yu (ed) Apple trees Productions, NewYork (2002) 1139-1141.Bass DM and Greenberg HB “ Calicivirus” In: Antimicrobial Therapy and Vaccines. V. Yu (ed) Apple trees Productions, New York(2002)1143-1145Bass DM and Greenberg HB “Astrovirus” In: Antimicrobial Therapy and Vaccines. V. Yu (ed) Apple trees Productions, New York(2002) 1141-1143Bass DM “Rotavirus and other agents of viral gastroenteritis” In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 17th ed Behrman, Kliegman, and Arvin(eds), W.B. Saunders, Philadelphia. (2004) 1081-1084Bass DM “Treatment of viral gastroenteritis” In: Viral Gastroenteritis. U Desselberger and J gray (eds). Elsevier Science B.V. 2002 93-104.Bass DM “Viral gastroenteritis: In: Pediatric Gastrointestinal Disease. Allen Walker (ed). B.C. Decker Hamilton Ontario , (2004)Fridge J and Bass DM “Parasites” In: Pediatric Gastrointestinal Disease. R. Wyllie and JS Hyam (eds). W. B. Saunders, Philadelphia(In Press 2004)Bass DM Case definition of intussception: use and misuse. Ecitorial JPGN (In Progress 2004)Riley M and Bass DM “Infectious Diarrhea” In: Pediatric Gastroenterology: The Requisites.C Licouris (ed) WB Saunders (In press 2005)Bass DM “Astroviruses” In: The mucosal Immune System. S Tyring (ed). (In press 2005)AbstractsBass DM, Rodriguez N. Viral enteritis prevalence in children’s hospital. American Society for Virology annual meeting.Madison, WI July 13, 2001.Bass DM, Cordoba E, Dekker C, and Cassady, C. Intestinal imaging of children with acute rotavirus gastroenteritis. Presented atworkshop on intussusception, rotavirus and oral vaccines. Arlington, VA September 5-7, 2001.
    • Bass DM and Qiu S-Q. Astrovirus proteolytic processing by cellular proteases. American Society for Virology annual meeting .Lexington Ky. July 13, 2001.Fridge J and Bass DM Neonatal military tuberculosis presenting as malignant ascites. NASPGHAN. Nov 17, 2003; Toronto Canada
    • Appendix B CURRICULUM VITAE CV should be condensed to fit this page. Do not add additional pages except as directed below.Append bibliography for the past FIVE YEARS ONLY, limited to articles published or in press and abstracts presented. Name: William Eric Berquist, M.D. Position: Associate Professor, Pediatric GI, Hepatology and Nutrition Department of Pediatrics Stanford University Medical Center & Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, Stanford, CA Address: 750 Welch Rd. #116, Palo Alto, CA 94304 Professional education (including dates and degrees obtained): 1967-71Vanderbilt University; B.A. 1971-75 Northwestern University, M.D. Hospital training (including dates of internships, residencies, fellowships, etc.) 1975-76 U.C.L.A. Center for Health Sciences, Internship in Pediatrics; 1976-78 U.C.L.A. Center for Health Sciences, Residency in Pediatrics; 1978-80 U.C.L.A. Center for Health Sciences, Fellowship in Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Current professional appointments: 7/1/96-Present Associate Professor of Pediatrics, MCL, Stanford University School of Medicine 1998-present Medical Director, Pediatric Liver Transplant Service, LPCH, Stanford, CA Primary certification (including date): American Academy of Pediatrics, General Pediatrics; Dec. 7, 1980; No. 25227 Subspecialty certification (including date): American Board of Pediatrics, Subspecialty in Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, January 22, 1991, No. 040337 Recertification (including date): American Board of Pediatrics, General Pediatrics and Subspeciality in Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Clinical Nutrition, re-certification March 27, 2004., No. 0032 Professional activities/committees: Chair, Health Information Management Committee; Medical Directory, Ambulatory Procedure Unit, Chair of the Physician Well-Being Committee
    • Articles Published:Zajicek A, Esquivel C, Millan M, Cox K, Berquist R, and Berquist W. Thirteen Years’ Experience in Pediatric Liver Transplantation:Differences Between Tacrolimus and Cyclosporine. Transplantation Proceedings Vol 34, No. 5:1976-78, August 2002.Millan MT, Berquist WE, So SK, Sarwal MM, Wayman KI, Cox KL, Filler G, Salvatierra O Jr, Esquivel CO. One hundred percent patientand kidney allograft survival with simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation in infants with primary hyperoxaluria: a single-centerexperience. Transplantation. 76(10):1458-63; Nov 27, 2003.Hurwitz M, Desai DM, Cox KL, Berquist WE, Esquivel CO, Millan MT. Complete immunosuppressive withdrawal as a uniform approachto post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric liver transplantation. Pediatr Transplant. 8:267-72, 2004.George TI, Jeng M, Berquist W, Cherry AM, Link MP, Arber DA. Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma arising after LiverTransplantation: Case Report and Review of the Literature. Pediatric Blood and Cancer 44(3):270-6, 2005.Berquist RK, Berquist WE, Esquivel CO, Cox KL, Wayman KI, Litt IF. Adolescent Non-Adherence: Prevalence and Consequences in LiverTransplant Recipients. Pediatr Transplant 10(3):304-10, 2006.Riley MR, Garcia MG, Cox KL, Berquist WE, Kerner JA Jr. Hepatic infantile hemangioendothelioma with unusual manifestations. JPediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 42(1):109-13, 2006. Erratum in: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2006 Mar;42(3):341. Burtelow, Matthew[corrected to Riley, Matthew R]; Garcia, Manuel [corrected to Garcia, Manuel G]; Lucile, S [removed]; Cox, Kenneth [corrected to Cox,Kenneth L]; Berquist, William [corrected to Berquist, William E]; Kemer, John Jr [corrected to Kerner, John A Jr].Wu P, Kerner J, Berquist W. Parenteral Nutrition Related Cholestasis Related to Parental Care. Nutr Clin Pract 21(3):291-5, 2006.Castillo RO, Zarge R, Cox K, Strichartz D, Berquist W, Bonham CA, Esquivel CO. Pediatric Intestinal Transplantation at PackardChildren’s Hospital/Stanford University Medical Center: Report of a Four-Year Experience. Transplant Proc 38(6):1716-7, 2006.AbstractsZajicek A, Cox K, Castillo R, Millan M, Esquivel C, Berquist WE. Chronic rejection in pediatric post-liver transplant patients: acuterejection predisposition. Poster presented at the Second International Congress on Immunosuppression, San Diego, CA, December,2001.Schultz LM, Berquist W, SheehanMG. Calorie Requirement at Ketogenic Diet Initiation. Presented at Annual Meeting of AmericanEpilepsy Society, Seattle, WA., December 6-11, 2002.Desai DM, Millan MT, O’Hali WA, Zajicek A, Monge HL, Cox KL, Castillo R, Berquist WE, Esquivel CO. Influence of race on outcomesin pediatric liver transplantation. American Journal of Transplantation Supplement 3, 2:295, 2002.Millan MT, Berquist WE, So SK, Sarwal MM, Wayman KI, Cox KL, Filler G, Salvatierra O Jr., Esquivel CO. 100% patient and kidney allograftsurvival with simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation in infants with primary hyperoxaluria – a single center experience. Transplantation76:1458-1463, 2003.Rebecca Berquist, BS, Karen I. Wayman, PhD, Kenneth L Cox, MD, Carlos O. Esquivel, MD and William Berquist, MD . Increased rejectionepisodes in non-compliant adolescents after liver transplantation. Presented at the 2nd Congress of the International Pediatric TransplantAssociation, Rio de Janeiro, April 5-9, 2003.Millan MT, Berquist WE, So SK, Sarwal MM, Wayman KI, Cox KL, Filler G, Salvatierra O Jr., Esquivel CO. One hundred percent patient andkidney allograft survival with simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation in infants with primary hyperoxaluria: a single-center experience.Transplantation Vol 76:1458-1463, No. 10, Nov. 27, 2003.Berquist WE, Zajicek A, Berquist R, Cox K, Millan M, Esquivel CO. Experience in pediatric liver transplantation over thirteen years: differencesbetween tacrolimus and cyclosporine. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:73; 2003.Cox KL, Wayman KI, Berquist WE, Castillo R, Esquivel CO. A descriptive analysis of a pediatric liver transplant outreach model of patient careat Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:111, 2003.Riley MR, Cox KL, Castillo RO, and Berquist WE. Pediatric End-Stage Liver Disease Score: Incomplete measure of need for liver transplant.JPGN 37:384, 2003. Presented at NASPGHAN, Montreal, October 2003.Kerner J, Garcia M, Berquist W. Hemangioendothelioma of the liver presenting as fulminant hepatic failure in an infant. North AmericanSociety of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Annual Meeting, Montreal, Canada, 2003
    • Berquist RK, Wayman KI, Cox KL, Esquivel CO, Berquist WE. Increased rejection episodes in non-compliant adolescents after livertransplantation. Pediatric Transplantation Supplement. Supplement 4:124, April 2003.Hurwitz, M, Desai DM, Cox KL, Berquist WE, Esquivel CO, Millan MT. Complete immunosuppressive withdrawal as a uniform approach topost-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric liver transplantation. Pediatric Transplantation 8:267-272, 2004.Berquist RK, Litt I, Cox KL, Esquivel CO, Wayman KI, Berquist WE. Prevalence, demographic variables and adverse outcomes associatedwith non-adherence to immunosuppressive therapy in adolescent liver transplant recipients. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition.39 Supplement 1:S145, June 2004.Riley MR, Berquist WE, Bass NM, Merriman RB, Rosenthal P. Failure to diagnose obesity and screen for fatty liver disease in pediatricpractice. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition, Supplement 1:S464, June 2004.Berquist RK, Berquist WE, Esquivel CO, Cox KL, Wayman KL, Litt IF. Prevalence, demographic variables and adverse outcomes associatedwith n on-adherence to immunosuppressiver therapy in adolescent liver transplant recipients. Presented at Twenty-First Annual StanfordMedical Student Research Symposium. May 6, 2004.Berquist RK, Berquist WE, Litt I. Severe Adverse Consequences of Non-Adherence in Adolescent Liver Transplant Patients. PosterPresentation, NASPGHAN 2005 Annual Meeting, Salt Lake City, UT. Oct. 21, 2005.Castillo RO, Zarge R, Cox KL, Strichartz D, Berquist WE, Hurwitz M, Bonham CA, Esquivel CO. Pediatric intestinal transplantation at StanfordUniversity/Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital (SU/LPCH). Poster presented at IX International Small Bowel Transplantation Symposium, June30 – July 2, 2005. Brussels, Belgium.Stevenson TN, Enns G, Berquist W, Wayman K, Sarwal M, Esquivel CO, Millan MT. Long-Term Outcome Following Pediatric LvierTransplantation for Metabolic Disorders. Poster presented at World Transplant Congress, July 26, 2006, Boston, MA.Berquist RK, Berquist WE, Litt IF. Transition from Pediatric to Adult Care in Liver Transplant Recipients. Poster presented at WorldTransplant Congress, July 27, 2006, Boston MA.Nguyen C, Wong W, Merker J, Berquist W, Fontaine M, Glader B. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Pediatric Liver Transplant Patientson FK506. Poster presented at the World Transplant Congress, July 27, 2006, Boston MA.Berquist RK, Berquist WE, Litt IF. Patient Variables and Adverse Outcomes Associated with Non-Adherence in Adolescent LiverTransplant Patients. Oral presentation at the World Transplant Congress, July 26, 2006, Boston MA.
    • Appendix B CURRICULUM VITAE CV should be condensed to fit this page. Do not add additional pages except as directed below.Append bibliography for the past FIVE YEARS ONLY, limited to articles published or in press and abstracts presented. Name Ricardo O. Castillo, M.D. Position: Associate Professor of Pediatrics Address: 750 Welch Rd, Suite 116, Palo Alto CA 94304 Professional education (including dates and degrees obtained): 1966 - 1970 Stanford University, Stanford, CA B.S. Biology 1970 - 1975 University of California, San Diego M.D. Medicine 1973 - 1974 University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health M.P.H. Nutrition Hospital training (including dates of internships, residencies, fellowships, etc.) 1975 - 1976 Internship: Pediatrics University of California, San Francisco San Francisco General Hospital 1976 - 1978 Residency: Pediatrics Stanford University Medical Center 1980 - 1982 NIH Postdoctoral Fellowship Pediatric Gastroenterology and Liver Disease Department of Pediatrics University of California, San Francisco Current professional appointments: 1999 - Associate Professor of Pediatrics Stanford University School of Medicine Medical Director, Pediatric Small Intestinal Transplant Program Packard Childrens Hospital at Stanford Primary certification (including date): American Board of Pediatrics 1981 Subspecialty certification (including date): American board of Pediatrics – Pediatric Gastroenterology - 1995 Recertification (including date): Professional activities/committees: 1989 Department of Pediatrics Faculty Practice Plan Committee 1989 Department of Pediatrics Space Allocation Committee 1989 Reviewer, American Journal of Physiology 1990 Reviewer, Pediatric Research 1990 Reviewer, Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 1991 Reviewer, Pediatrics 1991 Liver Transplant Task Force, Stanford University Hospital 1992 American Gastroenterological Association Task Force on Minority Participation 1992 Reviewer, Biology of the Neonate 2000 Member, Standing Committee on Medical School Admissions Stanford University School of Medicine 2003 Reviewer, American journal of Transplantation
    • Bibliography – Ricardo O. Castillo, MDDurant, M., Gargosky, S., Dahlstrom, K.A., Fang, F., Hellman, B.H., and R. O. Castillo.Role of Growth Hormone in Intestinal Adaptation to Massive Small Bowel Resection.Pediatric Research 49: 189-196, 2001Castillo, R.O., Davies, Y.K., Lin, Y-C, Garcia, M., and H. Young.Management of Esophageal Strictures in Children with Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 34:535-541, 2002Castillo, R.O., Zarge, R., Cox, K., Berwquist, W., Bonham, C.A,, Esquivel, C.O.Pediatric Intestinal Transplantation at Packard Children’s Hospital/Stanford University Medical Center: Report of a Four Year Experience.Transplantation Proceedings 38:1716-1717, 2006GrantsEndotoxemia in Orthotopic Liver Transplantation and Small Bowel Transplantation - An Observational Study to Evaluate Levels ofEndotoxin Activity ASSAY (EAA) in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Liver Transplant or Small Bowel Transplant.PI: Ricardo O. Castillo, M.D.Sponsor: Spectral Diagnostics, Inc.Period: 02/24/06 – 02/23/07Funding: $20,375PENDING:Adenovirus in Pediatric Intestinal Transplant Recipients – A Prospective StudyPI: Ricardo O. Castillo, M.D.Sponsor: NIHPeriod: 04/01/2007 – 03/31/2009Funding: $429,000
    • Appendix B CURRICULUM VITAE CV should be condensed to fit this page. Do not add additional pages except as directed below.Append bibliography for the past FIVE YEARS ONLY, limited to articles published or in press and abstracts presented. Name: Kenneth L. Cox, M.D. Position: Division Chief, Pediatric GI, Hepatology & Nutrition/Chief Medical Officer, Packard Children’s Hospital Address: 750 Welch Road, Suite 116, Palo Alto, CA 94304 Professional education (including dates and degrees obtained): B.S., 1964-1968, Seattle University, Seattle Washington M.D., 1968-1971, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington Hospital training (including dates of internships, residencies, fellowships, etc.) Intern, 1971-1972, University of Oregon, Portland, Oregon Resident, Pediatrics, 1972-1974, University of Oregon, Portland, Oregon Fellow, Pediatric GI & Nutrition, 1976-1978, Dept. of Pediatrics, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA Current professional appointments: Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California Primary certification (including date): 1972, National Board of Medical Examiners, No. 128508 1977, American Board of Pediatrics, No. 20192/ & 1997 American Board of Pediatrics, recertified 1997 Subspecialty certification (including date): 1990, Sub-Board of Pediatric Gastroenterology, 11/2/90, No. 060 Recertification (including date): 1997, Sub-Board of Pediatric Gastroenterology,, No. 0060 2005-2011, Sub-Board of Pediatric Gastroenterology, No. 0060 Professional activities/committees: 1995-present: Medical Board, Director of Outreach Programs, Interdisciplinary Committee, 1997-present: Board of Directors, Quality Assurance Committee, Ambulatory Care Committee, Co-Chair-Physician Practice Management Committee 2000-present: Co-Chair, Budget and Operations Committee, Management Committee
    • PUBLICATIONS of the last 5 years – Kenneth L. Cox, M.D.Zajicek A, Esquivel C, Millan M, Cox K, Berquist R, and Berquist W. Thirteen years’ experience in pediatric liver transplantation: differencesbetween tacrolimus and cyclosporine. Transplantation Proceedings, 34, No. 5:1976-78, 2002.Falco DA, Nepomuceno RR, Krams SM, Lee PP, Davis MM, Salvatierra O, Alexander SR, Esquivel CO, Cox KL, Frankel LR, Martinez OM.Identification of Epstein-Barr virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes in the circulation of pediatric transplant recipients. Transplantation 74, 501-510,No. 4, August 27, 2002.Millan MT, Berquist WE, So SK, Sarwal MM, Wayman KI, Cox KL, Filler G, Salvatierra O Jr., Esquivel CO. 100% patient and kidney allograftsurvival with simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation in infants with primary hyperoxaluria – a single center experience. Transplantation76:1458-1463, No. 10, November 27, 2003.Davies YK, Cox KM, Abdullah BA, Terry AB, Cox KL. Oral Vancomycin: Treatment of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis in Children. JPGN,2005; 37:345-346.Hurwitz M, Desai DM, Cox KL, Berquist WE, Esquivel CO, Millan MT. Complete immunosuppressive withdrawal as a uniform approach topost-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric liver transplantation. Pediatr Transplantation 8:267-72; 2004.Castillo RO, Zarge R, Cox K, Strichartz D, Berquist W, Bonham CA, Esquivel CO. Pediatric Intestinal Transplantation at Packard Children’sHospital/Stanford University Medical Center: Report of a Four Year Experience. Transplantation Proc 38:1716-17, 2006.Sharek PJ, Wayman K, Lin E, Strichartz D, Sentivany-Collins S, Good J, Esquivel C, Brown M, Cox K. Improved pain management in pediatricpostoperative liver transplant patients using parental education and non-pharmacologic interventions. Pediatr Transplantation 2006: 10:172-77.Blackwell Munksgaard. 2006.Berquist RK, Berquist WE, Esquivel CO, Cox KL, Wayman KI, Litt IF. Adolescent non-adherence: Prevalence and consequences in livertransplant recipients. Pediatr Transplant 2006; 10:304-10.Riley MR, Burtelow M, Garcia MG, Garcia M, Lucile S, Cox KL, Cox K, Berquist WE, Berquist W, Kerner JA, Kerner J. Hepatic infantilehemangioendothelioma with unusual manifestations. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2006. 42: 1:109-13.Burtelow M, Garcia M, Lucile S. Cox K, Berquist W, Kerner J. “Hepatic Infantile Hemangioendothelioma with Unusual Manifestations,” JPediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 2006; 42: 1:109-113.ABSTRACTS of the last 5 years – Kenneth L. Cox, M.D.Desai DM, Millan MT, O’Hali WA, Zajicek A, Monge HL, Cox KL, Castillo R, Berquist WE, Esquivel CO.Influence of race on outcomes in pediatric liver transplantation. Presented, American Transplant Congress, April 26-May 1, 2002, Washington,DC.Wayman KI, Esquivel CO, Cox KL. A comparison of the developmental outcome of children with biliaryatresia transplanted birth to 7 months of age with children transplanted 8 to 15 months of age. Presented, NASPGHAN Annual Meeting, SanAntonio, TX, October 2002.Desai DM, Millan MT, O’Hali WA, Zajicek A, Monge HL, Cox KL, Castillo R, Berquist WE, Esquivel CO. Influence of race on outcomes inpediatric liver transplantation. American Journal of Transplantation Supplement 3, 2:295; 2002.Wayman KI, Esquivel CO, Cox KL. A comparison of the developmental outcome of children with biliaryatresia transplanted birth to 7 months of age with children transplanted 8 to 15 months of age. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:125; 2003.Cox KL, Wayman KI, Berquist WE, Castillo RO, Esquivel CO. A descriptive analysis of a pediatric livertransplant outreach model of patient care at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:111, 2003.Berquist WE, Zajicek A, Berquist R, Cox K, Millan M, Esquivel CO. Experience in pediatric liver transplantation over thirteen years: differencesbetween tacrolimus and cyclosporine. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:73; 2003.Hurwitz M, Desai DM, Cox KL, Esquivel CO, Millan MT. Complete immunosuppressive drug withdrawal as a uniform approach to post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric liver transplantation. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:76; 2003.Hurwitz M, Desai DM, Cox KL, Esquivel CO, Millan MT. Complete immunosuppressive drug withdrawal as a uniform approach to post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric liver transplantation. American Journal of Transplantation Supplement 5, 3:306; 2003.Wayman KI, Esquivel CO, Cox KL. A comparison of IQ scores and school performance of children with biliary atresia 6, 8, and 10 yearsfollowing extrahepatic liver transplantation. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:110; 2003.
    • Berquist R, Wayman KI, Cox KL, Esquivel CO. Increased rejection episodes in non-compliant adolescents after liver transplantation. PediatricTransplantation 7-Suppl 4:124; 2003.Davies YK, Cox KL, Abdullah BA, Terry AB, Cox KL. Oral Vancomycin: Treatment of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis in Children.JPGN:37:345-346, 2003.Riley MR, Cox KL, Castillo RO, and Berquist WE. Pediatric end-stage liver disease score: incomplete measure of need for liver transplant.JPGN 37:384, 2003. Presented at NASPGHAN, Montreal, October 2003.Millan MT, Berquist WE, So SK, Sarwal NM, Wayman KI, Cox KL, Salvatierra O Jr., Esquivel CO. One hundred percent patient and kidneyallograft survival with simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation in infants with primary hyperoxaluria: a single-center experience.Transplantation 76(10), Nov. 27, 2003.Hurwitz, M, Desai DM, Cox KL, Berquist WE, Esquivel CO, Millan MT. Complete immunosuppressive withdrawal as a uniform approach topost-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric liver transplantation. Pediatric Transplantation 8:267-272, 2004.Berquist RK, Berquist WE, Esquivel CO, Cox KL, Wayman KI, Litt IF. Prevalence, demographic variables and adverse outcomes associatedwith n on-adherence to immunosuppressive therapy in adolescent liver transplant recipients. Presented at Twenty-First Annual StanfordMedical Student Research Symposium. May 6, 2004.Castillo RO, Zarge R, Cox KL, Strichartz D, Berquist WE, Hurwitz M, Bonham CA. Esquivel CO. Pediatric intestinal transplantation at StanfordUniversity/Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital (SU/LPCH). Poster presented at IX International Small Bowel Transplantation Symposium, June30-July 2, 2005, Brussels, Belgium.Nguyen C, Stenard F, Cox K, Umetsu D, Esquivel C, Martinez O. Circulating regulatory T-cells (CD4+CD25+FOXP3+) inversely correlate withacute rejection and inflammation in pediatric liver transplant patients. World Transplant Congress, July 22-27, 2006.Beaunoyer M, Vanatta J, Ogihara M, Strichartz D, Cox K, Esquivel CO. The Milan Criteria do not apply to children with hepatocellularcarcinoma (HCC). World Transplant Congress, July 22-27, 2006.CHAPTERS – Kenneth L. Cox, M.D.Cox KL. Liver Transplantation. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 17th edition, 2004. Chapter 349, p. 1349-1350. thHurwitz M, Cox KL. Liver Transplantation. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 18 edition, 2005. Chapter 349.
    • Appendix B CURRICULUM VITAE CV should be condensed to fit this page. Do not add additional pages except as directed below.Append bibliography for the past FIVE YEARS ONLY, limited to articles published or in press and abstracts presented. Name: Manuel Garcia Position: Clinical Professor Address: 750 Welch Road Suite 116, Palo Alto, CA 94304 Professional education (including dates and degrees obtained): 1979 - 1983 Medical Doctorate University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine Hospital training (including dates of internships, residencies, fellowships, etc.) 1983 - 1984 Internship - Pediatrics University Pediatric Hospital 1984 - 1986 Residency - Pediatrics University Pediatric Hospital University of Puerto Rico 1986 - 1988 Chief Resident - Pediatrics University Pediatric Hospital University of Puerto Rico 1988 - 1991 Fellowship - Pediatric Gastroenterology Stanford University Medical Center Current professional appointments: 2005- present Professor Clinical Educator Line Department of Pediatrics Stanford School of Medicne 1. Primary certification (including date): 2003 Diplomate of the American Board of Pediatrics #055946, Expiration 2009 Subspecialty certification (including date): 2001 Sub-board of Pediatric Gastroenterology #680 Expiration 2008 Professional activities/committees: Nutrition Support Team. Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. 1999 to present. Pediatric Residency Review Committee. Advisor
    • BIBLIOGRAPHYPratt CA, Garcia MG, Poole RL, Kerner JA: Life-long TPN vs intestinal transplantation in children with microvillous inclusion disease.Journal of Pediatric Pharmacology and therapeutics 6:498-503, 2001Pratt CA, Garcia MG, Poole RL, Kerner JA Jr: Nutritional management of neonatal and infant liver disease.Neo Reviews 2001 2: e215-222.Castillo RO, Davies YK, Garcia M: Balloon dilatation of esophageal strictures in children with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition: 34:535-541, 2002Richard J. Shaw, Manuel Garcia, Marianna Thorn, Courtney Farley, Gretchen Flannagan. Treatment of feeding disorders in children withDown Syndrome. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry Vol. 8(1): 105-117; 2003Longhurst C, Naumovski L, Garcia-Careaga M, Kerner J. A practical guideline for calculating parenteral nutrition cycles. Nutrition in Clinical Practice 18:517-520, December 2003rAndolina A, Deffenbaugh C, Poole R, Garcia M, Kerner J. The use of Altaplase for restoring patency to occluded central venous accessdevices in infants and children. Journal of Infusion Nursing. Vol 27;171-174, May/June 2004Hurwitz M, Garcia M, Poole R, Kerner JA. Copper deficiency during parenteral nutrition:A report of four pediatric cases. Nutrition in Clinical Practice 19:305-308, 2004.Nagarajan S, Friederich T, Garcia M, Sarwal M. Gastrointestinal leukocytoclastic vasculitis:An adverse effect of sirolimus. Pediatr Transplant. 2005 Feb 9; 25(10):2490-503Kerner JA Jr., Garcia-Careaga M. Treatment of catheter occlusion in pediatric patients.J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2006 Jan-Feb; 30(1 Suppl):S73-81Garcia-Careaga M, Kerner JA Jr. Gastrointestinal manifestations of food allergies in pediatric patients. Nutr Clin Pract. 2005 Oct;20(5):526-35rPhuong Christine Nguyen, M.D., Manuel Garcia-Careaga, M.D., Dorsey Bass, M.D.Uncooked Pasta: An Unusual Case of Gastrointestinal Bleeding. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2005 Sep;44(7):641-3.Matthew R. Riley, M.D., Matthew Burtelow, M.D. PhD., Manuel Garcia, M.D., Kenneth Cox, M.D., William Berquist, M.D., John KernerJr., M.D. Unusual Presentation of Hepatic Infantile Hemangioendothelioma. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2006 Jan; 42(1):109-13CHAPTERSGarcia-Careaga M, Kerner JA, Malabsorption, in Behrman RE (Ed), Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 17th Edition, pgs. 1257-1272, 2004.Garcia-Careaga M, Kerner JA, Munchausen Syndrome By Proxy in Goldworth A, Frankel L (Eds.), Ethics in Pediatrics. Cambridge University Press. Pgs 55-67, 2005Garcia-Careaga M, Castillo RO, Kerner JA Jr., Intestinal Transplantation, in Ethics inPediatrics. Edited by Ammon Goldworth, Ph.D. Lorry R. Frankel, M.D., Cambridge University Press. Pgs 190-195, 2005ABSTRACTSAmy Andolina Fisher, RN, MS, CNSN, Claudia A. Deffenbaugh, PharmD, Robert L. Poole, PharmD, Manuel Garcia, MD, John A Kerner,MD. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (Alteplase) for restoring patency to occluded central venous access devices in infant andchildren. Infusion Nurses Society. 2002 Annual Meeting. May 4 – 9, 2002. Phoenix, ArizonaMelissa Hurwitz MD, Manuel Garcia MD, John A. Kerner MD. Copper deficiency During TPN: A Report of Four Pediatric Cases.Accepted abstract to be presented at the 2nd AnnualNutrition Week on January 21, 2003Kerner J Jr, Garcia M, Riley M, and Berquist W. Hemangioendothelioma of the liverpresenting as fulminant hepatic failure in an infant. Presented as a “clinical vignette” poster,NASPGHAN Annual Meeting, October 2003.
    • Appendix B CURRICULUM VITAE CV should be condensed to fit this page. Do not add additional pages except as directed below.Append bibliography for the past FIVE YEARS ONLY, limited to articles published or in press and abstracts presented. Name MELISSA HURWITZ, MD Position: ASST PROFESSOR PEDIATRICS, PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY, HEPATOLOGY AND NUTRITION Address: 750 WELCH RD, STE #116, PALO ALTO, CA 94304 Professional education (including dates and degrees obtained): 1988-1992 UCLA, B.A. in Psychology, Cum Laude 1993-1997 TUFTS, M.D. Hospital training (including dates of internships, residencies, fellowships, etc.) 1997-1998 UCLA Intern, Pediatrics 1998-2000 UCLA Residency, Pediatrics 2001-2004 Stanford, Fellowship, Pediatric GI, Hepatology, and Nutrition Current professional appointments: 2004-present: Asst Professor, Pediatrics LPCH, Division of Pediatric GI, Hepatology and Nutrition Primary certification (including date): General Pediatrics, 10/24/2000 Subspecialty certification (including date): Board eligible Pediatric Gastroenterology Recertification (including date): Professional activities/committees: Member American Society of Transplantation, Member International Pediatric Transplant Assoc, Member NASGHAN, Member Medical Ethics Committee, Member Pediatric Transplant Subcommittee of Ethics Committee, Reviewer Pediatric Transplantation, Assoc Editor JPGN
    • PUBLICATIONSHurwitz M, Vargas J, Bahar R. The Evaluation of the Use of Botulinum Toxin in Children with Achalasia. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr.2000 May; 30(5): 509-14.Hurwitz M, Desai DM, Cox KL, Esquivel CO, Millan MT. Complete Immunosuppressive Drug Withdrawal as a Uniform Approach to Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disease in Pediatric Liver Transplantation. Pediatric Transplantation 2004 June: 8: 267-272.Hurwitz M, Garcia MG, Kerner JA. Copper Deficiency During Parenteral Nutrition: A Report of Four Pediatric Cases. Nutrition in ClinicalPractice. 2004 June; 19(3): 305-308.CHAPTERSHurwitz M, Berquist WE. Outras Alteracoes Pancreaticas. Gastroenterologia e Hepatologia em Pediatria, 2003. Chapter 25:329-331.Hurwitz M, Cox KL. Liver Transplantation. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 18th ed., 2005. Chapter 349.Hurwitz M, Kerner JA. Parenteral Nutrition. Nutrition in Pediatrics, 4th ed., 2006. Chapter 69.ABSTRACTS/POSTERSHurwitz M, Vargas J, Bahar R. The Evaluation of the Use of Botulinum Toxin in Children with Achalasia, poster. GI Clinical and OutcomesResearch Meeting, CURE: Digestive Diseases Research Center. Los Angeles, CA. October 1998.Hurwitz M, Garcia MG, Kerner JA. Copper Deficiency During TPN: A Report of Four Pediatric Cases, poster. A.S.P.E.N. Nutrition Week,San Antonio, Texas, January 2003.Hurwitz M, Desai DM, Cox KL, Esquivel CO, Millan MT. Complete Immunosuppressive Drug Withdrawal as a Uniform Approach to Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disease in Pediatric Liver Transplantation, poster. Second Congress of the International PediatricTransplant Association, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. April 2003.Riley M, Berquist W, Hurwitz M. Complications Following Liver Transplantation for Hepatoblastoma, poster. NASPGHAN Meeting.Salt Lake City, UT. October 2005.Riley M, Safta A, Hurwitz M. Ductus Venosus and Right Heart Failure: Liver Dysfunction and Hyperammonemia, poster. NASPGHANMeeting. Salt Lake City, UT. October 2005.Nguyen C, Hurwitz M. Management of Allergy after Tacrolimus-based Immunosuppression, poster. First International GastrointestinalEosinophilic Research Symposium. Orlando, FL. October 2006.Nguyen C, Hurwitz M. Management of Allergy after Tacrolimus-based Immunosuppression, poster. NASPGHAN Meeting.Orlando, FL. October 2006.PRESENTATIONS/TALKSHurwitz M, Desai DM, Cox KL, Esquivel CO, Millan MT. Complete Immunosuppressive Drug Withdrawal as a Uniform Approach toPost-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disease in Pediatric Liver Transplantation, oral presentation. American Transplant Congress,Washington D.C., May 2003.Autoimmune Hepatitis. Fellow and Resident Lecture series. LPCH, Stanford University October 2005.AWARDSJune 2004 Recipient, Outstanding Fellow of the Year, Lucile Salter Packard Children’s HospitalMay 2000 Recipient, Joseph W. St. Geme, Jr. Research Award for UCLA Pediatric ResidentsMay 2003 Recipient, Young Investigator Award for the American Transplant Congress
    • Appendix B CURRICULUM VITAE CV should be condensed to fit this page. Do not add additional pages except as directed below.Append bibliography for the past FIVE YEARS ONLY, limited to articles published or in press and abstracts presented. Name: Eric Sibley, MD, PhD Position: Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology) Address: Stanford University-Pediatric GI, 750 Welch Road #116, Palo Alto, CA 94304 Professional education (including dates and degrees obtained): Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1982-1990, M.D. Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1982-1990, Ph.D. Hospital training (including dates of internships, residencies, fellowships, etc.) Pediatrics Internship: Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, 1990-91 Pediatrics Residency: Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, 1991-93 Pediatric Gastroenterology Fellowship: Stanford University School of Medicine, 1993-96 Current professional appointments: Stanford University School of Medicine: Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology) Primary certification (including date): General Pediatrics, 1994 Subspecialty certification (including date): Pediatric Gastroenterology, 1997 Recertification (including date): General Pediatrics, 2002-2008 Pediatric Gastroenterology, 2005-2011 Professional activities/committees: NIH Clinical and Integrative Gastrointestinal Pathobiology (CGIP) Study Section, Permanent Member, 2004-07 Council, Society for Pediatric Research, 2005-08 Editor-In-Chief, Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 2006-11
    • Bibliography – Eric Sibley, MD, PhDMeng, S., Badrinarain, J., Sibley, E., Fang, R., and Hodin, R.A. Thyroid hormone and the D-type cyclins interact in regulating enterocytegene transcription. J Gastrointest Surg 2001; 5:49-55.Fang, R., Olds, L., Santiago, N.A. and Sibley, E. GATA-Family transcription factors activate the lactase gene promoter in intestinalepithelial cells. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 2001; 280:G58-67.Sibley, E., Milliken, J., Anand, S. and Doroshow, R. Subarachnoid hemorrhage and isolated atresia of the aortic arch. J Emerg Med 2002;22:179-83.Lee, S.Y., Wang, Z., Lin, C.K., Contag, C.H., Olds, L.C., Cooper, A.D. and Sibley, E. Regulation of intestine-specific spatiotemporalexpression by the rat lactase promoter. J Biol Chem 2002; 277:13099-105.Lee, S.Y., Madan, A., Furuta, G.T., Colgan, S.P. and Sibley, E. Lactase gene transcription is activated in response to hypoxia in intestinalepithelial cells. Mol Genet Metab 2002; 75:65-9.Sibley, E. Carbohydrate digestion and absorption. In: Encyclopedia of Gastroenterology, Leonard R. Johnson, editor. Academic Press:San Diego, CA. pp 275-8. 2003.Olds, L.C. and Sibley, E. Lactase persistence DNA variant enhances lactase promoter activity in vitro: functional role as a cis regulatoryelement. Hum Mol Genet 2003; 12:2333-40.Sibley, E. Carbohydrate intolerance. Curr Opin Gastroenterol 2004; 20:162-7.Sibley, E. Genetic variation and lactose intolerance: detection methods and clinical implications. Am J Pharmacogenomics 2004; 4:239-45.Chao, CK and Sibley, E. PCR-RFLP genotyping assay for a lactase persistence polymorphism in the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene.Genet Test 2004; 8:190-3.Wang, Z., Fang, R., Olds, L.C. and Sibley, E. Transcriptional regulation of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase promoter by PDX-1. Am JPhysiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 2004; 287:G555-61.Wong, R.J., DeSandre, G.H., Sibley, E., Stevenson, D.K. Neonatal jaundice and liver disease. Chapter 46. In: Neonatal-PerinatalMedicine, Fanaroff AA, Martin RJ, Walsh M editors, 8th Edition. Mosby, Elsevier Science: Philadelphia, PA. pp 1419-65. 2005Tang, S., Sambanis, A. and Sibley, E. Proteasome modulating agents induce rAAV2-mediated transgene expression in human intestinalepithelial cells. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2005; 331:1392-400.Sibley, E. Monosaccharide malabsorption. In: Encyclopedic Reference of Molecular Mechanisms of Disease, Florian Lang, editor.Springer: Berlin, Germany. In Press.Sibley, E. Sucrose intolerance. In: Encyclopedic Reference of Molecular Mechanisms of Disease, Florian Lang, editor. Springer: Berlin,Germany. In Press.Fang, R., Olds, L.C. and Sibley, E. Spatiotemporal patterns of intestine-specific transcription factor expression during postnatal mouse gutdevelopment. Gene Expr Patterns. 2006; 6:426-32.Sibley, E. Carbohydrate Assimilation. In: Textbook of Gastroenterology. Tadataka Yamada, David H. Alpers, Loren Laine, Neil Kaplowitz,Chung Owyang and Don W. Powell editors, 5th Edition. Submitted.Wang, Z., Maravelias, C. and Sibley, E. Lactase gene promoter fragments mediate differential spatial and temporal expression patterns intransgenic mice. DNA Cell Biol. 2006; 25:215-22.
    • Appendix B CURRICULUM VITAE CV should be condensed to fit this page. Do not add additional pages except as directed below.Append bibliography for the past FIVE YEARS ONLY, limited to articles published or in press and abstracts presented. Name: Carlos O. Esquivel, M.D., Ph.D. Position: Professor of Surgery and Chief, Division of Transplantation; Stanford University Medical Center Address: 750 Welch Road, Suite 319; Palo Alto, CA 94304 Professional education (including dates and degrees obtained): University of Costa Rica – 1969 – Pre-medicine University of Costa Rica – 1975 – M.D. University of Lund, Sweden – 1982 – Ph.D. Hospital training (including dates of internships, residencies, fellowships, etc.) Intern, University of Costa Rica – 1974; Resident, Pathology, VA Hospital, Martinez, CA - 1976-77 General Surgery Resident, University of California Medical Center, Davis, 1978-80; Research Fellow, University of Lund, Sweden 1980-1982; Chief Resident, UC Davis, 1983-84 Transplant Surgery Fellow, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA – 1984-85 Current professional appointments: The Arnold and Barbara Silverman Professorship in Pediatric Transplantation Chief, Division of Transplantation – Lucile Salter Packard Children’s Hospital and Stanford Hospital and Clinics Associate Director, Institute of Immunity, Transplantation and Infection, Stanford University Primary certification (including date): American Board of Surgery 11/07/1985 Subspecialty certification (including date): Added Qualifications in Surgical Critical Care 10/1989 Recertification (including date): American Board of Surgery recertification 1/1999 & 12/2003 Added Qualifications in Surgical Critical Care recertification 10/1999 Professional activities/committees: Member of numerous professional societies incl: American Surgical Association; American Society of Transplant Surgeons, American Society of Transplantation, The Transplantation Society, International Pediatric Transplant Association, Pacific Coast Surgical Association Reviewer: Archives of Surgery; Transplantation Proceedings, Liver Transplantation and Surgery and others Member at Large, Stanford Medical Board, Stanford Hospital and Clinics
    • Carlos O. Esquivel, M.D., Ph.D.Bibliography 2001-2006Peer-Review Articles PublishedOgura Y, Martinez OM, Villanueva JC, Tait JF, Strauss HW, Higgins JPT, Tanaka K, Blankenberg FG, ESQUIVEL CO, Krams SM. Apoptosisand allograft rejection in the absence of CD8+ T cells. Transplantation 71:1827-34;2001.Lai KM, Millan M, Razavi M, Keeffe EB, Prapong W, Fisher GA, ESQUIVEL CO, So SKS. Center experience in liver transplantation forhepatocellular carcinoma associated with cirrhosis. Transplant Proc 33:1490-1;2001.Cox K, Rodriguez-Baez N, Nasr A, ESQUIVEL C. Mortality rate correlated with the number of pediatric liver transplants performed at a center.Transplant Proc 33:1512-13; 2001.A.S. Snow*, L.J. Chen*, R.R. Nepomuceno, S.M. Krams, ESQUIVEL CO,O.M. Martinez. Resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis in EBV infected B cell lymphomas is due to defects in the proximal fas signalingpathway. J of Immunology. 167:5404-5411,2001.Millan MT, Natkunam Y, Clarke-Katzenberg R, Desai D, Prapong W, So SK, ESQUIVEL CO, Sibley R, Ferran C, Martinez OM. Epstein-Barrvirus infection is associated with endothelial Bcl-2 expression in transplant liver allografts. Transplantation 73:465-9, 2002.Falco DA, Nepomuceno RR, Salvatierra O, Alexander SR, ESQUIVEL CO, Cox KL, Lee PP, Davis MM, Frankel LR, Krams SM, MartinezOM. Identification of Epstein-Barr virus specific CD8+ T lymphocytes in the circulation of pediatric transplant recipients. Transplantation74:501-510, 2002.Lu A, Monge H, Drazan K, Millan M, ESQUIVEL CO. Liver transplantation for fulminant hepatitis at Stanford University. J Gastroenterol 37:82-87;2002.Zajicek A, ESQUIVEL CO, Millan M, Cox K, Berquist R, Berquist W. Thirteen years’ experience in pediatric liver transplantation:differences between tacrolimus and cyclosporine. Transplant Proc 34:1976-78; 2002.Ku NO, Darling JM, Krams SM, ESQUIVEL CO, Keeffe EB, Sibley RK, Lee YM, Wright TL, Omary MB. Keratin 8 and 18 mutations arerisk factors for developing liver disease of multiple etiologies. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2003 May 13;100 (10): 6063-6068.Millan MT, Berquist WE, So SK, Sarwal MM, Wayman KI, Cox KL, Filler G, Salvatierra O, ESQUIVEL CO. 100% patient and kidneyallograft survival with simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation in infants with primary hyperoxaluria – a single center experience.Transplantation 76:1458-1463; 2003.Shibata M, Yanaga K, Morizane T, Yanagawa T, Hirakawa M, Ueno Y, ESQUIVEL CO, Mitamura K. A patient with hepatitis C-relatedliver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma who was cured with an orthotopic liver transplantation and interferon therapy. J Gastroenterol38:598-602; 2003.Omary MB, ESQUIVEL CO. American Gastroenterological Association – Our New President – Emmet B. Keeffe, M.D. Gastroenterology126:1454-60;2004.Hurwitz M, Desai DM, Cox KL, Berquist WE, ESQUIVEL CO, Millan MT. Complete immunosuppressive withdrawal as a uniformapproach to post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric liver transplantation. Pediatr Transplantation 8:267-72;2004.Obara H, Nagasaki K, Ogura Y, Hsieh CL, ESQUIVEL CO, Martinez OM, Krams SM. IFN-γ, produced by NK cells that infiltrate liverallografts early after transplantation, links the innate and adaptive immune responses. American Journal of Transplantation 5:2094-2103:2005.Ku NO, Lim JK, Krams SM, ESQUIVEL CO, Keeffe EB, Wright TL, Parry DAD, Omary MB. Keratins as susceptibility genes for end-stageliver disease. Gastroenterology 129:885-893, 2005.Sharek PJ, Wayman K, Lin E, Strichartz D, Sentivany-Collins S, Good J, ESQUIVEL CO, Brown M, Cox K. Improved pain managementin pediatric postoperative liver transplant patients using parental education and non-pharmacologic interventions. Pediatr Transplantation10:172-77; 2006.Berquist RK, Berquist WE, ESQUIVEL CO, Cox KL, Wayman KI, Litt IF. Adolescent non-adherence: Prevalence and consequences inliver transplant recipients. Pediatr Transplantation 10:304-10; 2006.Castillo RO, Zarge R, Cox K, Strichartz D, Berquist W, Bonham C, ESQUIVEL CO. Pediatric Intestinal Transplantation at PackardChildren’s Hospital/Stanford University Medical Center: Report of a Four Year Experience. Transplant Proc 38:1716-1717, 2006.Snow AL, Lambert SL, Natkunam Y, ESQUIVEL CO, Krams SM, Martinez OM. Epstein-Barr virus can protect latently infected B celllymphomas from death receptor-induced apoptosis. J Immunol. In Press
    • Abstracts:Ogura Y, Martinez OM, ESQUIVEL CO, Krams SM. Caspase activation and apoptosis occurs in the absence or presence of CD8+CTL.American Journal of Transplantation Supplement 1, 1:445;2001.Falco DA, Nepomuceno RR, Robbins PA, Krams SM, Lee P, Davis M, Alexander S, Cox K, Salvatierra O, ESQUIVEL CO, Martinez OM.Identification of EBV-specific CD8+ T cells using MHC/peptide tetramers in pediatric transplant recipients. American Journal ofTransplantation Supplement 1, 1:471;2001.Desai DM, Millan MT, O’Hali WA, Zajicek A, Monge HL, Cox KL, Castillo R, Berquist WE, ESQUIVEL CO. Influence of race onoutcomes in pediatric liver transplantation. American Journal of Transplantation Supplement 3, 2:295;2002.Balatoni CE, Nepomuceno RR, Krams SM, ESQUIVEL CO, Martinez OM. Sirolimus inhibits the growth of Espstein-Barr virus associatedB cell lymphomas in vivo. American Journal of Transplantation Supplement 3, 2:322;2002.Obara H, Hsieh CL, Ogura Y, Martinez OM, ESQUIVEL CO, Krams SM. Characterization of NK cells in liver transplantation. AmericanJournal of Transplantation Supplement 3, 2:335; 2002.Berquist WE, Zajicek A, Berquist R, Cox K, Millan M, ESQUIVEL CO. Experience in pediatric liver transplantation over thirteen years:differences between tacrolimus and cyclosporine. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:73; 2003.Hurwitz M, Desai DM, Cox KL, ESQUIVEL CO, Millan MT. Complete immunosuppressive drug withdrawal as a uniform approach topost-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric liver transplantation. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:76;2003.Wayman KI, ESQUIVEL CO, Cox KL. A comparison of IQ scores and school performance of children with biliary atresia 6,8, & 10 yearsfollowing extrahepatic liver transplantation. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:110;2003.Cox KL, Wayman KI, Berquist WE, Castillo R, ESQUIVEL CO. A descriptive analysis of a pediatric liver transplant outreach model ofpatient care at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:111;2003.Berquist R, Wayman KI, Cox KL, ESQUIVEL CO. Increased rejection episodes in non-compliant adolescents after liver transplantation.Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:124;2003.Wayman KI, ESQUIVEL CO, Cox KL. A comparison of the developmental outcome of children with biliary atresia transplanted birth to 7months of age with children transplanted 8 to 15 months of age. Pediatric Transplantation 7-Suppl 4:125;2003.Obara H, Martinex OM, Ogura Y, Hsieh CL, ESQUIVEL CO, Krams SM. NK cells with cytolytic activity are recruited to liver allograftsearly post-transplantation. American Journal of Transplantation Supplement 5, 3:183;2003.Hurwitz M, Desai DM, Cox KL, ESQUIVEL CO, Millan MT. Complete immunosuppressive drug withdrawal as a uniform approach to post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric liver transplantation. American Journal of Transplantation Supplement 5, 3:306;2003.Obara H, Hsieh CL, Ogura Y, ESQUIVEL CO, Martinez OM, Krams SM. The effect of in vivo treatment with anti-asialo GM1 antibodieson the survival of rat liver allografts. American Journal of Transplantation Supplement 5, 3:540;2003.Ahmed A, Charuworn P, Leung C, Lim J, Cheung C, Sze D, Razavi M, ESQUIVEL CO, Keeffe E. Prophylactic transjugular intrahepaticportosystemic shunt (TIPS) in Child’s Class B cirrhotics with large gastric fundal varices (LGFV): A pilot study. (Submitted 12/03)Obara H, Martinez OM, Ogura Y, Hsieh CL, ESQUIVEL CO, Krams SM. NK cells recruited to liver allografts are a sourse of IFN-γ.American Journal of Transplantation Supplement 8, 4:334;2004Campisi M, Zwierzchoniewska M, Fedoseyeva, Krams SM, Robbins RC, ESQUIVEL CO, Martinez OM. The role of CD30 in alloimmuneresponses. American Journal of Transplantation Supplement 8, 4:1612;2004Berquist RK, Berquist WE, ESQUIVEL CO, Cox KL, Wayman KI, Litt IF. Prevalence, demographic variables and adverse outcomesassociated with n on-adherence to immunosuppressiver therapy in adolescent liver transplant recipients. Presented at Twenty-FirstAnnual Stanford Medical Student Research Symposium. May 6, 2004Nagasaki K, Obara H, Hsieh C, ESQUIVEL CO, Martinez OM, Krams SM. IFN-γ, produced by NK cells recruited to liver allografts earlyafter transplantation, links the innate and adaptive immune responses. American Journal of Transplantation Supplement 11, 5:434;2005Castillo RO, Zarge R, Cox KL, Strichartz D, Berquist WE, Hurwitz M, Bonham CA, ESQUIVEL CO. Pediatric intestinal transplantation atStanford University/Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital (SU/LPCH). Poster presented at IX International Small Bowel TransplantationSymposium, June 30 – July 2, 2005, Brussels, Belgium.
    • Snow, AL, Lambert SL, Natkunam Y, ESQUIVEL CO, Krams SM, Martinez OM. Epstein-Barr virus can protect latently infected B celllymphomas from death receptor-induced apoptosis. World Transplant Congress, July 22-27, 2006.Beaunoyer M, Vanatta J, Ogihara M, Strichartz D, Cox K, ESQUIVEL CO. The Milan Criteria do not apply to children with hepatocellularcarcinoma (HCC). World Transplant Congress, July 22-27, 2006.Nagasaki K, Obara H, Hsieh CL, ESQUIVEL CO, Martinez OM, Krams SM. NK cell depletion prolongs the survival of rat liver allografts.World Transplant Congress, July 22-27, 2006.Nagasaki K, Obara H, Kambham N, Xiong A, ESQUIVEL CO, Strober S, Millan M. Tolerance to liver allografts in rats conditioned withposttransplant total lymphoid irradiation. World Transplant Congress, July 22-27, 2006.Stevenson TN, Enns G, Berquist W, Wayman K, Sarwal M, ESQUIVEL CO, Millan M. Long-term outcome following pediatric livertransplantation for metabolic disorders. World Transplant Congress, July 22-27, 2006.Nguyen C, Stenard F, Cox K, Umetsu D, ESQUIVEL CO, Martinez O. Circulating regulatory T-cells (CD4+CD25+FOXP3+) inverselycorrelate with acute rejection and inflammation in pediatric liver transplant patients. World Transplant Congress, July 22-27, 2006.Campisi J, Zwierzchoniewska M, Nogouchi N, Bahl M, Crespo O, Fedoseyeva EV, Krams SM, Robbins RC, ESQUIVEL CO. CD30 andregulation of chronic inflammatory alloimmune responses. World Transplant Congress, July 22-27, 2006.
    • Appendix B CURRICULUM VITAE CV should be condensed to fit this page. Do not add additional pages except as directed below.Append bibliography for the past FIVE YEARS ONLY, limited to articles published or in press and abstracts presented. Name: Emmet B. Keeffe, M.D. Position: Chief of Hepatology, Co-Director, Liver Transplant Program, Stanford University Medical Center Address: 750 Welch Road, Suite 210, Palo Alto, CA 94304 Professional education (including dates and degrees obtained): Bachelor of Science, University of California San Francisco,1964 M.D., Creighton University, Omaha, NE, 1969 Hospital training (including dates of internships, residencies, fellowships, etc.) Internship, Oregon Health Sciences University, 1969-1970 Residency in Internal Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences University, 1970-1972 (Chief Resident, 1972-1973) Fellowship in Gastroenterology, Oregon Health Sciences University, 1973-1974 Research Fellow/Gastroenterology, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 1977-1979 Current professional appointments: Professor of Medicine Primary certification (including date): American Board of Internal Medicine, 1972 Subspecialty certification (including date): American Board of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology, 1975 Recertification (including date): Professional activities/committees: Past President, American Gastroenterological Association, 2004 Member, Editorial Board, American Journal of Gastroenterology; Member, Editorial Board, AGA Perspectives; Executive Editor, GastroHep.com; Member, Editorial Board, Journal of Hepatology; Member, Editorial Board, Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation; Member, Gastroenterology Section, Medscape Editorial Board
    • Peer-reviewed Journal ArticlesAhmed A, Samuels SL, Keeffe EB, Cheung RC. Delayed fatal hemorrhage from pseudoaneurysm of the hepatic artery afterpercutaneous liver biopsy. Am J Gastroenterol 2001;96:233-7.Wu SS, Lin OS, Chen YY, Hwang KL, Soon MS, Keeffe EB. Ascitic fluid carcinoembyonic antigen and alkaline phosphatase levels forthe differentiation of primary from secondary bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients. J Hepatol 2001;34:215-221.Bravata DM, Olkin I, Barnato AE, Keeffe EB, Owens DK. Employment and alcohol use after liver transplantation for alcoholic andnonalcoholic liver disease: a systematic review. Liver Transpl 2001;7:191-203.Ahmed A, Keeffe EB. Update on hepatitis C infection. Patient Care 2001;35:75-89.Auffermann-Gretzinger S, Keeffe EB, Levy S. Impaired dendritic cell maturation in individuals with chronic, but not with resolved,hepatitis C virus infection. Blood 2001;97:3171-6.Teo EK, Han SH, Terrault N, Luketic V, Jensen D, Keeffe EB, Lok AS. Liver transplantation in patients with hepatitis B virus infection:outcome in Asians versus white patients. Hepatology 2001;34:126-32.Keeffe BG, Valantine H, Keeffe EB. Detection and treatment of coronary artery disease in liver transplant recipients. Liver Transpl2001;7:755-61.Boisvert J, He XS, Cheung R, Keeffe EB, Wright T, Greenberg HB. Quantitative analysis of hepatitis C virus in peripheral blood andliver: replication detected only in liver. J Infect Dis 2001;184:827-35.Yu AS, Ahmed A, Keeffe EB. Liver transplantation: evolving patient selection criteria. Can J Gastroenterol 2001;15:729-38.Nevins AB, Keeffe EB. Acute pancreatitis after gastrointestinal endoscopy. J Clin Gastroenterol 2002;34:94-5.Galun E, Eren R, Safadi R, Ashour Y, Terrault N, Keeffe EB, Matot E, Mizrachi S, Terkieltaub D, Zohar M, Lubin I, Gopher J, ShouvalD, Dagan S. Clinical evaluation (phase I) of a combination of two human monoclonal antibodies to HBV: safety and antiviralproperties. Hepatology 2002;35:673-9.Cheung RC, Hanson AK, Maganti K, Keeffe EB, Matsui SM. Viral hepatitis and other infectious diseases in a homeless population. JClin Gastroenterol 2002;34:476-80.Fontana RJ, Keeffe EB, Carey W, Fried M, Reddy R, Kowdley KV, Soldelvilla-Pico C, McClure LA, Lok AS, NIH HBV-OLT StudyGroup. Effect of lamivudine treatment on survival of 309 North American patients awaiting liver transplantation for chronic hepatitis B.Liver Transpl 2002;8:433-9.Nguyen MH, Garcia RT, Simpson PW, Wright TL, Keeffe EB. Racial differences in effectiveness of α-fetoprotein for the diagnosis ofhepatocellular carcinoma in HCV cirrhosis. Hepatology 2002;36:410-7.Boisvert J, Kunkel EJ, Campbell JJ, Keeffe EB, Butcher EC, Greenberg HB. Liver-infiltrating lymphocytes in end-stage hepatitis C:subsets, activation status, and chemokine receptor phenotypes. J Hepatol 2003;38:67-75.Yen T, Keeffe EB, Ahmed A. Epidemiology of hepatitis C virus infection. J Clin Gastroenterol 2003;36:47-53.Ku NO, Darling JM, Krams SM, Esquivel CO, Keeffe EB, Sibley RK, Lee YM, Wright TL, Omary MB. Keratin 8 and 18 mutations arerisk factors for developing liver disease of multiple etiologies. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2003;100:6063-8.Simpson ND, Simpson PW, Ahmed AM, Nguyen MH, Garcia G, Keeffe EB, Ahmed A. Prophylaxis against chemotherapy-inducedreactivation of hepatitis B virus infection with lamivudine: a case series. J Clin Gastroenterol 2003;37:68-71.Verma R, Keeffe EB, Ahmed A. MELD score: the implementation of evidenced-based selection criteria for allocation of donor livers.Pract Gastroenterol 2003;27:13-21.
    • Chu CJ, Keeffe EB, Han SH, Perrillo RP, Min AD, Soldevila-Pico C, Carey W, Brown RS Jr, Luketic VA, Terrault N, Lok AS.Hepatitis B virus genotypes in the United States: results of a nationwide study. Gastroenterology 2003;125:444-51.Chu CJ, Keeffe EB, Han SH, Perrillo RP, Min AD, Soldevila-Pico C, Carey W, Brown RS Jr, Luketic VA, Terrault N, Lok AS.Prevalence of HBV precore/core promoter variants in the United States. Hepatology 2003;38:619-28.Zaman A, Fennerty MB, Keeffe EB. Systematic review: peginterferon vs. standard interferon in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C.Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2003;18:661-70.Keeffe EB, Dieterich DT, Han SB, Jacobson IM, Martin P, Schiff ER, Tobias H, Wright TL. A treatment algorithm for the managementof chronic hepatitis B virus infection in the U.S. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2004;2:87-106.Reiss G, Keeffe EB. Review article: hepatitis vaccination in patients with chronic liver disease. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2004;19:715-27.Keeffe EB. Occupational risk for hepatitis A: a literature-based analysis. J Clin Gastroenterol 2004;38:440-8.Ahmed A, Keeffe EB. Chronic hepatitis C with normal aminotransferesase levels. Gastroenterology 2004;126:1409-15.Lin OS, Keeffe EB, Sanders GD, Owens DK. Cost-effectiveness of screening for hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with cirrhosisdue to chronic hepatitis C. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2004;19:1159-72.Keswani RN, Ahmed A, Keeffe EB. Older age and liver transplantation: a review. Liver Transpl 2004;10:957-67.Nguyen MH, Whittemore AS, Garcia RT, Tawfeek SA, Ning J, Lam S, Wright TL, Keeffe EB. Role of ethnicity in risk for hepatocellularcarcinoma in patients with chronic hepatitis C and cirrhosis. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2004;2:820-4.Locarnini S, Hatzakis A, Heathcote J, Keeffe E, Liang TJ, Mutimer D, Pawlotsky JM, Zoulim F. Management of antiviral resistance inpatients with chronic hepatitis B. Antivir Ther 2004;9:679-693.Balan V, Schwartz D, Wu GY, Muir AJ, Ghalib R, Jackson J, Keeffe EB, Rossaro L, Burnett A, Goon BL, Bowers PJ, Leitz GL, HCVNatural History Study Group. Erythropoietic response to anemia in chronic hepatitis C patients receiving combination pegylatedinterferon/ribavirin. Am J Gastroenterol 2005;100:299-307.Ichiki Y, He XS, Shimoda S, Ishibashi H, Keeffe EB, Rossaro L, Gershwin ME. T cell immunity in hepatitis B and hepatitis C virusinfection: implications for autoimmunity. Autoimmun Rev 2005;4:82-95.Sze DY, Magsamen KE, McClenathan JH, Keeffe EB, Dake MD. Portal hypertensive hemorrhage from a left gastroepiploic vein caputmedusa in an adhesed umbilical hernia. J Vasc Interv Radiol 2005;16:281-285.Rajvanshi P, Kowdley KV, Hirota WK, Meyers JB, Keeffe EB. Fulminant hepatic failure secondary to neoplastic infiltration of the liver.J Clin Gastroenterol 2005;39:339-343.Kowdley KV, Brandhagen DJ, Gish RG, Bass NM, Weinstein J, Schilsky ML, Fontana RJ, McCashland T, Cotler SJ, Bacon BR, KeeffeEB, Gordon F, Polissar H, for the National Hemochromatosis Transplant Registry (NHTR). Survival after liver transplantation inpatients with hepatic iron overload: the national hemochromatosis transplant registry. Gastroenterology 2005;129:494-503.Crockett SD, Keeffe EB. Current perspectives: liver transplantation in the elderly. Aging Health 2005;1:59-76.Ku NO, Lim JK, Krams SM, Esquivel CO, Keeffe EB, Wright TL, Parry DA, Omary MB. Keratins as susceptibility genes for end-stageliver disease. Gastroenterology 2005;129:885-93.Crockett SD, Keeffe EB. Natural history and treatment of patients coinfected with hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses. Ann ClinMicrobiol Antibicrob 2005;4:13.Nguyen MH, Keeffe EB. Prevalence and treatment of hepatitis C virus genotypes 4, 5, and 6. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2005;3:S97-S101.
    • Keeffe EB. Chronic hepatitis C: management of treatment failures. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2005;3:S102-S105.Gershwin ME, Selmi C, Worman HJ, Gold EB, Watnik M, Utts J, Lindor KD, Kaplan MM, Vierling JM, USA PBC Epidemiology Group(EB Keeffe). Risk factors for comorbidities in primary biliary cirrhosis: a controlled interview-based study of 1032 patients. Hepatology2005;42:1194-1202.Fung SK, Andreone P, Han SH, Reddy KR, Regev A, Keeffe EB, Hussain M, Cursano C, Richtmyer P, Marrero JA, Lok AS. Adefovir-resistant hepatitis B can be associated with viral rebound and hepatic decompensation. J Hepatol 2005;43:973-43.Perrillo RP, Gish RG, Peters M, Keeffe EB, Alberti A, Buti M, Cooksley WGE, Fried MW, Hadziyannis SJ, Liaw YF, Naoumov NV,Schiff ER, Thio CL, Tsai N, Schalm S. Chronic hepatitis B: a critical appraisal of current approaches to therapy. Clin GastroenterolHepatol 2006;4:233-48.Reiss G, Kunz P, Koin D, Keeffe EB. Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections in nursing homes: review of literature and report of recentoutbreak. J Am Geriatr Soc 2006;54:680-4.Keeffe EB, Dieterich DT, Han SB, Jacobson IM, Martin P, Schiff ER, Tobias H, Wright TL. A treatment algorithm for the managementof chronic hepatitis B virus infection in the United States: an update. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2006;4:936-62.AbstractsAuffermann-Gretzinger S, Keeffe EB, Levy S. Impaired maturation of dendritic cells in individuals with chronic but not resolvedhepatitis C virus infection. FASEB J 2001;15:A1011. Presented to the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology.Kowdley KV, Brandhagen DJ, Gish RG, Bass N, Weinstein JS, Schilsky, Fontana RJ, McCashland T, Cotler S, Bacon B, Keeffe EB,Polissar N. Survival after orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) among patients with hepatic iron overload: interim results from the NationalHemochromatosis Transplant Registry (NHTR). Hepatology 2001;34:236A. Presented at the American Association for the Study ofLiver Diseases, Dallas.Chu CJ, Han SH, Perrillo RP, Keeffe E, Min AD, Carey W, Soldevila-Pico C, Terrault N, Lai M, Lok AS. Prevalence of HBV procoreand core promoter variants in the United States. Hepatology 2001;34:617A.Chu CJ, Han SH, Perrillo RP, Keeffe E, Min AD, Carey W, Soldevila-Pico C, Terrault N, Brown RS, Lok AS. Molecular epidemiologyof HBV infection in the United States. Hepatology 2001;34:617A.Nguyen MH, Keeffe EB, Wright TL. Sensitivity and specificity of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in U.S. patients with hepatitis C virus-relatedhepatocellular carcinoma (HCV/HCC). Hepatology 2001;34:663A.Nguyen M, Keeffe E, Wright T. Sensitivity and specificity of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in U.S. patients with hepatitis C virus-relatedhepatocellular carcinoma (HCV/HCC). J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2002;17(Suppl):A772. Presented at the World Congress ofGastroenterology, Bangkok, Thailand.Chu CJ, Keeffe EB, Han SH, Perrillo R, Min AD, Carey W, Soldevila-Pico C, Luketic VA, Brown RS Jr, Terrault N, Jensen D, Lok AS,U.S. HBV Epidemiology Study Group. Prevalence of HBV precore and core promoter variants in the United States – results of anation-wide study. J Hepatol 2002;36(suppl 1):179-80. Presented at the European Association for the Study of Liver Diseases,Madrid.Chu CJ, Keeffe EB, Han SH, Perrillo R, Min AD, Carey W, Soldevila-Pico C, Luketic VA, Brown RS Jr, Terrault N, Jensen D, Lok AS,U.S. HBV Epidemiology Study Group. HBV genotypes I the United States – results of a nation-wide study. Gastroenterology2002;122:A-627-8. Presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, San Francisco.Ku OK, Darling J, Wright T, Esquivel CO, Keeffe EB, Krams S, Omary M. Keratin mutations predispose to cryptogenic andnoncryptogenic liver disease. Gastroenterology 2002;122:A-80. Presented at the American Gastroenterological Association, SanFrancisco.Ahmed A, Nguyen M, Keswani RH, Grossi J, Keeffe EB. The role of recombinant human erythropoietin (epoetin alfa) in themanagement of ribavirin (RBV)-induced anemia. Am J Gastroenterol 2002;97:S104. Presented at the American College ofGastroenterology, Seattle.
    • Galun E, Safadi R, Terrault N, Keeffe E, Shouval D, Ashur Y, Pappo O, Terkieltaub D, Zohar M, Zohar Y, Eren, Dagan S. Clinicalevaluation (phase II) of a mixture of two human monoclonal antibodies to HBV in combination with lamivudine: safety and antiviralproperties. Hepatology 2002;36:635A.Nguyen MH, Wright TL, Garcia RT, Mahmood G, Bacchetti P, Keeffe EB. Effects of ethnicity on risk for hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) in U.S. patients with hepatitis C cirrhosis. Hepatology 2002;36:688A.Nguyen MH, Garcia RT, Ning J, Tawfeet SA, Lam S, Mahmood G, Wright TL, Keeffe EB. Racial differences in risk for liver cancer inpatients with hepatitis C cirrhosis: a multicenter case-control study. Gastroenterology 2003;124:A-699. Presented at the AmericanAssociation for the Study of Liver Diseases, Orlando.Ku NO, Darling JM, Krams SH, Esquivel CO, Keeffe EB, Wright TL, Omary MB. A new and highly prevalent keratin mutation inpatients with liver disease. Gastroenterology 2003;124:A-76. Presented at the American Gastroenterological Association, Orlando.Balan V, Wu GY, Muir AJ, Keeffe EB, Bower PJ. Erythropoietic response to anemia is decreased in patients infected with hepatitis Cvirus (HCV) receiving combination ribavirin and pegylated interferon (RBV/PEG-IFN) therapy. Gastroenterology 2003;124:A-751.Presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Orlando.Nguyen MH, Trinh HN, Garcia RT, Ning J, Keeffe EB. Evaluation and outcomes of combination therapy with interferon orpeginterferon plus ribavirin in 67 Southeast Asian patients with hepatitis C genotypes 6, 7, 8 and 9. Hepatology 2003;38:645A.Presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Boston.Ku NO, Lim JK, Krams SM, Esquivel CO, Keeffe EB, Wright TL, Parry D, Omary MB. Keratins as susceptibility genes for liverdisease. Gastroenterology 2004;126:A-40. Presented at the American Gastroenterological Association, New Orleans.Ahmed A, Leung C, Charuworn P, Grossi J, Cheung RC, Keeffe EB. Factors that improve the efficacy of epoetin alfa for maintenanceof ribavirin weight-based dosing (RBV WBD). Gastroenterology 2004;126:A-698. Presented at the American Association for the Studyof Liver Diseases, New Orleans.Ahmed A, Charuworn P, Leung C, Lim J, Cheung RC, Sze D, Razavi M, Esquivel CO, Keeffe EB. Prophylactic transjugularintrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in Child’s class B cirrhotics with large gastric fundal varices (LGFV): a pilot study.Gastroenterology 2004;126:A-732. Presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, New Orleans.Nguyen MH, Trinh H, Garcia RT, Ning J, Keeffe E. High prevalence of novel genotypes in Vietnamese patients with chronic hepatitisC. Gastroenterology 2004;126:A-742.Lok AS, Regev A, Keeffe EB, Han SH, Emre S, Ishitani M, Luketeic V, Brown R, Fung SK, Hussain M, HBV-OLT Study Group.Relation between HBV genotypes and HBV variants and indications for liver transplant (LT) in hepatitis B patients in the U.S.Hepatology 2004;40:191A. Presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Boston.Andrews J, Tirucherai GS, Dagan S, Eren R, Terrault N, Galun E, Keeffe EB, Schettler J, Graham N. Correlates of response inpatients with chronic HBV infection receiving libivirumab and exbivirumab (HepeX-B™). Hepatology 2004;40:651A. Presented at theAmerican Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Boston.Choi BY, Ahmed A, Razavi M, Sze D, Simpson N, Garcia RT, Keeffe EB, Nguyen MH. Treatment outcomes of transcatheter arterialchemoinfusion (TACI) in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Am J Gastroenterol 2004;99:S83. Presented atthe American College of Gastroenterology, Orlando.Nguyen MH, Trinh H, Garcia RT, Vien P, Ahmed A, Keeffe EB. Hepatitis C is a major etiology for HCC in Vietnamese Americans. AmJ Gastroenterol 2004;99:S85. Presented at the American College of Gastroenterology, Orlando.Tran CP, Garcia RT, Lam VT, Hoang TT, Keeffe EB, Nguyen MH. Lead poisoning as an etiology of abdominal pain and intestinalpseudo-obstruction in adults. Am J Gastroenterol 2004;99:S105. Presented at the American College of Gastroenterology, Orlando.Di Bisceglie A, Keeffe E, Attilasoy E, Varshneya R, Bergstein G. Management of chronic hepatitis B – an analysis of physicianpractices. Gastroenterology 2005;128:A-739. Presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Chicago.
    • Fung S, Hussain M, Andreone P, Han SH, Reddy R, Regev A, Keeffe E, Marrero J, Richtmyer P, Lok A. Resistance to adefovir (ADV)is associated with significant virologic breakthrough (BT) and hepatic decompensation. Gastroenterology 2005;128:A-739. Presentedat the America Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Chicago.Kamal A, Crockett S, Yeh RW, Roost J, Keeffe EB, Ahmed A. Prophylactic TIPS for large gastric varices: a pilot study with four-yearprospective experience. Am J Gastroenterol 2005;100:S110. Presented at the American College of Gastroenterology, Honolulu.Reddy R, Gaglio P, Keeffe E, Soldevila-Pico C, Emre S, Ishitani M, Fung SK, Lok A, NIH HBV-OLT Study Group. Characteristics andoutcomes following liver transplantation (OLT) in patients with HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC): data from the US HBV-OLT study. Hepatology 2005;42:240A. Presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, San Francisco.Perrillo RP, Gish RG, Peters M, Keeffe E, Alberti A, Buti-Ferret M, Cooksley WGE, Fried MW, Hadziyannis SJ, Liaw YF, NaoumovNV, Schiff ER, Thio CL, Tsai N, Schalm SW. A critical appraisal of current approaches to treatment of chronic hepatitis B (CHB)based on a review by an international panel of investigators and AASLD membership. Hepatology 2005;42:283A. Presented at theAmerican Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, San Francisco.Nguyen MH, Trinh H, Garcia RT, Ahmed A, Keeffe EB. Significant histologic disease in HBV-infected patients with normal tominimally elevated ALT levels at initial evaluation. Hepatology 2005;42:593A. Presented at the American Association for the Study ofLiver Diseases, San Francisco.Nguyen MH, Trinh H, Garcia RT, Hoda K, Keeffe EB. Treatment outcomes to combination therapy in patients with HCV genotype 6.Hepatology 2005;42:669A. Presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, San Francisco.Choi BY, Ahmed A, Razavi M, Sze D, Frisoli J, Simpson N, Garcia RT, Keeffe EB, Nguyen MH. Treatment outcomes of transcatheterarterial chemoinfusion (TACI) in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Gastroenterology 2006;130:A-498.Presented at the American Gastroenterological Association, Los Angeles.Wong S, Reddy R, Keeffe E, Han S, Perrillo B, Tran T, Pruett T, Lok A, NIH HBV-OLT Study Group. Overall and post-liver transplant(OLT) outcome of patients listed for HBV-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are similar to those listed for HBV-cirrhosis: data from theUS HBV-OLT study. Gastroenterology 2006;130:A-755. Presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, LosAngeles.
    • RESIDENCY REVIEW COMMITTEE FOR PEDIATRICS PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY Program Information Form ChecklistUse this checklist before submitting the forms to the RRC office. The RRC considers it theresponsibilityof the program director to ensure that the application materials are complete and are submitted inaccordance with the instructions. The signature of the program director on the forms indicateshis/her approval of the content. A review of the instructions provided at the beginning of the formand on individual pages is suggested._______ Have the appropriate person(s) signed page 1 of the forms where requested?_______ Is the form free of unrequested schedules, printouts, reprints, catalogues, brochures, etc?_______ Do the CVs attached as Appendix A follow appropriate instructions regarding their length? _______ Are all requested official letters of agreement/affiliation appended as requested on pages1 and 2?_______ Has the final copy been carefully proofread and has it been checked to see that every question has been answered, every chart completed, etc.?_______ Has the ACGME letter of report regarding the Institutional Review of the Sponsoring Institution been appended?Once the preparer is satisfied that the form has been completed and assembled correctly, make theappropriate number of copies. After the copies have been made, review the individual sets to besure that all of the copied pages are legible and that each set of forms contains all of the pages inthe original. ALL PAGES INCLUDED IN THE FORM SHOULD BE 8-1/2” BY 11.” DO NOT USEUNDERSIZED OR OVERSIZED SHEETS. The completed copies of the form may be secured withone large clip or enclosed in a folder. DO NOT STAPLE. Holes should not be punched in the formand it should not be attached to the folder.
    • CONTENTS PROGRAM NAME: PROGRAM #:Retain our pagination followed through the form, e.g., 8, 8a, 8b, etc. When you finish, go through the form, number each pagesequentially with black ink or typed in upper right hand corner. Report this pagination on this page. Place this page at the front of theform. SECTION IN PROGRAM INFORMATION FORM Page Number(s) 1. Training Sites Sponsoring Institution Participating Institutions 2. Pediatric Gastroenterology Residents 3. Program Faculty A. Program Director B. Faculty C. Curriculum Vitae (Appendices A & B) D. Program Staff 4. Facilities and Services 5. Patient Data Inpatient Service --- Ambulatory Experience --- 6. 12 Month Summary: Outpatient Clinics/Inpatient Services 7. List of Diagnoses --- 8. Skill Objectives 9. Content of Training Program 10. Conferences 11. Narrative Description of the Pediatric Gastroenterology Program A. Program Goals and Objectives B. Relationship to Other Programs C. Specialty Experiences D. Research Program E. Service Duties F. Library Facilities G. Evaluation 12. Appendices Appendix A (Program Director’s Full CV) Appendix B (Teaching Staff CV’s)
    • SECTION IN PROGRAM INFORMATION FORM Page Number(s) Appendix C (Letters of Agreement)