Amodal Perception in Hybrid Forms of Experienced Agency in Shared Multimodal Gamespace

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Slides for a talk at "Forme e Formalizzazioni", XVI Convegno Nazionale of the Società Italiana di Filosofia del Linguaggio, Cagliari, Italy, 10-12 Settembre 2009

Slides for a talk at "Forme e Formalizzazioni", XVI Convegno Nazionale of the Società Italiana di Filosofia del Linguaggio, Cagliari, Italy, 10-12 Settembre 2009

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  • 1. A MODAL PERCEPTION IN HYBRID FORMS OF EXPERIENCED AGENCY IN SHARED MULTIMODAL GAMESPACE PATRICK J. COPPOCK DIPARTIMENTO DI SCIENZE SOCIALI, COGNITIVE E QUANTITATIVE, UNIVERSITA’ DEGLI STUDI DI MODENA E REGGIO EMILIA [email_address] http://game.unimore.it
  • 2. Amodal Perception
    • Alva No ë “Action and Perception” (2004); “Experience Without the Head” (2004); “Real Presence” (2006)
    • Perceptual experience has an uneliminable amodal component.
      • We routinely experience aspects of the physical world as present for us, though some of its empirical details may be hidden from view.
      • “ it seems as if you are aware, in a perceptual modality, of something that is plainly out of view”
      • “ in seeing what is visible, you have a sense – a visual sense – of the presence of the [thing] as a whole”
  • 3. Enacting Phenomenological reality
    • Phenomenologically speaking, nearby environmental detail is experienced as “presence in absence” – such detail is “available”, but will never be completely or holistically represented:
      • “ the world as given to perception is available”
      • “ there is no such thing as seeing all the detail at once”
      • “ perceivers know how to gain access”
  • 4. Enacting Phenomenological Reality
    • We are fully aware that our embodied agency allows us to explore, and meaningfully “fill out”, “missing” details of aspects of our immediate environment:
      • “ experience isn’t something that happens to us, it is something we do”
      • “ enacting perceptual content” [is] “making contact with the world through skillful exercise”
      • ” we have practical knowledge of how to bring […] unperceived items into view by movements of the body”
  • 5. Enacting Phenomenological Reality
    • Environmental detail is “present” for us in the sense that it is constantly available through skillful “probing” of the world
      • “ the world is given to perception as available”
      • “ perceptual experience is a temporally extended activity of skillful probing”
      • “ directed looking” [is] “the visual equivalent of touching”
      • “ what mediates our perceptual relation with he world is only our exploration of the world”
      • “ perceiving is not a way of representing, it is a way of gathering or assembling content”
  • 6. Enacting Phenomenological Reality
    • Our phenomenological experience of the world, and the meanings we attach to this obtain conceptual or other “content” through our exercise of inherited, learned, refined sensorimotor skills.
      • “ perceptual awareness of objects, for enactive direct realism, is an achievement of sensorimotor understanding”
      • “ the world is present – not in our minds – but as available to our inspection”
      • “ the world is present in experience virtually thanks to our online dynamic access to it”
      • “ perceptual experience is virtual all the way in”
  • 7. Another Perspective on Amodality and Enaction
  • 8. Characteristics of Amodal Information
    • Not specific to a particular sense or modality, invariant across two or more senses
    • Possibilities for unconventional, “intuitive” modes of sensory input/output/stimulus
    • Supports augmentative, alternative forms of communication, mediation and interaction, for example in HMI, Augmented Reality, Interface & Game Design &c
  • 9. A Third Approach to Enactive Experience
    • Cussins (2003)
    • Distinction between:
      • “ objectual” knowledge
      • “ experiential” knowledge
  • 10.
    • Objectual Knowledge:
      • The world is given to us as an independent domain of properties and states – as a realm of reference
      • : Normativity “guidance-in-judgement”
    • Experiential Knowledge:
      • The world is given to us as affording us possibilities for movement, action and experience - as a domain of mediation
      • Normativity: “guidance-in-activity”
    A Third Approach to Enactive Experience
  • 11. Remediated Amodal Spatial Perception
  • 12. Remediated Amodal Spatial Perception
  • 13. Remediated Amodal Spatial Perception
  • 14. (Noë 2004: “Action in Perception”) “ we spend our lives in tight coupling with the environment (and other people)” (Noë 2006: “Real Presence”) “ virtual reality experiences […] are best thought of as veridical experiences of virtual worlds, i.e. specially engineered environments” The Sociality of Remediated Enactive Experience
  • 15. The Ludic Sociality of Remediated Enactive Experience
  • 16. The Ludic Sociality of Remediated Enactive Experience
  • 17. The Ludic Sociality of Remediated Enactive Experience
  • 18. The Ludic Sociality of Remediated Enactive Experience
  • 19. The Ludic Sociality of Remediated Enactive Experience