PATHS at VSMM 2012

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Presentation given by Kate Fernie, MDR Partners at VSMM 2012, Milan (5 September) on Personalising Access

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  • Every picture tells a story Women's Auxiliary Army Corps members, France, during World War I. This photograph, thought to be by Tom Aitken, shows four Women's Auxiliary Army Corps (WAAC) members enjoying a swim on a beach in France. The WAAC was a voluntary service started in January 1917 when the loss of life among the men in the army was so great that women were needed for non-military roles. WAAC women served in both Britain and France. The newspapers liked to suggest that the WAACs in France were immoral and often becoming pregnant, but an investigation showed this to be largely unfounded rumour. [Original reads: 'OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. W.A.A.C's bathing on the coast somewhere in France.'] digital.nls.uk/74549132 (National Library of Scotland) 687988345_953ca34d89_o.jpg
  • Every picture tells a story Women's Auxiliary Army Corps members, France, during World War I. This photograph, thought to be by Tom Aitken, shows four Women's Auxiliary Army Corps (WAAC) members enjoying a swim on a beach in France. The WAAC was a voluntary service started in January 1917 when the loss of life among the men in the army was so great that women were needed for non-military roles. WAAC women served in both Britain and France. The newspapers liked to suggest that the WAACs in France were immoral and often becoming pregnant, but an investigation showed this to be largely unfounded rumour. [Original reads: 'OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. W.A.A.C's bathing on the coast somewhere in France.'] digital.nls.uk/74549132 (National Library of Scotland) 687988345_953ca34d89_o.jpg
  • PATHS at VSMM 2012

    1. 1. Personalising Access Kate Fernie, MDR PartnersMark Stevenson, Paul Clough, Paula Goodale, Mark Hall, University of Sheffield, Phil Archer, Konstantinos Chandrinos, iSieve Technologies Andrea de Polo, Alinari 24 ORE, Runar Bergheim, Avinet Jillian Griffiths, MDR Partners Eneko Agirre, Oier Lopez de Lacalle, University of the Basque Country
    2. 2. StartEvery picture tells a storyEveryone has a story to tell
    3. 3. Favourite objects
    4. 4. Interesting places
    5. 5. Memories and associations
    6. 6. Everyone has a story to tellaround the items they see incultural collections or about heritage places
    7. 7. Digitisation
    8. 8. lots of exciting stuff!
    9. 9. The white box paradigmWe can do better than this!
    10. 10. PATHS: project basics• A STREP funded under the FP7 programme• 36 months - 1st January 2011 to 31st December 2013• 6 partners in 5 countries• Research – Information access – User centred systems development http://www.paths-project.eu
    11. 11. Research vision • Supporting users’ knowledge discovery • Pathways/trails for navigation and exploration • Personalisation • Adding contexthttp://www.paths-project.eu
    12. 12. Trails are not a new idea• Museums and Galleries create themed exhibitions
    13. 13. We can do more• Natural Language Processing• Information Extraction• Similarity Calculation• Link Finding• Personalisation
    14. 14. User Research• Professional curators• Interested amateurs• Students• Other potential users User requirements gathering
    15. 15. User behaviours
    16. 16. Research findings• Users like being lead • Want to make own to new things discoveries• Want to see what • Want to contribute other people have their own ideas and created content• Like the idea of a • Want to be able to Path choose a route
    17. 17. Research findings• Users want to tag and comment• Users want to communicate with Path creators and others• Users want to clone and edit
    18. 18. User behavioursFunctional specifications
    19. 19. We Can Do MoreConnections
    20. 20. ConnectionsWomens Auxiliary Army Corps members,enjoying a swim on a beach in France,during World War I.
    21. 21. Connections“No battleplan survivescontact withthe enemy” Churchill
    22. 22. ConnectionsQuirky
    23. 23. Making connectionsContent processing and analysis
    24. 24. Making connections• Curator generated metadata items• Liguistic processing: Point of speech tagging, lemmatization, multi-words• Named entity classification: person, place, organisation• Vocabulary matches• Links between items: similarity measures• Background links: Wikipedia, other articles
    25. 25. The aim is to produceRicher experiences when browsing collections
    26. 26. Implementation: Prototype 1 1. Item + narrative 2. Path navigation 3. Social features 4. Exploration starting points
    27. 27. Implementation 1. Standard vocabularies 2. Visual topics 3. Explore by tag cloud
    28. 28. Evaluation and testingUser trials summer 2012Informing the development of the next PATHS prototype
    29. 29. Thanks for your attention!http://www.paths-project.eu/eng/PrototypeFollow us on:•LinkedIn PATHS-Personalised Access to CHspaces•Facebook PATHS-Personalised Access to CHspaces•Twitter @PATHS_projectkate.fernie@mdrpartners.com
    30. 30. The PATHS Homepage
    31. 31. The Search section
    32. 32. The Explore section
    33. 33. The Paths section
    34. 34. No matter where you are, the Workspace is alwaysavailable
    35. 35. Detailed demonstration: Register/Login
    36. 36. Once you have Registered and Logged in you can seethe Workspace AND My Paths
    37. 37. Search and Add to Workspace
    38. 38. Creating a path
    39. 39. Creating a path
    40. 40. Detailed demonstration: Creating a path
    41. 41. Viewing your path
    42. 42. Creating a path, re-ordering items on your path
    43. 43. Publishing your path

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