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www.ngs.edu  |  800.838.2580
HSM 700v – Principles and Applications in Homeland Security & Defense Course Review This material is protected by United S...
Course Description <ul><li>HSM 700v (Virtual) is a Masters course in the National Graduate School curriculum that concentr...
Course Description Learners also assemble and present a course project presentation applying all of the principles and app...
Course Objectives <ul><li>Learners become familiar with HS&D Principles and Applications of DHS Federal through Tribal lev...
Course Objectives <ul><li>Learners become familiar with fundamentals of HS&D Intra-agency and Inter-agency cooperation, co...
Course Outcomes <ul><li>Learners competent with a thorough understanding of how to utilize research methods, QSM tools and...
Required Readings <ul><li>ADDITIONAL LITERARY RESOURCES </li></ul><ul><li>Learners are encouraged to expand their knowledg...
Required Readings <ul><li>20 Required Readings  </li></ul><ul><li>Homeland Security related literature </li></ul><ul><li>C...
Course Evaluation <ul><li>Grades are based on the following course items: </li></ul><ul><li>  1)  50% Team project submiss...
Course Evaluation <ul><li>Individual essay questions:  30% </li></ul><ul><li>Individual essay questions are submitted in W...
Course Evaluation <ul><li>Grades are based on the following course items: </li></ul><ul><li>  1)  50% Team project submiss...
Course Evaluation <ul><li>Individual essay questions:  30% </li></ul><ul><li>Individual essay questions are submitted in W...
Class Participation <ul><li>Evaluated on quality, not quantity. </li></ul><ul><li>Enhances the Course through collaboratio...
Class Participation <ul><li>Weighing of Class Participation: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>5 = Unique comments, superior analysis ...
Masters Homeland Security Team Project <ul><li>The course project is teamwork oriented.  </li></ul><ul><li>The class will ...
Individual Participation <ul><li>Weeks 1-5  </li></ul><ul><li>Individual Weekly Requirement 1: Provide a response of 250-3...
NGS Policies on Incomplete Grades, Make-up Work, and Attendance <ul><li>NGS fully supports the professional business and m...
Module Schedule & Topics <ul><li>Module 1:  Course Review/HS&D Principles/Applications/DHS Federal, State, Local, Tribal L...
Module Schedule & Topics <ul><li>Module 4:  HS&D Performance Measures & Targets & QSM Applications (Benchmarking, HS&D Six...
HSM 700ol Course Endstate <ul><li>HSM 700v end state is achieved with learners completing all assigned readings, module es...
HSM 700v – Principles and Applications in Homeland Security & Defense Module 1:  This material is protected by United Stat...
National Homeland Security Strategy  Purpose <ul><li>The purpose of our  Strategy is to guide, organize, and unify our Nat...
HS&D Spectrum of Threats
Homeland Security Defined <ul><li>Homeland Security is a concerted national effort to prevent terrorist attacks within the...
Homeland Security Vision & Mission <ul><li>Vision  </li></ul><ul><li>A secure America, a confident public, and a strong an...
HS&D Strategic Framework <ul><li>The  Strategy  provides a common framework through which our entire Nation – Federal, Sta...
Homeland Security Core Values <ul><li>Duty:  Embodying Integrity, Responsibility, and Accountability.  </li></ul><ul><li>W...
Homeland Security Core Values <ul><li>Innovation:  Creating Opportunities.  </li></ul><ul><li>We will identify and explore...
Homeland Security Guiding Principles  <ul><li>Protect Constitutional Rights and American Values.  </li></ul><ul><li>Use an...
RAND Homeland Security Basic Principles <ul><li>Security must be defined broadly to include all efforts to deter, detect, ...
RAND Homeland Security Basic Principles <ul><li>Security will necessarily be reactive. </li></ul><ul><li>Allocations of re...
Rand Homeland Security Basic Principles <ul><li>Inculcate a security culture without creating a security-obsessed state. <...
Rand Homeland Security Basic Principles <ul><li>Technology Development: New systems should be rapidly deployed for testing...
Strategic Goal 1: Protect Our Nation from Dangerous People <ul><li>Objective 1.1: Achieve Effective Control of Our Borders...
Select Reported Measures for Goal 1: Protect Our Nation From Dangerous People
Strategic Goal 2: Protect Our Nation from Dangerous Goods  <ul><li>Objective 2.1: Prevent and Detect Radiological/Nuclear ...
Select Reported Measures for Goal 2: Protect Our Nation From Dangerous Goods
Strategic Goal 3: Protect Critical Infrastructure  <ul><li>Objective 3.1: Protect and Strengthen the Resilience of the Nat...
Select Reported Measures for Goal 3: Protect Critical Infrastructure
Strategic Goal 4: Strengthen Our Nation's Preparedness and Emergency Response Capabilities  <ul><li>Objective 4.1: Ensure ...
Strategic Goal 5: Strengthen and Unify DHS Operations and Management  <ul><li>Objective 5.1: Improve Department Governance...
DHS Performance MGT Framework
Shared Responsibility <ul><li>Homeland security is a shared responsibility built upon a foundation of partnerships.  </li>...
Roles and Responsbilities <ul><li>In today’s dynamic threat environment, we must strive for a national response based on e...
Roles and Responsbilities <ul><li>Private and Non-Profit Sector . The private and non-profit sectors fulfill key roles and...
Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>State Response . State governments have the primary responsibility for  assisting local...
Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Community Response . One of the fundamental response principles is that all incidents s...
Roles and Responsibilities Special Circumstances. There are special circumstances where the Federal Government exercises a...
State & Local Governments <ul><li>This Strategy defines “State” to mean any State of the United States, the District of Co...
State, Local, Tribal Governments <ul><li>America’s constitutional foundations of federalism and limited government place s...
Private & Non Private Sectors <ul><li>The private and non-profit sectors also must be full partners in homeland security. ...
Private & Non Private Sectors <ul><li>The non-profit sector, including volunteer and relief groups and faith-based organiz...
Our National Challenge
Vision <ul><li>Homeland Security is best accomplished  -- </li></ul><ul><ul><li>By building on State and local capabilitie...
<ul><li>Homeland Defense.   The protection of  </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. sovereignty, territory, domestic population, and cri...
<ul><li>Temporary in Time/Limited in Scope : Assist/train state/local, e.g. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Special Events </li></ul...
Roles  Vision  <ul><li>Homeland Security is a national activity best accomplished by: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Domestic agenc...
HD Environment and Response  DoD Roles  <ul><li>Combat Operations within U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>Surge to meet Crisis </li>...
DOD SPT to Homeland Security & Defense <ul><li>HS at the national level has a specific focus on terrorist threats. The DOD...
DOD SPT to Homeland Security & Defense <ul><li>DOD recognizes that threats planned or inspired by &quot;external&quot; act...
DOD SPT to Homeland Security & Defense <ul><li>DOD’s role in the CS mission area consists of support to US civil authoriti...
DOD Homeland Security Framework <ul><li>DOD “prepares and responds” when conducting both HD and CS. </li></ul><ul><li>DOD ...
DOD Homeland Security Framework <ul><li>DOD “prepares and responds” when conducting both HD and CS. </li></ul><ul><li>DOD ...
DOD Homeland Security Framework <ul><li>Preempt.  Preemption consists of proactive measures taken to prevent or neutralize...
Command Relationships <ul><li>Regardless of whether DOD is conducting HD or CS, military forces will always remain under t...
DOD HS&D & Civil Support Paradigm
Paradigm Overlapping Transitions
HS&D Seam Environments
HD & CS Campaign Framework
US NORTHCOM Strategic Construct Homeland Defense Tasks <ul><li>DOD retains core defense missions while supporting lead fed...
Lead Federal Agency/DOD Relationships
Homeland Defense <ul><li>The protection of US sovereignty, territory, domestic population, and critical defense infrastruc...
Homeland Defense & Civil Support Operational Framework
Homeland Defense <ul><li>DOD is the lead, supported by other agencies, in defending against traditional external threats/a...
Homeland Defense <ul><li>DOD is the lead, supported by other agencies, in defending against traditional external threats/a...
Homeland Defense Missions and Operational Elements
Civil Support <ul><li>Employment of military forces within the US, its territories, and possessions, under the auspices of...
Military Support to Civil Authorities
Civil Support <ul><li>Military Support to Civilian Law Enforcement Agencies.  </li></ul><ul><li>Military forces performing...
Civil Support <ul><li>Military Assistance for Civil Disturbances.  </li></ul><ul><li>The President is authorized by the Co...
Military Assistance for Civil Disturbance Operations
Reserve Component Support to HS & D <ul><li>Reserve Component Forces. NG and Reserve forces are collectively referred to a...
Reserve Component Support to HS & D <ul><li>National Guard.  The NG primarily operates under three different command relat...
Reserve Component Support to HS & D <ul><li>National Guard Weapons of Mass Destruction  – Civil Support Teams (WMD-CSTs). ...
Module 1 Reading Requirement <ul><li>Instructor’s Module/Week 1 PPT presentation. </li></ul><ul><li>Kamien, D.  (2006) the...
Module 1 Reading Requirement <ul><li>U.S. Department of Homeland Security (2008),  Strategic Plan Fiscal Years 2008–2013: ...
Module 1 Reading Requirement <ul><li>Dept. of Defense Joint Staff (2005) Joint Pub 3-26,  Homeland Security,  the Pentagon...
Team Assignment <ul><li>Collectively formulate into team groups of 3 learners. </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare and submit a draf...
Team Assignment <ul><li>Identify three (3) Facts and three (3) Assumptions relating to the problem. </li></ul><ul><li>Cond...
Individual Essay Question <ul><li>Individual Essay Question 1: Do the HS&D principles, and DHS functions outlined in the a...
Individual Essay Question <ul><li>Individual Essay Question: Goss (2006) addresses the challenges that exist between the s...
Please Complete the Blackboard Requirements for This Module Before Moving to Module Two
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Ngs Hsm 700bl Module 1 01272009

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Transcript of "Ngs Hsm 700bl Module 1 01272009"

  1. 1. www.ngs.edu | 800.838.2580
  2. 2. HSM 700v – Principles and Applications in Homeland Security & Defense Course Review This material is protected by United States copyright laws. You must treat this publication like any other proprietary material. No part of this material may be copied, photocopied, reproduced, translated, or reduced to any electronic medium by individuals or organizations outside of the National Graduate School without prior written consent from the National Graduate School. For information, please call 800.838.2580 or visit www.ngs.edu .
  3. 3. Course Description <ul><li>HSM 700v (Virtual) is a Masters course in the National Graduate School curriculum that concentrates on current principles and application of principles relating to the Homeland Security & Defense arena. </li></ul><ul><li>This online course provides an advanced examination and study of HS&D Principles, departmental functions at Federal, State, Local, and Tribal levels, DOD Title 10/32 Functions in support of HSD, State and Local Emergency Preparedness, HS&D and the Private sector, the NSHS Management Model and DHS Performance Framework, HS&D QSM applications, and Inter and Intra-agency Cooperation, Communication, Collaboration and Measuring Success. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Course Description Learners also assemble and present a course project presentation applying all of the principles and applications addressed during the course, presenting their project to the class during the final module .
  5. 5. Course Objectives <ul><li>Learners become familiar with HS&D Principles and Applications of DHS Federal through Tribal level functions, DOD functions in support of HS&D and Civil Authorities and the emphasis on Unified Command and Unity of effort. </li></ul><ul><li>  Learners become familiar with issues facing State and Emergency Preparedness organizations and how to leverage the Private Sector to facilitate HS&D challenges. </li></ul><ul><li>  Learners become familiar with how to utilize and apply HS&D QSM principles and applications such as the HS MGT Model, Benchmarking, Six Sigma Analysis, Metric Development, the Problem Solving Process, and Force Field Analysis to asses, analyze, and measure success to determine a problem or issue solution to a HS&D challenge. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Course Objectives <ul><li>Learners become familiar with fundamentals of HS&D Intra-agency and Inter-agency cooperation, coordination, and communication, and its necessity on facilitating measuring success. </li></ul><ul><li>Learners conduct research and readings focused on Homeland Security principles, doctrine, and current literature to enhance situational understanding of contemporary issues facing Homeland Security leaders and managers. </li></ul><ul><li>Learners conduct a group research project, analyzing a problem or issue in Homeland Security, and utilize HS&D Quality Systems Management approaches to provide a recommended solution to the problem that could be posed and considered by a Homeland Security policy decision maker. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Course Outcomes <ul><li>Learners competent with a thorough understanding of how to utilize research methods, QSM tools and methods, application best practices and to address HS&D challenges. </li></ul><ul><li>Learners conduct weekly collaboration by reading and analyzing classmates’ submissions, providing substantive analytical comments to enhance collective learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Learners utilize and integrate contemporary literature on Homeland Security policies, issues, and doctrine to facilitate research methods and analysis for project completion. </li></ul><ul><li>Learners confident with being able to apply HS&D principles and applications to fundamentally address HS&D issues and challenges. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Required Readings <ul><li>ADDITIONAL LITERARY RESOURCES </li></ul><ul><li>Learners are encouraged to expand their knowledge using the following literary resources to support their individual responses and research: </li></ul><ul><li>  Texas A&M Integrative Center for Homeland Security TEX: Taxonomy for Education and exploration: http://homelandsecurity.tamu.edu/framework. </li></ul><ul><li>  The Naval Post Graduate School Homeland Security Affairs: http://www.hsaj.org/?archive. </li></ul><ul><li>Note that All NGS students have access to the HSDL (Homeland Security Digital Library) available through Naval Post-Grad School. NGS—like A&M—is a “designated university partner” </li></ul>
  9. 9. Required Readings <ul><li>20 Required Readings </li></ul><ul><li>Homeland Security related literature </li></ul><ul><li>Contemporary Issues and Congressional Reports </li></ul><ul><li>Literature supports modular assignments </li></ul><ul><li>Links provided in syllabus or readings posted on Blackboard </li></ul>
  10. 10. Course Evaluation <ul><li>Grades are based on the following course items: </li></ul><ul><li>  1) 50% Team project submission and conference call briefing </li></ul><ul><li> 2) 30% Individual essay questions </li></ul><ul><li> 3) 20% Participation in discussion questions </li></ul><ul><li>  Team Project Submission and Conference Call Briefing: 50% </li></ul><ul><li>Total of 5 assignments in Weeks 1-5 submitted by the team to the Blackboard Digital Drop box. Final Course Project Briefing conducted by each team during the Week 5 course via conference call or web based media. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
  11. 11. Course Evaluation <ul><li>Individual essay questions: 30% </li></ul><ul><li>Individual essay questions are submitted in Weeks 1-5 into Blackboard Digital Dropbox. Each student will read the assigned literary readings and will submit a one- page essay (250-300 words) that answers that week’s Individual Essay Question. </li></ul><ul><li>Participation in discussion questions: 20% </li></ul><ul><li>Based on learner posting of responses to Discussion Questions in Blackboard’s Discussion Board each week, plus comments about other students’ postings. Learners are required to respond to at least one other learner’s response each week. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Course Evaluation <ul><li>Grades are based on the following course items: </li></ul><ul><li>  1) 50% Team project submission and conference call briefing </li></ul><ul><li> 2) 30% Individual essay questions </li></ul><ul><li> 3) 20% Participation in discussion questions </li></ul><ul><li>  Team Project Submission and Conference Call Briefing: 50% </li></ul><ul><li>Total of 5 assignments in Weeks 1-5 submitted by the team to the Blackboard Digital Drop box. Final Course Project Briefing conducted by each team during the Week 5 course via conference call or web based media. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Course Evaluation <ul><li>Individual essay questions: 30% </li></ul><ul><li>Individual essay questions are submitted in Weeks 1-5 into Blackboard Digital Dropbox. Each student will read the assigned literary readings and will submit a one- page essay (250-300 words) that answers that week’s Individual Essay Question. </li></ul><ul><li>Participation in discussion questions: 20% </li></ul><ul><li>Based on learner posting of responses to Discussion Questions in Blackboard’s Discussion Board each week, plus comments about other students’ postings. Learners are required to respond to at least one other learner’s response each week. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Class Participation <ul><li>Evaluated on quality, not quantity. </li></ul><ul><li>Enhances the Course through collaboration, sharing and exchange of ideas and experiences. </li></ul><ul><li>Reinforces the concepts provided from module requirements and literary readings. </li></ul><ul><li>Critical to learning. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Class Participation <ul><li>Weighing of Class Participation: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>5 = Unique comments, superior analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4 = Thoughtful comments, excellent analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3 = Relevant comments, average analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2 = Limited comments, limited analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1 = Redundant or irrelevant comments, poor analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>0 = No participation, absent or no weekly coursework submissions </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Masters Homeland Security Team Project <ul><li>The course project is teamwork oriented. </li></ul><ul><li>The class will be divided into groups of 2-3, and will be required to produce a course project power point briefing, that utilizes literature and readings from this course and from research conducted by students to identify and address a problem in the Homeland Security arena, using HS&D QSM principles and applications, such as Benchmarking, HS&D Six Sigma Analysis, Metrics, the problem solving process, Force Field Analysis model, and the Homeland Security Management Systems Model, to provide a sound recommendation to the problem for policymaker consideration. </li></ul><ul><li>This course project introduces students to the quality systems management approach to Homeland Security and Defense. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Individual Participation <ul><li>Weeks 1-5 </li></ul><ul><li>Individual Weekly Requirement 1: Provide a response of 250-300 words to the weekly module individual assignment essay question posted below, integrating citations and positions of assigned readings and authors. </li></ul><ul><li>Individual Weekly Requirement 2: Provide at substantive response to one or more classmates’ responses. </li></ul>
  18. 18. NGS Policies on Incomplete Grades, Make-up Work, and Attendance <ul><li>NGS fully supports the professional business and military service that help participants gather the practical experience that adds value to their contributions. Any student who is absent for professional or military obligations should make faculty aware with as much notice as possible and take steps to complete assignments which replace in-class participation. Those absent from team assignments must make prior specific arrangements with the team. All make-up work is to be uploaded into the Blackboard Digital Dropbox by the due date or the Instructor’s deadline. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Module Schedule & Topics <ul><li>Module 1: Course Review/HS&D Principles/Applications/DHS Federal, State, Local, Tribal Level Functions, DOD Functions (Title 10/32) in Support of HSD & Civil Authorities </li></ul><ul><li>Module 2: State & Local Emergency Preparedness and Management & HS&D and the Private Sector </li></ul><ul><li>Module 3: DHS Performance Management Framework & the Homeland Security Management System Model and Applications </li></ul>
  20. 20. Module Schedule & Topics <ul><li>Module 4: HS&D Performance Measures & Targets & QSM Applications (Benchmarking, HS&D Six Sigma Analysis, HS&D Metric Development), HS&D Intra-agency Cooperation, Coordination, Communication & Measuring Success </li></ul><ul><li>Module 5: HS&D Principles & Applications: Project Presentations </li></ul>
  21. 21. HSM 700ol Course Endstate <ul><li>HSM 700v end state is achieved with learners completing all assigned readings, module essays and responses, and with class groups completing, submitting, and conducting a formal presentation during the final course module using web based or conference call media. </li></ul>
  22. 22. HSM 700v – Principles and Applications in Homeland Security & Defense Module 1: This material is protected by United States copyright laws. You must treat this publication like any other proprietary material. No part of this material may be copied, photocopied, reproduced, translated, or reduced to any electronic medium by individuals or organizations outside of the National Graduate School without prior written consent from the National Graduate School. For information, please call 800.838.2580 or visit www.ngs.edu . Course Review/HS&D Principles/Applications/DHS Federal, State, Local, Tribal Level Functions, DOD Functions (Title 10/32) in Support of HSD & Civil Authorities
  23. 23. National Homeland Security Strategy Purpose <ul><li>The purpose of our Strategy is to guide, organize, and unify our Nation’s homeland security efforts. It provides a common framework by which our entire Nation should focus its efforts on the following four goals: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Prevent and disrupt terrorist attacks; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Protect the American people, our critical infrastructure, and key resources; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Respond to and recover from incidents that do occur; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Continue to strengthen the foundation to ensure our long-term success. </li></ul></ul>
  24. 24. HS&D Spectrum of Threats
  25. 25. Homeland Security Defined <ul><li>Homeland Security is a concerted national effort to prevent terrorist attacks within the United States, reduce America’s vulnerability to terrorism, and minimize the damage and recover from attacks that do occur. </li></ul>
  26. 26. Homeland Security Vision & Mission <ul><li>Vision </li></ul><ul><li>A secure America, a confident public, and a strong and resilient society and economy. </li></ul><ul><li>Mission </li></ul><ul><li>We will lead the unified national effort to secure America. We will prevent and deter terrorist attacks and protect against and respond to threats and hazards to the Nation. We will secure our national borders while welcoming lawful immigrants, visitors, and trade. </li></ul>
  27. 27. HS&D Strategic Framework <ul><li>The Strategy provides a common framework through which our entire Nation – Federal, State, local, and Tribal governments, the private and non-profit sectors, communities, and individual citizens – should focus its homeland security efforts on the following four goals (2007): </li></ul><ul><li>Prevent and disrupt terrorist attacks.  </li></ul><ul><li>Protect the American people, our critical infrastructure, and key resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Respond to and recover from incidents that do occur.  </li></ul><ul><li>Continue to strengthen the foundation to ensure our long-term success. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.whitehouse.gov/infocus/homeland/ </li></ul>
  28. 28. Homeland Security Core Values <ul><li>Duty: Embodying Integrity, Responsibility, and Accountability. </li></ul><ul><li>We will faithfully execute the duties and responsibilities entrusted to us and maintain the highest ethical and professional standards. We will never forget that, for many, we are the face of America – the first Americans that many visitors will meet. </li></ul><ul><li>Respect: Honoring Our Partners and One Another. </li></ul><ul><li>We will highly value the relationships we build with our customers, partners, stakeholders, and each other. We will honor America’s liberty, democracy, and diversity . </li></ul>
  29. 29. Homeland Security Core Values <ul><li>Innovation: Creating Opportunities. </li></ul><ul><li>We will identify and explore uncharted opportunities to enhance homeland security. We will encourage and recognize our employees’ original thoughts and initiatives and will foster a creative environment in which they can grow, develop, and progress. </li></ul><ul><li>Vigilance: Safeguarding America. </li></ul><ul><li>We shall identify, defeat, and mitigate threats to the safety of the American people. We will constantly guard against threats, hazards, or other dangers that threaten our Nation and our way of life. </li></ul>
  30. 30. Homeland Security Guiding Principles <ul><li>Protect Constitutional Rights and American Values. </li></ul><ul><li>Use an All-Hazards Approach. </li></ul><ul><li>Build Trust through Collaboration and Partnerships. </li></ul><ul><li>Apply Risk Management. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a Culture of Preparedness. </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure Accountability. </li></ul><ul><li>Capitalize on Emerging Technologies. </li></ul><ul><li>Work as an Integrated Response Team. </li></ul><ul><li>Be Flexible. </li></ul>
  31. 31. RAND Homeland Security Basic Principles <ul><li>Security must be defined broadly to include all efforts to deter, detect, prevent, and impede terrorist attacks; mitigate casualties, damage and disruption; reduce alarm; and rapidly respond, repair, and recover. </li></ul><ul><li>Intelligence capabilities must be improved at the local level. </li></ul><ul><li>Re-examine our legal framework for preventive action, which differs from routine reactive criminal investigation. </li></ul><ul><li>Comprehensive oversight and the means for prompt remedy. </li></ul><ul><li>Beware of unwittingly transforming vulnerabilities into imminent terrorist threats. </li></ul>
  32. 32. RAND Homeland Security Basic Principles <ul><li>Security will necessarily be reactive. </li></ul><ul><li>Allocations of resources must be based upon assessments of risk. </li></ul><ul><li>Improve post-disaster recovery. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop security measures that are compatible with our basic freedom. </li></ul><ul><li>Our goals are to deter terrorist attacks, improve our chances of detection, increase the terrorists’ operational difficulties, drive them toward less lucrative targets. </li></ul>
  33. 33. Rand Homeland Security Basic Principles <ul><li>Inculcate a security culture without creating a security-obsessed state. </li></ul><ul><li>Improving our crisis-management capabilities and strengthening our public-health infrastructure are examples. </li></ul><ul><li>Development of capability at the local level rather than the expansion of federal programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Strict cost-benefit analysis will not work. </li></ul><ul><li>Security must be both effective and efficient. </li></ul>
  34. 34. Rand Homeland Security Basic Principles <ul><li>Technology Development: New systems should be rapidly deployed for testing in the field, with successful systems disseminated nationwide. </li></ul><ul><li>Homeland security can be a basis for rebuilding America’s aging infrastructure. </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing public education and participation. </li></ul><ul><li>Create a Civilian Reserve Corps. </li></ul>
  35. 35. Strategic Goal 1: Protect Our Nation from Dangerous People <ul><li>Objective 1.1: Achieve Effective Control of Our Borders. </li></ul><ul><li>Objective 1.2: Protect Our Interior and Enforce Immigration Laws. </li></ul><ul><li>Objective 1.3: Strengthen Screening of Travelers and Workers. </li></ul><ul><li>Objective 1.4: Improve Security through Enhanced Immigration Services. </li></ul>
  36. 36. Select Reported Measures for Goal 1: Protect Our Nation From Dangerous People
  37. 37. Strategic Goal 2: Protect Our Nation from Dangerous Goods <ul><li>Objective 2.1: Prevent and Detect Radiological/Nuclear Attacks. </li></ul><ul><li>Objective 2.2: Prevent, Detect, and Protect Against Biological Attacks. </li></ul><ul><li>Objective 2.3: Prevent and Detect Chemical and Explosive Attacks. </li></ul><ul><li>Objective 2.4: Prevent the Introduction of Illicit Contraband while Facilitating Trade. </li></ul>
  38. 38. Select Reported Measures for Goal 2: Protect Our Nation From Dangerous Goods
  39. 39. Strategic Goal 3: Protect Critical Infrastructure <ul><li>Objective 3.1: Protect and Strengthen the Resilience of the Nation’s Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Objective 3.2: Ensure Continuity of Government Communications and Operations. </li></ul><ul><li>Objective 3.3: Improve Cyber Security. </li></ul><ul><li>Objective 3.4: Protect Transportation Sectors. </li></ul>
  40. 40. Select Reported Measures for Goal 3: Protect Critical Infrastructure
  41. 41. Strategic Goal 4: Strengthen Our Nation's Preparedness and Emergency Response Capabilities <ul><li>Objective 4.1: Ensure Preparedness. </li></ul><ul><li>Objective 4.2: Strengthen Response and Recovery . </li></ul>Select Reported Measures for Goal 4: Strengthen Our Nation’s Preparedness and Emergency Response Capabilities
  42. 42. Strategic Goal 5: Strengthen and Unify DHS Operations and Management <ul><li>Objective 5.1: Improve Department Governance and Performance. </li></ul><ul><li>Objective 5.2: Advance Intelligence and Information Sharing. </li></ul><ul><li>Objective 5.3: Integrate DHS Policy, Planning, and Operations Coordination. </li></ul>Select Reported Measures for Goal 5 : Strengthen and Unify DHS Operations and Management
  43. 43. DHS Performance MGT Framework
  44. 44. Shared Responsibility <ul><li>Homeland security is a shared responsibility built upon a foundation of partnerships. </li></ul><ul><li>Federal, State, local, and Tribal governments, the private and non-profit sectors, communities, and individual citizens all share common goals and responsibilities – as well as accountability – for protecting and defending the Homeland. </li></ul>
  45. 45. Roles and Responsbilities <ul><li>In today’s dynamic threat environment, we must strive for a national response based on engaged partnerships at and across all levels that enable us to anticipate where we should increase or reduce support based on changing circumstances. Success starts with understanding the following fundamental roles: </li></ul><ul><li>Federal Response . The Federal Government maintains a wide array of capabilities and resources that may be made available to States and local governments. Federal assistance is provided when needed to support State and local efforts or lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe within the United States. Accordingly, Federal response efforts are designed to complement and supplement, rather than supplant, the State and local response. The Federal Government also maintains relationships with private and non-profit sector entities to aid in facilitating additional support. </li></ul><ul><li>. </li></ul>
  46. 46. Roles and Responsbilities <ul><li>Private and Non-Profit Sector . The private and non-profit sectors fulfill key roles and work closely with communities, States, and the Federal Government. The private sector plays an essential role implementing plans for the rapid restoration of commercial activities and critical infrastructure operations, which can help mitigate consequences, improve quality of life, and accelerate recovery for communities and the Nation. Non-profit organizations serve a vital role by performing essential services within communities in times of need, such as mass sheltering, emergency food supplies, counseling services, or other vital support services. </li></ul><ul><li>. </li></ul>
  47. 47. Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>State Response . State governments have the primary responsibility for assisting local governments to respond to and recover from disasters and emergencies. When an incident expands to challenge the resources and capabilities of the State coordinate requests for additional support, the State may request support from the private and nonprofit sector, turn to other States for support through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact, or call upon the Federal Government for assistance. States also may collaborate with one another to ensure a broader, more effective regional response. </li></ul>
  48. 48. Roles and Responsibilities <ul><li>Community Response . One of the fundamental response principles is that all incidents should be handled at the lowest jurisdictional level possible. The initial response to the majority of incidents typically is handled by local responders within a single jurisdiction and goes no further. When incidents exceed available resources, the local or Tribal government may rely on mutual aid agreements with nearby localities or request additional support from the State. It is worth noting that for certain types of Federal assistance, Tribal nations work with the State, but, as sovereign entities, they can elect to deal directly with the Federal Government for other types of assistance. </li></ul>
  49. 49. Roles and Responsibilities Special Circumstances. There are special circumstances where the Federal Government exercises a larger, more proactive role. This includes catastrophic incidents when local and State governments require significant support, and incidents where Federal interests are directly implicated, such as those involving primary Federal jurisdiction or authorities. For example, the Federal Government will lead response efforts to render safe weapons of mass destruction and coordinate related activities with State and local partners, as appropriate
  50. 50. State & Local Governments <ul><li>This Strategy defines “State” to mean any State of the United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, or the trust territory of the Pacific Islands. This Strategy also defines “local government” as any county, city, village, town, district, or other political subdivision of any State, and includes any rural community or unincorporated town or village or any other public entity for which an application for assistance is made by a State or political subdivision thereof. </li></ul>
  51. 51. State, Local, Tribal Governments <ul><li>America’s constitutional foundations of federalism and limited government place significant trust and responsibility in the capabilities of State and local governments to help protect the American people. </li></ul><ul><li>State, local, and Tribal governments, which best understand their communities and the unique requirements of their citizens, provide our first response to incidents through law enforcement, fire, public health, and emergency medical services. </li></ul><ul><li>They will always play a prominent, frontline role in helping to prevent terrorist attacks as well as in preparing for and responding to a range of natural and man-made emergencies. </li></ul>
  52. 52. Private & Non Private Sectors <ul><li>The private and non-profit sectors also must be full partners in homeland security. </li></ul><ul><li>As the country’s principal providers of goods and services, and the owners or operators of approximately 85 percent of the Nation’s critical infrastructure, businesses have both an interest in and a responsibility for ensuring their own security. </li></ul><ul><li>The private sector plays key roles in areas as diverse as supply chain security, critical infrastructure protection, and research and development in science, technology, and other innovations that will help secure the Homeland. </li></ul>
  53. 53. Private & Non Private Sectors <ul><li>The non-profit sector, including volunteer and relief groups and faith-based organizations, provides important support services for the Nation, including meals and shelter, counseling, and compassion and comfort to Americans, particularly in the aftermath of an incident. </li></ul>
  54. 54. Our National Challenge
  55. 55. Vision <ul><li>Homeland Security is best accomplished -- </li></ul><ul><ul><li>By building on State and local capabilities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Role of Federal Government </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enhance capabilities at lowest level of government </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Office of Homeland Security (OHS) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Consolidate Federal Activity </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Integrate National preparedness and response system </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Encourage development of State and local capabilities </li></ul></ul></ul>
  56. 56. <ul><li>Homeland Defense. The protection of </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. sovereignty, territory, domestic population, and critical defense infrastructure against external threats and aggression  </li></ul>DOD Pillars of Homeland Security <ul><li>  Civil Support. DOD support to U.S. civil authorities for domestic emergencies and for designated law enforcement and other activities </li></ul><ul><li>  Emergency Preparedness . Those planning activities undertaken to ensure DOD processes, procedures, and resources are in place to support the President and the Secretary of Defense in a designated National Security Emergency </li></ul>
  57. 57. <ul><li>Temporary in Time/Limited in Scope : Assist/train state/local, e.g. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Special Events </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Training First Responders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Support to Law Enforcement </li></ul></ul>Functions <ul><li>In event of national need, DoD will be a front-line actor </li></ul><ul><li>Three broad circumstances: </li></ul><ul><li>Extraordinary : Require DOD-unique capabilities, e.g. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Combat Air Patrols </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>EOD </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Emergency : Augment capabilities of civil authorities , e.g. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Post-event management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Logistics, supply, mobility </li></ul></ul>
  58. 58. Roles Vision <ul><li>Homeland Security is a national activity best accomplished by: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Domestic agencies performing domestic security </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enhancing capabilities at lowest level of government </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Balancing DoD’s ability to defend the nation while adapting to domestic security environment </li></ul></ul>HD Roles and Missions <ul><li>Combat Operations within U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>Surge to meet Crisis </li></ul><ul><li>Post Event Management </li></ul><ul><li>Logistics, Supply, Mobility </li></ul><ul><li>Special Events </li></ul><ul><li>Support to Law enforcement </li></ul>Homeland Defense Civil Support Missions DoD Lead DoD Support DoD Support Temporary Extraordinary Emergency
  59. 59. HD Environment and Response DoD Roles <ul><li>Combat Operations within U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>Surge to meet Crisis </li></ul><ul><li>Post Event Management </li></ul><ul><li>Logistics, Supply, Mobility </li></ul><ul><li>Special Events </li></ul><ul><li>Support to Law enforcement </li></ul><ul><li>Training 1 st Responders </li></ul>DoD Lead DoD Support Temporary Low High Low High Low High Impact on other DoD Missions Consequences of Failure Likelihood Homeland Defense Civil Support Missions Sustaining Activities Emergency Extraordinary
  60. 60. DOD SPT to Homeland Security & Defense <ul><li>HS at the national level has a specific focus on terrorist threats. The DOD focus in supporting HS is broader. </li></ul><ul><li>The Armed Forces of the United States support the NSHS through two distinct but interrelated mission areas — homeland defense (HD) and civil support (CS). </li></ul><ul><li>HD is the protection of US sovereignty, territory, domestic population, and critical infrastructure against external threats and aggression or other threats as directed by the President. </li></ul><ul><li>DOD is responsible for homeland defense, which includes missions such as domestic air defense. </li></ul>
  61. 61. DOD SPT to Homeland Security & Defense <ul><li>DOD recognizes that threats planned or inspired by &quot;external&quot; actors may materialize internally. </li></ul><ul><li>DOD is prepared to conduct homeland defense missions whenever the President, exercising his constitutional authority as Commander in Chief, authorizes military actions. </li></ul><ul><li>For Homeland Defense missions, as directed by the President of the United States and/or the Secretary of Defense (SecDef), DOD is the lead or primary agency. </li></ul>
  62. 62. DOD SPT to Homeland Security & Defense <ul><li>DOD’s role in the CS mission area consists of support to US civil authorities for domestic emergencies, and for designated law enforcement within the scope of restrictions required by the Posse Comitatus Act and other support approved by the SecDef. </li></ul><ul><li>The SecDef provides military assistance to US civil authorities for domestic incidents as directed by the President and consistent with military readiness, Department of Defense directives, and the law. </li></ul>
  63. 63. DOD Homeland Security Framework <ul><li>DOD “prepares and responds” when conducting both HD and CS. </li></ul><ul><li>DOD primarily focuses on “detect, deter, preempt, and defend” when they conduct HD missions. </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare. Emergency preparedness is a shared responsibility and a partnership that includes the Federal government, state and local agencies, the private sector, and individual citizens. </li></ul>
  64. 64. DOD Homeland Security Framework <ul><li>DOD “prepares and responds” when conducting both HD and CS. </li></ul><ul><li>DOD primarily focuses on “detect, deter, preempt, and defend” when they conduct HD missions. </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare. Emergency preparedness is a shared responsibility and a partnership that includes the Federal government, state and local agencies, the private sector, and individual citizens. </li></ul>
  65. 65. DOD Homeland Security Framework <ul><li>Preempt. Preemption consists of proactive measures taken to prevent or neutralize a perceived or imminent attack. Preemption may include offensive actions such as air strikes, maritime interception, or direct action </li></ul><ul><li>Defend. HD missions are those that protect the Nation’s sovereignty. </li></ul><ul><li>Respond. Response, as it relates to HS activities, spans both HD and CS mission areas. </li></ul>
  66. 66. Command Relationships <ul><li>Regardless of whether DOD is conducting HD or CS, military forces will always remain under the control of the established Title 10, 32, or state active duty military chain of command. </li></ul><ul><li>For HD missions, DOD is in the lead with other federal agencies in support. </li></ul><ul><li>In certain circumstances, military commanders or responsible officials in other DOD components may be faced with situations that will require them to provide immediate response to civil authorities. </li></ul><ul><li>Commander, United States Northern Command (CDRUSNORTHCOM) has specific responsibilities for HD and for supporting civil authorities. </li></ul>
  67. 67. DOD HS&D & Civil Support Paradigm
  68. 68. Paradigm Overlapping Transitions
  69. 69. HS&D Seam Environments
  70. 70. HD & CS Campaign Framework
  71. 71. US NORTHCOM Strategic Construct Homeland Defense Tasks <ul><li>DOD retains core defense missions while supporting lead federal agencies </li></ul><ul><li>Includes missions such as : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Aerospace Defense </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Maritime Security </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Critical Infrastructure Protection </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consequence Management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Military Assistance to Civil Authorities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Essential tasks : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Inner zone / rear-area defense </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Support First Responders and other Federal, State, Local government agencies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide unique capabilities to civil authorities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assume freedom of action in the middle and forward zones </li></ul></ul>
  72. 72. Lead Federal Agency/DOD Relationships
  73. 73. Homeland Defense <ul><li>The protection of US sovereignty, territory, domestic population, and critical defense infrastructure against external threats and aggression, or other threats as directed by the President. The Department of Defense is responsible for HD. (Strategy for Homeland Defense and Civil Support) </li></ul>
  74. 74. Homeland Defense & Civil Support Operational Framework
  75. 75. Homeland Defense <ul><li>DOD is the lead, supported by other agencies, in defending against traditional external threats/aggression (e.g., air and missile attack). </li></ul><ul><li>However, against internal asymmetric, nontraditional threats (e.g., terrorism), DOD may be in support of DHS. </li></ul><ul><li>When ordered to conduct HD operations within US territory, DOD will coordinate closely with other federal agencies or departments. </li></ul>
  76. 76. Homeland Defense <ul><li>DOD is the lead, supported by other agencies, in defending against traditional external threats/aggression (e.g., air and missile attack). </li></ul><ul><li>However, against internal asymmetric, nontraditional threats (e.g., terrorism), DOD may be in support of DHS. </li></ul><ul><li>When ordered to conduct HD operations within US territory, DOD will coordinate closely with other federal agencies or departments. </li></ul>
  77. 77. Homeland Defense Missions and Operational Elements
  78. 78. Civil Support <ul><li>Employment of military forces within the US, its territories, and possessions, under the auspices of CS, typically falls under the broad mission of MACA. </li></ul><ul><li>Military Support to Civil Authorities. </li></ul><ul><li>MSCA refers to support provided by Federal military forces, DOD civilians, contractor personnel, and DOD agencies and components in response to requests for assistance during domestic incidents to include terrorist threats or attacks, major disasters, and other emergencies. MSCA missions consist of DOD support to US domestic emergencies and for designated law enforcement, civil disturbances, and other activities. </li></ul>
  79. 79. Military Support to Civil Authorities
  80. 80. Civil Support <ul><li>Military Support to Civilian Law Enforcement Agencies. </li></ul><ul><li>Military forces performing in this role support the lead Federal agency and other supporting agencies and may be armed depending on the SecDef decision. Military support to civilian law enforcement agencies (LEAs) may include, but is not limited to national special security events, support for combating terrorism, support to counterdrug operations, maritime security, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities, and general support (training support to LEAs/loan of equipment/personnel and expert advice). </li></ul>
  81. 81. Civil Support <ul><li>Military Assistance for Civil Disturbances. </li></ul><ul><li>The President is authorized by the Constitution and statutory laws to employ the Armed Forces of the United States to suppress insurrections, rebellions, and riots, and provide federal supplemental assistance to the states to maintain law and order. Responsibility for the management of federal response for civil disturbances rests with the Attorney General. </li></ul>
  82. 82. Military Assistance for Civil Disturbance Operations
  83. 83. Reserve Component Support to HS & D <ul><li>Reserve Component Forces. NG and Reserve forces are collectively referred to as RC forces and are integral to the accomplishment of peacetime missions and conflict prevention. </li></ul><ul><li>RC Forces are also an essential part of the HS operational force and consist of the Army National Guard (ARNG), the US Army Reserve (USAR), the US Naval Reserve (USNR), the US Marine Corps Reserve (USMCR), the ANG, the US Air Force Reserve (USAFR), and the US Coast Guard Reserve (USCGR). </li></ul><ul><li>Guidelines for the utilization of RC forces when called to active duty are found in Title 10 United States Code (USC). </li></ul>
  84. 84. Reserve Component Support to HS & D <ul><li>National Guard. The NG primarily operates under three different command relationships: federal funding and federal control (10 USC); federal funding and state control (32 USC); and state status (state funding and state control). </li></ul><ul><li>The NG, when in state status, is normally the first military responder to CS incidents that require resources beyond the capabilities of local and other state-level emergency response organizations. </li></ul>
  85. 85. Reserve Component Support to HS & D <ul><li>National Guard Weapons of Mass Destruction – Civil Support Teams (WMD-CSTs). The NG, operating under 32 USC or state status, is likely to be the first military responder to a CBRNE incident site or area. The WMD-CST’s mission is to support civil authorities at a domestic CBRNE incident site by identifying CBRNE agents/substances, assessing current and projected consequences, advising on response measures, and assisting with appropriate requests for additional support. </li></ul>
  86. 86. Module 1 Reading Requirement <ul><li>Instructor’s Module/Week 1 PPT presentation. </li></ul><ul><li>Kamien, D. (2006) the McGraw-Hill Homeland Security Handbook . McGraw-Hill Publishing. New York, N.Y. Chapter 16, p. 225-262, Chapter 18, p. 283-296. </li></ul><ul><li>Homeland Security Council (2007), National Homeland Security Strategy (October, 2007), the White House . Washington D.C., Retrieved from website: http://www.whitehouse.gov/infocus/homeland, p. 1-23. </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. Department of Homeland Security (2008), Strategic Plan Fiscal Years 2008–2013: One Team, One Mission, Securing Our Homeland , Washington D. C. </li></ul>
  87. 87. Module 1 Reading Requirement <ul><li>U.S. Department of Homeland Security (2008), Strategic Plan Fiscal Years 2008–2013: One Team, One Mission, Securing Our Homeland , Washington D. C. </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. Department of Homeland Security (2007), Fact Sheet for NSHS, The White House . Washington D.C., Retrieved from website: http://www.whitehouse.gov/infocus/homeland/ </li></ul><ul><li>Jenkins, B. (2007), Basic Principles for Homeland Security. Rand Corporation: Testimony presented before the House Appropriations Committee, Subcommittee on Homeland Security on January 30, 2007 . Arlington, VA. </li></ul>
  88. 88. Module 1 Reading Requirement <ul><li>Dept. of Defense Joint Staff (2005) Joint Pub 3-26, Homeland Security, the Pentagon, Washington D.C. </li></ul><ul><li>Goss, T. (2006) Who’s in Charge? New Challenges in Homeland Defense and Homeland Security , Homeland Security Affairs Vol. II Issue 1, Article 2. </li></ul>
  89. 89. Team Assignment <ul><li>Collectively formulate into team groups of 3 learners. </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare and submit a draft PPT slide that identifies the Project Problem Topic and Statement. Receive in-class instructor approval of Project Topic and Statement. </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare and submit the Project cover slide and slide 1 (Project Statement) into Blackboard Digital Drop Box. </li></ul>
  90. 90. Team Assignment <ul><li>Identify three (3) Facts and three (3) Assumptions relating to the problem. </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct Force Field Analysis on the problem. </li></ul><ul><li>Produce and submit PPT slides 2 (Facts & Assumptions) & 3 (FFA) and submit into Blackboard Digital Drop Box. </li></ul>
  91. 91. Individual Essay Question <ul><li>Individual Essay Question 1: Do the HS&D principles, and DHS functions outlined in the assigned readings, provide a sound doctrinal basis and framework to support DHS strategy and policy execution at the national, state, local and tribal levels? Support, justify, and defend your position using citations from these modules readings. </li></ul>
  92. 92. Individual Essay Question <ul><li>Individual Essay Question: Goss (2006) addresses the challenges that exist between the sharing of responsibility, command and control, and Title 10 and 32 overlapping between DOD and Civil authorities. Should DOD be given a greater authoritarian role, or should Civil Authorities and agencies expand their capabilities to provide a greater domestic role in HS&D? </li></ul>
  93. 93. Please Complete the Blackboard Requirements for This Module Before Moving to Module Two
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