Could online market places tackle poverty?

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This is a try at summarising the article by Wingham Rowan (of Slivers of Time) for the purpose of asking the question - and triggering a discussion - at the #ScoGovCamp on 31 July 2010

This is a try at summarising the article by Wingham Rowan (of Slivers of Time) for the purpose of asking the question - and triggering a discussion - at the #ScoGovCamp on 31 July 2010

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  • 1. Could online market places tackle poverty? With thanks to Wingham Rowan ( Slivers of Time ) http:// www.jrf.org.uk /publications/online-marketplaces-poverty
  • 2. Market places
  • 3. What’s involved in being involved?
    • Transactions
      • Friction (not)
      • Disintermediation(!)
    • Reviews & feedback
    • Reputation
    • Trust
      • Security (financial & other)
      • indemnity
    • Identity
      • registration
  • 4. Asset types
    • Small personal trades
    • Formal work
      • Particularly for sporadic, irregular hours
    • Local services
      • Trade direct rather than through agencies?
    • Hire of Goods
      • For when you’re not using your hoover yourself
    • Borrowing cash
      • Like existing micro-finance operations
  • 5. UK Scale
    • Est. £100m/day untraded resources
    • 20% of adults deemed economically inactive (8.5m?!)
  • 6. What might gov’t do?
    • not fund, design, build or operate such marketplaces
    • be a catalyst
      • This cd also incl channeling purchasing via e-markets
    • provide a regulatory framework & access to validation procedures
    • divert public spending to local communities through the new markets,
  • 7. Being a catalyst
    • e.g. The1993 National Lottery Act defined:
    • parameters of the intended service;
    • For operators
      • the benefits and protections government would bestow
      • Corresponding obligations
    • duration of the concession
    • the process by which a winning consortium of operators would be decided.
  • 8. 5 core principles
    • Gov’t sponsorship not management
    • Transparent process of set-up and operation
    • Focus on small transactions
    • Don’t micro-manage
    • Apply monopolies regulations
  • 9. How would it work?
    • Making a transaction – see next slide
    • Tracking the market – next slide but one
  • 10. transaction
  • 11. Tracking a market
  • 12. Advanced functions
    • Complementary economy
      • Like LETS
    • Resource gaps analysis
      • “is there a shortage of electricians in Perth?...”
    • Enabling investment in sellers
      • Training scenario
    • Interlocking markets
      • Stitching a package together from different domains
  • 13. Where might demand come from?
    • Currently non-existent markets
      • E.g. time-specific renting stuff out
    • Markets made more convenient
      • Regulated, stable, low-cost?
    • Supporting markets
      • E.g. rental mkt creates demand for ‘holders’
    • Corporates displaced
      • Disintermediation; grocer’s bicycle e.g.
  • 14. Challenges
    • Include:
    • the world of work
      • DWP
        • Rather ‘Black & white’ view of being in/out of work
        • Shades of grey?
      • Casualised labour (remember what it was that ppl worked so hard to combat)
    • Identity infrastructure
    • Digital access
    • First mover advantage
  • 15. Some helpful contexts
    • Grameen Bank & Glasgow Caley?
    • Shifting the Balance of Care
      • Personalised care pilots
      • Timebanks
    • SiteonMobile?
      • Technical solution for lack of web access
  • 16. Good things for Gov’t
    • a new tool for tackling worklessness?
    • more precise public services?
    • a new model for skills?
    • benefits efficiencies?