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Biometric Sensors

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  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 PDA = Personal Digital Assistant
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 For example, a system for physical access control has been used at the Olympic Games in Atlanta. fingerprint recognition has been used in forensic applications since early 20 th century. ID cards based on fingerprint recognition are used in Brunei.
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 AFIS = Automated Fingerprint Identification System
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 The sensors by DELSY and Infineon are chip-based. A picture of an ultrasound fingerprint sensor [by UltraScan] was not available.
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 The sensor by Authentec is chip-based.
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 BioMouse ™ Plus: integrated smartcard reader and fingerprint sensor ID Mouse: mouse with fingerprint sensor
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 Cherry keyboard: with integrated smartcard reader and fingerprint sensor
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 Sensors are standard off-the-shelf cameras. Therefore, the price of a face recognition system is determined solely by the software. This makes face recognition quite cost effective. TrueFace Engine: feedback for focussing the face on PC monitor One-to-One ™: feedback for focussing the face using mirrored camera
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 IrisScan: In an active system, the user has to focus the iris into the corresponding frame (displayed on the computer monitor) him/herself. Sensar: In a passive system, the sensor focusses the biometric feature itself.
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 To our knowledge, there is only one manufacturer of retinal recognition systems.
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 Hand geometry reading has been used at the Olympic Games in Atlanta to monitor access to the Olympic village.
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 The pen measures pressure and tilt.
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 The sensors are incorporated into the tablet.
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 „ increase the level of security achieved by the system“ by using two or more biometric methods in conjunction. „ enlarge the user base“ by giving the user an alternative.
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 Reliability: Some sensors are more vulnerable than others. Security: The error rates of different biometric technologies vary a lot. For example, iris recognition systems have an error rate in the order of 1 in 1 million users, fingerprint recognition systems have an error rate in the order of 1 in 1000 to 1 in 10000 and speaker recognition systems or dynamic signature verification systems have an error rate in the order of 1 in 100. Cost: Some biometric methods do not require specific sensor technology, for example speaker recognition, face recognition and keystroke dynamics, whereas other require sophisticated sensor technology. Hence, the costs vary a lot. User acceptance: For example, retinal recognition systems have a very low user acceptance, whereas others, like dynamic signature verification, face recognition, and speaker recognition are widely accepted. Life detection: Life detection is a very important feature of any biometric system. There are biometric technologies where life detection is not satisfactory (e.g. speaker recognition). Users that are unsuitable: For every biometric technology, there is a small ratio of users for whom the biometric method does not work, e.g. fingerprint recognition cannot be used when a person has lost both arms. Size of sensor: Fingerprint sensors are very small and can be incorporated even into small devices. Hand geometry readers, on the other, would not be suitable for e.g. mobile applications.
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 [ http://www.itu.int/itudoc/itu-t/workshop/security/present/s5p4.pdf ] [Mat02] Matsumoto, H. Matsumoto, K. Yamada, S. Hoshino, "Impact of Artificial Gummy Fingers on Fingerprint Systems," Proceedings of SPIE Vol. #4677, Optical Security and Counterfeit Deterrence Techniques IV, 2002.
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 Face recognition system (biometric data unprotected on hard disk) – Biometric reference data downloaded onto laptop and displayed on screen. The face recognition system accepts the displayed picture. Attacker creates new biometric reference data and loads it into the face recognition database. The face recognition system accepts the attacker as legitimate user. Fingerprint recognition – Breathe onto sensor or apply water-filled plastic bag or apply graphite powder and a piece of tape to reactivate latent fingerprints (for capacitive sensors) Use graphite powder technique plus bright light to reactivate latent fingerprints (for optical fingerprint sensors) Use latex finger (for thermal sensors)
  • page „ State of the Art in Biometrics“ S. Schwiderski-Grosche 14/10/2002 Links and documents: Scheuermann, D., Schwiderski-Grosche, S. und Struif, B., Usability of Biometrics in Relation to Electronic Signatures , EU Studie 502533/8, http://www.sit.fraunhofer.de/cgi-bin/sit-frame/sica?link=/SICA/projects/bio_sig.html. Jain, A., Bolle, R. und Pankanti, S., Biometrics: Personal Identification in Networked Society , Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999. International Biometric Group: http:// www.biometricgroup.com The Biometric Consortium: http://www.biometrics.org/ Association for Biometrics: http://www.afb.org.uk/ BioAPI Consortium: http://www.bioapi.org/ International Biometric Industry Association: http://www.ibia.org/
  • Transcript

    • 1. Biometrics SensorsSubmitted by:- Sukhdeep Singh Sidhu Roll No. :- 115363 Branch:- CSE N2
    • 2.  Authentication – the process of verifying that a user requesting a network resource is who he, she, or it claims to be, and vice versa. Conventional authentication methods › „something that you have“ – key, magnetic card or smartcard › „something that you know“ – PIN or password Biometric authentication uses personal features › „something that you are“
    • 3. Contents Application domains for biometric products Biometric products  Fingerprint recognition  Face recognition  Iris recognition  Retinal recognition  Hand geometry measurement  Dynamic signature verification How good are biometric products today? Conclusions
    • 4.  Access control › to devices  cellular phones  logging into a computer, laptop, or PDA  cars  guns › to local services  debitting money from a cash dispenser  logging in to computer  accessing data on smartcard › to remote services  e-commerce  e-business
    • 5.  Physical access control › to high security areas › to public buildings or areas Time & attendance control Identification › forensic person investigation › social services applications, e.g. immigration or prevention of welfare fraud › personal documents, e.g. electronic drivers license or ID card
    • 6.  Sensors › optical sensors › ultrasound sensors › chip-based sensors › thermal sensors Integrated products › for identification – AFIS systems › for verification
    • 7. Electro-optical sensor [DELSY® CMOS sensor modul] Optical fingerprint sensor[Fingerprint Identification Unit FIU-001/500 by Sony] Capacitive sensor [FingerTIP™ by Infineon]
    • 8. Thermal sensor [FingerChip™ by ATMEL (was: Thomson CSF)] E-Field Sensor[FingerLoc™ by Authentec]
    • 9. [BioMouse™ Plus by American Biometric Company]Physical Access Control System [BioGate Tower by Bergdata] [ID Mouse by Siemens]
    • 10. Keyboard [G 81-12000 by Cherry] System including[TravelMate 740 by Compaq und Acer] fingerprint sensor, smartcard reader and display by DELSY
    • 11. Face recognition system[TrueFace Engine by Miros] Face recognition system [O n e -t o -O n e ™ b y B io m e t r ic Ac c e s s C o r p o r a t io n ]
    • 12. S y s t e m f o r p a s s iv e ir is r e c o g n it io n b y S e n s a rS y s t e m f o r a c t iv e ir isr e c o g n it io n b y Ir is S c a n
    • 13. Retinal recognition system [Icam 2001 by Eyedentify]
    • 14. Hand geometry reader by Recognition Systems Hand geometry reader fortwo finger recognition by BioMet Partners
    • 15. Electronic pen [LCI-SmartPen]
    • 16. Digitising tablet by Digitising tablet [Hesy Signature PadWacom Technologies by BS Biometric Systems GmbH]
    • 17.  Combination of biometric technologies › Fingerprint and face recognition › Face recognition and lip movement › Fingerprint recognition and dynamic signature verification increase the level of security achieved by the system enlarge the user base
    • 18.  depends on the application  reliability  security  performance  cost  user acceptance  life detection  users that are unsuitable  size of sensor
    • 19.  How can we find out, how good a biometric product is? › Empirical tests of the product In the past year, there were two independent test series of biometric products › in Japan › in Germany
    • 20. 1. Regular biometric sensor using artificially generated biometric data3. Replay attack of eavesdropped biometric data5. Manipulation of stored biometric reference data
    • 21.  Tsutomu Matsumoto, a Japanese cryptographer working at Yokohama National University 11 state-of-the-art fingerprint sensors 2 different processes to make gummy fingers › from live finger › from latent fingerprint Gummy fingers fooled fingerprint sensors 80% of the time
    • 22.  Computer magazine c’t 11 biometric sensors › 9 fingerprint sensors, › 1 face recognition system, and › 1 iris scanner Fingerprint sensors – › reactivate latent fingerprints (optical and capacitive sensors) › apply latex finger (thermal sensor) Face recognition system – › down- (up-) load biometric reference data from (to) hard disk › no or only weak life detection
    • 23.  Iris recognition – › picture of iris of enrolled person with cut-out pupil, where a real pupil is displayed All tested biometric systems could be fooled, but the effort differed considerably
    • 24.  Biometric technology has great potential There are many biometric products around, regarding the different biometric technologies Shortcomings of biometric systems due to › manufacturers ignorance of security concerns › lack of quality control › standardisation problems Biometric technology is very promising Manufacturers have to take security concerns serious