Wine as a tradeable commodity ppt
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  • 1. Wine as a TRADEABLE COMMODITY WINE AS A TRADEABLE COMMODITY Pariwesh Kumar
  • 2.
    • “ Despite all the Genetic Engineering of our food these days WINE remains Deeply Connected with its Land.”
    • - Robert Mondavi
    • (Californian vintner)
  • 3.
    • Wine has always been a tradable commodity, trade came in existence from the beginning of 1600 B.C.
    • Greeks are considered as the first producers of various wines as well as the first traders.
    • Greek wines could be found in location as diverse as France, Ezypt, around the Black sea and in the Denube region.
  • 4.
    • Ancient Greek wine trade
  • 5.
    • A large bulke of wine carried along the Mediterranean coasts by the means of wrecked ships.
    • One ship generally carried 6-7 gallon earth ware jars that would have contained as much as 66,000gallons of wines.
    • Per year trade through the port ‘ MERSEILLES’ was about 2.2 million gallons.
  • 6.
    • From the fifth century Europe was developing as the biggest hub for wine trading as consumption was increasing vigorously
    • It was considered as the golden era for wine trade
    • The wine was deeply involved in all social and religious aspects, ritual use of wine was an important consideration of its trade development.
  • 7.  
  • 8.
    • Wine trade was growing to Southern and Eastern England, the low countries and Scandinavia.
    • By the early stages of twelfth century there was a huge development of large scale trades in both luxury and low status goods in Gascony, Northern France and the Rhine valley.
    • In the coming years england was the biggest consumer of wines..infact they became wine dependent, it encourages the wine trade and production in europe.
  • 9.  
  • 10.
    • Seventeenth century came with involvement of politics into the wine trade. It changes the form of trade and due to political conflicts between England and France, England discovered a great love for ‘Port’.
    • Exploration, conquest and settlement brought wine to Mexico, Argentina and South Africa.
    • Now the wine has penetrated almost all part of world.
  • 11.  
  • 12.  
  • 13. Wine trade was not only involved with cash flow
    • Wine trade not only brought wine from Greek but they carried Greek culture and civilization as they were indifferent part of wines.
    • Romans shown a great interest in the greek way of living and their love for vitiviniculture ; resulted in their major contributions in classifying varieties, colours, observing and charting ripening characteristics, identifying diseases and recognizing soil type preferences.
    • Roman sociatiy got major changes in the way of living, wine trade had shown significant effects on their religious and cultural beliefs.
  • 14.
    • Education system accepted the winiculture as a specific part of.
    • Monasteries played a vital role in expanding the wine science to grater extents. They were the forefront in developing new techniques in vitiviniculture.
  • 15.
    • European writers paid attention to the quality of wines. They gave particular value to colour, body and sweetness.
    • In the very first century Pliny provided a catalogue of wines included ninety one varieties of vine, fifty kinds of quality wines and thirty eight varieties of foreign wines
    • Simultaneously medical beliefs also came in the existence .
    • Served as relevant for Gastric and Eurological problems .
    • Cato recommended its effectiveness for constipation,snakebite,got,in
  • 16. Medical beliefs
    • Simultaneously medical beliefs also came in the existence .
    • Served as relevant for Gastric and Urological problems .
    • Cato recommended its effectiveness for constipation ,snakebite, got, indigestion and even Diarrhea.
  • 17. barrel Maturation and ageing
    • Initially amphorae and wooden barrels used for wine trade and transportation
    • Discovery of wooden barrels as a best ageing equipment changed the wine trading.
    • Wine was not only treated as tradable commodity but as a better mode of long term investment.
  • 18. REFERENCES
    • Topic: WINE AS A TEADEABLE COMMODITY
    •  
    • REFERENCES
    •  
    • Jhonson, Hugh.(1998). Wine companion. London:Michell Beazley
    • Jhonson, Hugh.
    • Michael Hall, C.,Sharples, Liz, Cambourne, Brook, Macionis, Niki( ). Wine tourism around the world:
    •  
    • 101 Wine history.mht professional friend of wine.Retrived July29,2010,from http://www.answers.com
    • Wine from classical time to the 19 th century.Retrived July29,2010, from
    • Medieval wine trade.Retrived July30,2010,from www.amajon.com
    • All about Greek wines.RetrivedAugust 1,2010,from http://www.wikipedia.com
    • Greek wine history:Ancient Greek .Retrived August 1,2010,from http://www.unrv.com
    • History of French wines,Retrived August2,from http://www.thewinedoctor.com
    •  
    • Some other wabesites I have used are
    • www.decanter.com
    • www.winespectator.com
    • www.cuisine.com
    • www.winetitles.com.au
    • www.greekwinemakers.com
    •