Personal Network Management Km Forum Oct 2009

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Presentation to the Boston KM Forum. Describes how an understanding of networks dynamic and structure can help with the development of one's personal network.

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  • Abstract as advertised:The locus of knowledge has shifted over the past 15 years of “KM” – from being in “stuff” (artifacts, content management systems), to being in people (communities of practice, collaboration systems), to being in the network (constantly alive and moving around us, available directly and peripherally from our friends, colleagues, co-workers, and those we following on Twitter).  How we maintain and grow our personal networks – our personal net work – is a critical part of “personal knowledge management.”  Patti will put personal networks in context and then review practical techniques for maintaining personal networks.
  • Before talking about personal networks and knowledge management, I need to share my personal perspectives and on both of these so you can understand my language.
  • http://www.statemaster.com/encyclopedia/AnimalIn my book, Net Work, I describe a framework for thinking about and talking about networks. I actually have four primary elements in the framework, Purpose, Structure, Style, and Value – but I’m going to hold off on the value part until we get into the personal knowledge network management.
  • In one sense I’ve been interested in and creating networks throughout my career, but it wasn’t’ until I was introduced to science of network in the fall of 2000 that may things started to click with me. The fact that there is a tool that lets us map the relationships among people is not novel, but the research that is coming forward that tells us how the structure of a network can predict outcomes and behaviors, that is what is revolutionary. That is what is changing our thinking.
  • Personal networks – place is “home”, space is physical space, the pace is holidays, birthdays, and interaction is always in person.Great quote from MichaelShrage, in his book Shared Minds“Two individuals create a set of shared experiences and understandings that are unique to them. They build contexts.”
  • So why is Net Work important? Let’s look at the business case…
  • This is only one set of research. Rob Cross and his colleagues doing research at UVA have come up with many case studies that show improved performance, improved social capital of people who pay attention to their networks. I like this Ron Burt/Don Ronchi of Raytheon study because it had a control group.
  • There are many views of the evolution of knowledge management, but since I first put this out there in 2005, I haven’t much changed my view, so let’s go with this one. I leave it to you to determine whether the third generation is KM 2.0 as it is being called now. (It doesn’t much matter, except that those who thought that KM was dead were greatly cheered by a recent blog posting by French Caldwell of Gartner, who ways that it’s time for KM to come out of the closet. He really has been sitting in on Boston KM Forum meetings – or similar groups around the world, if he thinks it’s really in the closet, or maybe we have all been in the closet.)It is important to mention that when we move from one generation to another we don’t lose what we accumulated as skills, or collected as content, but that we augment an existing tool set. Dave Pollard has used the phrase from content and collection to context and connectionWhich is also quite apt. This context piece turns out to be very important as we shift from a corporate environment to a networked environment. Data  information knowledge, but only when it has context.Speaking of context, what are we to make of this new place, where “knowledge lives?”
  • “Everything is fragmented” says Dave Weinberger, and right he is. I don’t know about you, but I leave pieces of myself and what I’m thinking about and collecting all over the place. What Dave, and others who are at the front wave of social media research, are onto is that in this new place, everything hinges on discoverability.If it’s out there, and those who created it made sufficient tracks to enable others to find it, we can find it and put it together in a way that makes sense for us.Meanwhile, it’s just way too much. So what do we do? We rely on our personal networks.
  • http://www.freeplaynetwork.org.uk/playlink/exhibition/Earlier, I said that we can generally identify a network as having a particular core purpose. We participate in these as individuals, and people in these networks make up our personal network. When work is fun, some of those people whom we know from work become our closest personal friends. (I had lunch yesterday with 2 friends I worked with at Digital. We’ve been having lunch together for over 30 years. These are good friends, and we now we just play together.)Now I am going to launch into how we maintain our personal networks in the age of digital networks, but I don’t want to leave you thinking that what I am going to talk about applies only to work networks.
  • This is just to make the point that as I talk about how we sustain our networks in cyberspace, I am not overlooking families and personal friends. Social media is not just for geeks and social media mavens!This web site was started by a distant cousin in Denmark, who had located our Wisconsin clan sleuthing out genealogy charts … 10 years ago.Note the title – The Christiansen Family Focus. This was the title of a newsletter done on paper that my cousin Jeanne had written over the course of four years in the mid 1980s. Jeanne remains one of the key stewards of this community, making sure that the front page always has something seasonal… I love this pic of my niece Sarah, which was first posted in 2004. We have an incredible archive. And we have fun – sometimes it gets a bit thick when politics come into the picture (we have some of the bluest blue and reddest red folks on this family tree) but it all keeps working.
  • I want to focus the rest of this talk on the overlap of our personal networks and our learning networks. Learning/idea networks are those that I know all the people in this room value. You wouldn’t be here if it didn’t’ make sense to you to occasionally be in the same room with, and here the experiences of, other people who are in the process of improving their own skills and abilities in the area of knowledge management.So, there are a lot of ways to tap into learning networks… but the question is, how do you bring into consciousness how you work with those networks? This what I’m trying to get at when I conflate knowledge management with Personal Net Work.
  • I want to focus the rest of this talk on the overlap of our personal networks and our learning networks. Learning/idea networks are those that I know all the people in this room value. You wouldn’t be here if it didn’t’ make sense to you to occasionally be in the same room with, and here the experiences of, other people who are in the process of improving their own skills and abilities in the area of knowledge management.So, there are a lot of ways to tap into learning networks… but the question is, how do you bring into consciousness how you work with those networks? This what I’m trying to get at when I conflate knowledge management with Personal Net Work.
  • http://www.statemaster.com/encyclopedia/Animal
  • This is one of the key points from the research of Rob Cross and others on networks of high performers as well as the ingredients for successful innovation networks. Innovation happens when new ideas rub off on each other, and if we spend all of our time talking to people who are already like us, and think the same way by virtue of one or more shared demographics, then we won’t learn anything new.However, if we put enough diversity into our networks, we are (as Ron Burt says) “at risk of new ideas”. If your work demands – or if you demand of yourself – that you will be constantly challenged with alternate viewpoints and have access to new game-changing findings, then you need to have a diverse network.One of the most important here is expertise – especially in this day and age, you need to be able to tap into specialized expertise of other people. You can’t do it all alone. And you also need to be able to distinguish yourself. I’ll bring this up again later.How can you tell about your network? Well, some of it gets back to looking at structure. Remember the network map I showed earlier? We can look at a network map and pull out the personal networks of individuals in it.
  • Here, we see two people in this network – AB and DC. You can sort of tell from the whole map that AB is much better positioned than DC. He’s between a number of networks and has access to ideas from the other functions represented in this organization. He’s not only likely to be a broker, but also likely to spot new ideas from other groups.DC, on the other hand, has a network that is pretty much focused on others in his own group. It’s a very well-knit group, which is a good structure for completing team tasks, but not so good for getting outside ideas. It’s a good thing that DC has another thing going for him – he’s connected to AB.
  • How can you tell this about yourself? If you are in facebook, you can use the Touchgraph application. It’s not scientific, but it can show you patterns. The big thing about social network analysis is the ability to see and spot patterns. Facebook can show you your friends by network and also by geography. So my biggest cluster here is the Boston area and then I have my MITRE friends up there in a cluster…. And then more distant friends, kind of outside. Australia, New York, Seattle, Vancouver, Europe, and so on. My family is in here, too and many friends. It’s distributed, but probably not as much as I would like it to be… if I wanted, for example, to do some work in Europe or Australia. This also doesn’t show what is probably most important from a KM and career perspective – it doesn’t show what the skill sets and expertise are of the people in my network. I’d need a more sophisticated analysis for that (which I could do, if I had the time and the detail were important), but just being able to scan a map like this shows me the current state of my Facebook network (alas, it doesn’t include Twitter!)
  • http://www.treehugger.com/US-bike-sharing-program-denver.jpgThis is the new form of the golden rule. But it really is true out here in cyberspace, the more you share, the more you get back. This is a lesson being learned by companies who have embraced the open source model.The other key concept here is the notion of generalized reciprocity, also referred to by Wayne Baker, as the network of reciprocity. He says: “Acts of contribution, big and small, build your fund of social capital, creating a vast network of reciprocity. A network of reciprocity reaches far and wide. And so those who help you may not be those you help. The help you receive may come from the distant corners of the network; it may come unbidden and unasked for… “the dance of Shiva,” All that is best for us comes of itself into our hands—but if we strive to overtake it, it perpetually eludes us.”
  • When I was writing Net Work, I looked for a word or metaphor I could use to encompass this notion of Net Work, and I was continually drawn back to the book by Etienne Wenger, Bill Snyder, and Richard McDermott – Cultivating communities of practice. But cultivation also applies to your personal networks – you’ve probably heard or used the term “to cultivate an acquaintance.” So think about cultivating your personal network as the cultivation of the sum of your acquaintances.
  • Personal networks – place is “home”, space is physical space, the pace is holidays, birthdays, and interaction is always in person.Great quote from MichaelShrage, in his book Shared Minds“Two individuals create a set of shared experiences and understandings that are unique to them. They build contexts.”
  • http://www.statemaster.com/encyclopedia/Animal
  • http://www.jasonkolb.com/photos/uncategorized/2007/11/30/balancing_act.jpg
  • Calendar of events – 4 or 5 events bulleted
  • BB
  • Personal Network Management Km Forum Oct 2009

    1. 1. You Are Your Network<br />Personal Networks<br />and<br />Knowledge Management<br />Patti Anklam Boston KM Forum October 21, 2009<br />
    2. 2. Networks<br />
    3. 3. Purpose<br />Structure<br />C<br />Style<br />
    4. 4. Mission<br />Business<br />Idea<br />Networks<br />Learning<br />Family & Personal<br />Purpose<br />
    5. 5. Cluster<br />Peripheral Specialist<br />Structural Hole<br />Net Work<br />Structure<br />
    6. 6. <ul><li>Place
    7. 7. Space
    8. 8. Pace
    9. 9. Style of interaction</li></ul>An Element of Style: Locus<br />Question<br />
    10. 10. Create, examine, and shape a network’s properties<br />Steward the connections in the network<br />Manage the network’s context<br />Net Work<br />Net Work<br />
    11. 11. In corporations:<br />High performers have better networks<br />People with better networks stay in their jobs longer<br />Network-savvy managers are more likely to be promoted<br />People with higher social capital coordinate projectsmore effectively<br />Net Work<br />Net Work and Work Performance<br />
    12. 12. Knowledge Management<br />
    13. 13. Where These Networks Live, Now<br />
    14. 14. Where these networks live, now<br />Personal Networks<br />Play<br />Work<br />
    15. 15.
    16. 16. <ul><li> Global Professional Associations
    17. 17. Face-to-Face Local Groups
    18. 18. Mailing lists
    19. 19. Online Communities
    20. 20. Conferences</li></ul>Learning Networks<br />
    21. 21. Net Work<br />Personal Net Work<br />IT’S WHO KNOWS YOU.<br />…and what you know about them<br />…and what they know about you<br />… and what you are learning, together<br />… and how you work at that<br />
    22. 22. http://www.floodlightconsulting.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/social-networking-what-is-it.jpg<br />What is Goodness?<br />
    23. 23. Diversity<br />Reciprocity<br />C<br />Cultivation<br />
    24. 24. Diversity<br /><ul><li>Culture
    25. 25. Hierarchy
    26. 26. Function
    27. 27. Geography
    28. 28. Expertise</li></li></ul><li>Assessing Diversity<br />
    29. 29. Facebook<br /> applications <br />touchgraph<br />Thinking about Diversity<br />
    30. 30. Reciprocity<br />All that we send into the lives of others<br />…comes back into<br />All that we send into the lives of others<br />…comes back into our own<br />
    31. 31. Share with others as you would have them share with you.<br />
    32. 32. Cultivation<br /><ul><li>Honor your tools
    33. 33. Seed, Feed, and Weed
    34. 34. Light and sunshine
    35. 35. Cross-fertilize</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>What do you want to achieve?
    36. 36. How will you connect?
    37. 37. How will you contribute?
    38. 38. How will you interact?</li></ul>Purpose<br />Question<br />
    39. 39. Social Media Practices<br />Ways that social media can help you create and sustain your personal networks<br />
    40. 40. Connecting, Linking<br />Be authentic (and consistent)<br />Pay attention to status updates<br />Follow wisely<br />
    41. 41. <ul><li> Research people
    42. 42. Find connections
    43. 43. Make yourself findable
    44. 44. It’s all in the profile</li></ul>Finding and making connections<br />
    45. 45. <ul><li>Family, Friends, Colleagues intermixed
    46. 46. Easy to look up “friends in common”
    47. 47. Photos and videos engage
    48. 48. Easy to acknowledge others</li></ul>Keeping track/affiliation<br />
    49. 49. <ul><li> Status updates
    50. 50. Reminders of who’s in your network
    51. 51. Groups provide engagement </li></ul>Keeping track/professional<br />
    52. 52. <ul><li> A vast network of ideas
    53. 53. Follow who others follow
    54. 54. Show people you’re listening
    55. 55. Be in the flow</li></ul>Twitter keeps me in touch with people who are friends of my ideas. I know about their projects and current obsessions; they know about mine. – Jay Rosen<br />
    56. 56. Tweetdeck filters and focuses hundreds of tweets<br />
    57. 57. Learning, Sharing<br />Contribute<br />Seek to be worth knowing<br />Tag everything<br />
    58. 58. <ul><li> RSS feeds (Bloglines, Google Reader)
    59. 59. Quick glance at what’s new
    60. 60. Organized by themes</li></ul>Reading Blogs<br />
    61. 61. <ul><li> The BRAND called you
    62. 62. What interests you shows up
    63. 63. You share ideas, perspectives
    64. 64. Your blog is a shared experience</li></ul>Writing Blogs<br />
    65. 65. <ul><li> My memory
    66. 66. Who else is interested?
    67. 67. My tags are part of the shared mind </li></ul>Tagging<br />
    68. 68. Personal Net Work Practices<br />http://quilting.about.com/od/picturesofquilts/ig/Alzheimer-s-Quilts/The-Ties-that-Bind.htm<br />
    69. 69. Management<br />Weaving<br />C<br />Maintenance<br />
    70. 70. Managing<br /><ul><li> You can’t manage a network,you can only manage its context
    71. 71. You can put yourself in the way of serendipity
    72. 72. You can assess whether the network you have is the network you want to be</li></li></ul><li>Weaving<br /><ul><li> Close triangles
    73. 73. Know the net, knit the net
    74. 74. Make introductions</li></li></ul><li>Maintenance<br /><ul><li> Follow, acknowledge
    75. 75. Meet your imaginary friends
    76. 76. Take care of your network</li></li></ul><li>Keeping in Touch<br />
    77. 77. Net Work Summary<br />Network intentionally, authentically<br />Steward the network<br />Embrace technology <br />Develop your capacity for net work<br />Be the network you want to be<br />
    78. 78. <ul><li>patti@pattianklam.com
    79. 79. http://www.pattianklam.com/
    80. 80. http://www.twitter.com/panklam
    81. 81. http://www.theappgap.com/</li></ul>Thank you.<br />Question<br />

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