Connect2014 Spot101: Cloud Readiness 101: Analyzing and Visualizing Your IT Infrastructure

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Florian Vogler, panagenda
Franz Walder, panagenda

IBM Connect 2014, Orlando

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Connect2014 Spot101: Cloud Readiness 101: Analyzing and Visualizing Your IT Infrastructure

  1. 1. SPOT101: Cloud Readiness 101: Analyzing and Visualizing Your IT Infrastructure Florian Vogler, panagenda Franz Walder, panagenda © 2014 IBM Corporation
  2. 2. Agenda  Getting started – Introduction – What can you expect from this session? – What is The Cloud and why are companies “moving there”?  Making your infrastructure transformation a success – Key factors identified and explained – User activity analysis (who uses what and how?) – Application design analysis (identifying scope and feasibility constraints)  Summary: Infrastructure as a whole 2
  3. 3. Introduction  Florian Vogler, CEO and CTO – Over 20 years of experience in Notes / Domino – Focus on IBM Notes Client optimization in the past 10 years – Lives in Germany and travels A LOT  Franz Walder, Product Manager – 15 years experience in (what used to be) the Lotus universe – Administrator, developer, virtualization enthusiast – Lives in Austria (hence the funny accent) 3
  4. 4. What can you expect from this session?  Understanding how moving to the cloud is best approached in an IBM Domino environment – Findings are equally valuable for choosing the right application modernization strategy  Ways to identify and measure critical success factors involved, in order to be able to calculate expected effort  An idea of how panagenda helps their customers to tackle challenges like that 4
  5. 5. Getting started What is The Cloud, and what other “destinations” are important? 5
  6. 6. Getting started What is The Cloud and why are companies “moving there”?  The “Why?” – Costs (Capex / Opex) – Flexibility • Integration • Scalability – Easier Upgrades – Speed  The “How?” – That is what this session is all about – There is no “Move to cloud”–button … – “Adapting a Cloud strategy” is a key driving factor for many companies nowadays in their process of transforming the existing IT infrastructure 6
  7. 7. Getting started Evolution of IT projects: From static projects … 7
  8. 8. Getting started Evolution of IT projects: … to ongoing agile transformation! 8
  9. 9. Getting started Evolution of IT projects: From static projects to ongoing agile transformation!  Segmentation! 9
  10. 10. Making your move a success Key factors identified and explained 10
  11. 11. Key factors identified and explained  Clarifying why you do it and for whom – Understand the motivators of your stakeholders (Management / Governance, Technical, Business) – Why you do it has a big influence on setting your goal and how you measure success  User Activity Analysis – Demand Characteristics • Usage (Reads, Writes, Users) • Load (Transactions, CPU, Memory, …) • Availability / Reliability / Performance – Geographies / Topologies • Bandwidth (demand vs. availability) 11
  12. 12. Key factors identified and explained  Application Design Analysis – Cross Linkage of Mail, Apps & Business Processes – Dependencies • Features & Functions (e.g. Telephony integration, Archiving, …) • Interfaces (Fax, Files, Printers, Dongles, …)  Tying those findings to organizational structures – Has its foundation in user activity – Evaluate infrastructure utilization by cost center rather than technical by user or DB – Identify areas with special significance • e.g. databases which are mainly used by VIPs • activity benchmarks across departments 12
  13. 13. Making your move a success Increasing Consulting Demand 13 Decreasing Risk for Customer & IBM
  14. 14. User Activity Analysis Who uses what and how? 14
  15. 15. User Activity Analysis Overview  What can user activity tell you?  How to get the data without 3rd party tools (log.nsf, catalog.nsf, …)  DEMO: Activity analysis customer example  Activity analysis conclusion 15
  16. 16. User Activity Analysis What can user activity tell you?  Read vs. Write traffic  Mail vs. Apps  Transactions (Server load)  High impact users and applications  Excessive usage 16
  17. 17. User Activity Analysis How to get the data without 3rd party tools  DB Activity: LOG.NSF – documents with form type “Activity” • View selection formula: SELECT FORM = "Activity" • Add columns that are interesting in your scenario 17
  18. 18. User Activity Analysis How to get the data without 3rd party tools  DB Activity: LOG.NSF – database activity details • • • 18 Note there is a 1400 activity entry maximum per database (FIFO) There is also a 64K size limit for the user activity More details in IBM Technote #1086245
  19. 19. User Activity Analysis How to get the data without 3rd party tools  DB Activity: CATALOG.NSF – related information, but different focus – Full text index details – Replication information – ACL overview Note: Domino does not distinguish between user, server or maintenance tasks activity at this level 19
  20. 20. User Activity Analysis How to get the data without 3rd party tools  User Activity: LOG.NSF – basic information is easy to extract • • 20 File → Export → Comma Separated Value Combine results of multiple servers in spreadsheet calculation software
  21. 21. IBM Domino Doublecheck – and beyond One-off engagement Processed off site Fixed set of topics IBM Domino Doublecheck 21 Ongoing solution Deployed on premises Customized topics DNA iDNA
  22. 22. User Activity Analysis DEMO: Activity analysis customer example 22
  23. 23. What happens when moving to the cloud ... 23
  24. 24. What happens when moving to the cloud ... ? On premise ? ? 24 ?
  25. 25. What happens when moving to the cloud ... ? ? ? ? 25 ? Off premise
  26. 26. Traffic jam 26
  27. 27. What happens when moving to the cloud ... Off premise ? ? ? ? ? 27
  28. 28. User Activity Analysis Conclusion  How does user activity suggest what to do? – Number of users showing activity – Reads/writes in sessions and network traffic – Possible destinations • Web application (e.g. XPages) • Mobile application • Notes browser plugin • Hybrid • ...  Enriching raw activity information – Geographic data: Which applications are used from where? – HR data: Which applications are used by VIPs, field agents, etc.? 28
  29. 29. Application Design Analysis Identifying scope and feasibility constraints 29
  30. 30. Application Design Analysis Overview  Why design analysis and what are the factors?  Geography and Topology considerations  DEMO: Design analysis customer example (Tableau)  Design analysis conclusion 30
  31. 31. Application Design Analysis Overview On premise 31
  32. 32. Application Design Analysis DEMO: Design analysis customer example 32
  33. 33. Application Design Analysis Conclusion  How does application design suggest direct where to go? – Dependencies on hardware (e.g. dongle, mobile phone, etc.) or software (e.g. DLL) – Standard applications (Mail, Teamrooms) often migratable wiht very low effort – Design complexity may make transformation (e.g. Web, Mobile) „unaffordable“  Possible destinations – Web application (e.g. XPages) – Mobile application – Notes browser plugin – ... 33
  34. 34. Infrastructure as a whole Understanding the big picture 34
  35. 35. Summary: Infrastructure as a whole Understanding the big picture is the key to success  Combining usage and design analysis is essential  Organizational considerations – Who owns and “will pay” for migrating an application? – Combination with HR data (evaluate based on department)  Compare efficiency of infrastructure consolidation vs transformation  IBM Domino Doublecheck is a great foundation 35
  36. 36. Questions?
  37. 37.  Access Connect Online to complete your session surveys using any: – Web or mobile browser – Connect Online kiosk onsite 37
  38. 38. Acknowledgements and Disclaimers Availability. References in this presentation to IBM products, programs, or services do not imply that they will be available in all countries in which IBM operates. The workshops, sessions and materials have been prepared by IBM or the session speakers and reflect their own views. They are provided for informational purposes only, and are neither intended to, nor shall have the effect of being, legal or other guidance or advice to any participant. While efforts were made to verify the completeness and accuracy of the information contained in this presentation, it is provided AS-IS without warranty of any kind, express or implied. IBM shall not be responsible for any damages arising out of the use of, or otherwise related to, this presentation or any other materials. Nothing contained in this presentation is intended to, nor shall have the effect of, creating any warranties or representations from IBM or its suppliers or licensors, or altering the terms and conditions of the applicable license agreement governing the use of IBM software. All customer examples described are presented as illustrations of how those customers have used IBM products and the results they may have achieved. Actual environmental costs and performance characteristics may vary by customer. Nothing contained in these materials is intended to, nor shall have the effect of, stating or implying that any activities undertaken by you will result in any specific sales, revenue growth or other results. © Copyright IBM Corporation 2014. All rights reserved.  U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights - Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.  IBM, the IBM logo, ibm.com, Lotus and IBM Domino, IBM Notes, IBM Traveler are trademarks or registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. If these and other IBM trademarked terms are marked on their first occurrence in this information with a trademark symbol (® or ™), these symbols indicate U.S. registered or common law trademarks owned by IBM at the time this information was published. Such trademarks may also be registered or common law trademarks in other countries. A current list of IBM trademarks is available on the Web at “Copyright and trademark information” at www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml  Trust Factory, the Trust Factory logo, trust-factory.com, and DNA are trademarks or registered trademarks of Trust Factory in the United States, other countries, or both.  panagenda, the panagenda logo, panagenda.com, and iDNA are trademarks or registered trademarks of panagenda in the United States, other countries, or both. Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others. 38

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