Lean Presentation

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This presentation describes the process for building a strong Lean culture.

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  • There are two crucial elements to successful and sustainable Lean implementation. First, complete buy-in and support from the plant manager is critical. The plant manager must make his commitment to this process clear to all of his reports and to the plant as a whole. Second, work must be standardized with stable processes in place. For this reason, it is critical that TWI Job Instruction be delivered to a minimum of 20% of the plant’s population. This module, with implementation training, is designed to teach floor personnel and supervisors how to standardize each work process and how to teach others the processes in a consistent manner so that standardized processes are passed down and carried out employee to employee with little to no variation. In the first step of implementation, it is crucial that all supervisors and managers have complete buy-in to the process. While most leads and some supervisors may have been introduced to Lean concepts, there is a large pocket of supervisors and managers who have either never been exposed to Lean or who were trained several years ago and may need refreshers. Furthermore, an introduction to Value Stream Mapping will further enhance this group’s vision of the larger picture. To maximize instruction for participants, employees should undergo an initial assessment to determine if there are some employee groups who may need enhanced math and technical reading refreshers.
  • Lean 101 Workshop Supervisors and managers will learn the basic principles of Lean Manufacturing and how to apply them. During the simulation exercises, they will apply Lean concepts such as standardized work, visual signals, batch-size reduction, pull systems and more to a simulated production line. Supervisors and managers experience firsthand how Lean improves quality, reduces cycle time, improves delivery performance, and reduces Work-In-Process (WIP), enabling the company to enhance profitability potential. Introduction to Value Stream Mapping for Supervisors and Managers Purpose of Value Stream Mapping Helps business enterprises think of flow instead of discrete production processes and drives the lean systems implementation rather than isolated process improvements. Visual representation of a process - Represents all the actions required to deliver a product or service to a customer (Value-added / Non-value added). Value stream mapping is a tool commonly used in lean continuous improvement programs to help understand and improve the material and information flow within organizations. Value Stream Mapping borne out of lean ideology captures and presents the whole process from end to end in a method that is easy to understand by those working the process - it captures the current issues and presents a realistic picture. Through a simple to understand graphical format, future state (a diagram showing an improved and altered process) can be formulated and defined. The method encourages a team approach and through the capture of performance measurement data provides a mechanism to constructively critique activity. Participants in the activity are encouraged to suggest improvements and contribute towards and implement an action plan. As with any lean management toolset the principle aim of Value Stream Mapping is to improve processes. This is achieved by highlighting areas of waste within a process and therefore enabling businesses to eliminate these activities. Value Stream Mapping also has the benefit of categorizing process activity into three main areas - value add, non value add (but necessary), and waste. Course Goal Upon completion of the Value Stream Mapping course, participants have learned: The Lean definition of value The Lean definition of waste The symbols of a Value Stream Map Mapping the material and information flow Value stream calculations Identifying waste Leveling resources Creating the Future State Value Stream Mapping Course Description Participants learn the technique of Lean process mapping, also known as Value Stream Mapping. This technique is used to analyze information and work flow from the customer’s initial request to delivery of the final product or service. Course participants learn the symbols and language of a value stream map and will be able to interpret existing maps as well as author new maps.
  • Training Within Industry TWI, Training Within Industry, is a dynamic program of hands-on learning and practice, teaching essential skills for supervisors, team leaders, and anyone who directs the work of others from all industries and vocations. TWI teaches the skills of job instruction, job methods improvement, and job relations. In five 2-hour sessions, supervisors and leads not only learn a well-defined and easy-to-implement method for each skill, but bring in actual jobs from their own worksites in a “learn-by-doing” approach that is efficient and effective. Each module is presented by certified instructors using the proven TWI methodology ensuring the quality standards for each training class. To support a continuous improvement, environment workers need to develop the skills represented in these three modules. By doing so, TWI provides an immediate return on investment for companies by utilizing the productive potential of their employees. History TWI was developed in the U.S. during WWII to train replacements for an industrial workforce that was off to fight a war. It provided rapid and consistent training and is recognized as part of what helped the Allied forces secure victory as they boosted industrial production and out-produced the enemy. TWI was an unqualified success. Expansion in Japan TWI was introduced in Japan during post-war rebuilding. It is still in widespread use in Japan and most notably, in Toyota as part of the Toyota Production System (TPS). It is a foundation to Toyota's success in continuous improvement, and more importantly, in its ability to sustain those improvements. Job Relations The objective of JR is to help supervisors improve their ability to work with people. For a supervisor, results are all about the output of other people. Without their cooperation, work will not be carried out effectively. When this skill is acquired, supervisors get the cooperation they need. Developing and maintaining good relations helps supervisors and employees solve and prevent problems. The JR principles include providing constructive feedback, giving credit when due, telling people in advance about changes that will affect them, making the best use of each person's ability, and earning the employee's loyalty and cooperation. The JR method teaches supervisors how to get the facts, weigh them carefully, make the decision, take action, and check results, utilizing a step-by-step methodology. When utilized in every situation, Job Relations ensures consistency in problem-solving and builds morale.
  • Job Instruction The first step in creating a lean process is to achieve process stability. Job Instruction (JI) is the cornerstone for standard work in every process on the floor. When Art Smalley asked Isao Kato, father of standardized work and kaizen training courses at Toyota, about which of the TWI courses had the biggest impact (on Toyota) and why? Mr. Kato replied: “ The JI thinking is really critical and somewhat under-appreciated in TPS formulation. The capability to breakdown a job is fundamental in terms of helping create a standard for teaching others. It is much easier and smaller step than to create the three elements of Standardized Work (takt time, work sequence, and standard amounts of work-in-process) after JI is in place. Plus when you change takt time and move work around, JI is the perfect vehicle to train people. For this reason I believe, and I think that Mr. Ohno would agree, that JI had by far the biggest impact on TPS formulation.” In their book The Toyota Way Fieldbook Jeffrey Liker and David Meier tell us that the first step in creating a lean process in Toyota is to achieve process stability. They note a number of causes for instability in processes, two of which are the lack of standard work and the tremendous variation in the methods and time it takes from person to person and across shifts it takes to perform a given process. These are the same two problems ESCO Turbine Technologies-Syracuse identified in their strategic planning process that led them on a search for a training methodology that was repeatable and verifiable. Their search led them to the TWI Job Instruction program that they credit for meeting their strategic goals to reduce defects by 50% as a way to reduce inventory and increase the speed of flow to reduce lead time for the customer.
  • Job Methods Job Methods Training teaches leads and supervisors how to produce greater quantities of quality products in less time by making the best use of the people, machines, and materials now available. Job Methods teaches workers to objectively evaluate the efficiency of their jobs and to methodically evaluate and suggest improvements. Workers are taught to break down their work into small parts, analyze each step, and determine if there is sufficient reason to continue to do it in that way by asking a series of pointed questions. Using this breakdown, people will be able to look at improving work methods by eliminating, combining, rearranging or simplifying these details. They are then taught to develop and apply the new method by selling it to supervisors and co-workers, obtaining approval based on safety, quality, quantity, and cost, standardizing the new method, and giving "credit where credit is due." When this skill is used continuously, it will allow companies to utilize the workforce, machines, and materials now available more effectively to achieve greater production of good quality products.
  • Root Cause Analysis Root cause analysis (RCA) is a class of problem solving methods aimed at identifying the root causes of problems or events. The practice of RCA is predicated on the belief that problems are best solved by attempting to correct or eliminate root causes, as opposed to merely addressing the immediately obvious symptoms. In addition to covering the following topics in a classroom setting, the instructor will work with participants on the floor to identify projects, work through the process, and select and use the appropriate tools for analysis. General principles of root cause analysis: Aiming corrective measures at root causes is more effective than merely treating the symptoms of a problem. To be effective, RCA must be performed systematically, and conclusions must be backed up by evidence. There is usually more than one root cause for any given problem. General process for performing root cause analysis: Define the problem. Gather data/evidence. Identify issues that contributed to the problem. Find root causes. Develop solution recommendations. Implement the recommendations. Observe the recommended solutions to ensure effectiveness Root Cause Tools: Process Map Pareto analysis Cause and Effect (C&E) Matrix Causal factor tree analysis 5 Whys Analysis Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Fault tree analysis Ishikawa diagram (Ishikawa, Cause and Effect) Confirmation of Causal Effects: Linear Regression ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) Chi-Square Test
  • 5 S Implementation Manufacturing companies have a growing, market-driven need to adopt world-class operating methodologies such as 5S principles. The principles of 5S are the basics for initiating a Lean program. Understanding the program's importance and knowing how to get started are the most important steps. Workplace organization and visual order are the foundation of excellence in manufacturing. The company that has implemented 5S displays a level of visual clarity that many organizations have never dreamed of. When these principles are in place on the production floor, work is completed more efficiently, effectively, and safely. The objectives of a 5S implementation program are to: 1. Educate the management team in World Class Manufacturing (WCM) and show how 5S supports world-class performance 2. Plan and carry out pilot applications of 5S principles, supporting the execution of work steps by: -Preparing and facilitating a management education and planning workshop -Assisting in structuring and documenting the 5S pilot projects -Preparing and delivering project management training -Establishing benchmarks to measure outcomes -Leading interim project reviews -Educating an in-house resource to assist in future 5S coordination -Presenting a summary of observations and recommendations An investment in 5S Implementation (versus training alone) will yield many advantages: • You will overcome the inertia or “organizational procrastination”. • We will help you identify the best possible starting point through carefully selected pilot projects, ensuring small successes early on. • Execution of the pilot projects will provide early economic benefits, such as improved safety, quality, productivity, and reduced waste. These benefits usually offset, at least, the entire cost of the pilot projects. • Your management team will become knowledgeable in WCM and 5S concepts by seeing firsthand the effects of their application • You will be spared the frustration and expense of false starts • Those who planned and implemented the pilot projects can now help other teams in the expansion phase; i.e. Six Sigma Green/Black Belts. • Your in-house 5S resource will be capable of providing training and project management support in the expansion phase • You will have a clear vision of the role 5S principles play in addressing vital business needs and opportunities
  • Kaizen Experience, hands-on, the three-day Kaizen event that is one of the most critical tools for generating rapid, substantial Lean improvement. As a member of a Kaizen team applying Lean tools at your company, you will discover firsthand the dramatic manufacturing and business process efficiencies and bottom-line improvement that can quickly be achieved and sustained in your company. You will see how Kaizen eliminates waste and generates immediate improvement and cost savings – and how the revolutionary Lean process drives new efficiencies and competitive advantage, without additional capital. 3-Days of On-site, Action-Learning, featuring: Participative Exercises – that clearly demonstrate the "Gemba" (shop floor) control advantages of kaizen driven lean manufacturing. Kaizen Blitz "On-the-Job" Training – a "gemba" tour, project selection, problem solving, goal setting and results assessment... all aimed at the transfer of the skills required to plan and execute a kaizen blitz. The Kaizen Blitz – putting the knowledge learned in work in the real world.
  • KanBan Implementation KanBans are "self-evident signals" that indicate what work is to be done and when. They reduce inventory and give clear indicators of current production status. Many of the benefits of becoming Lean can be traced back to the implementation of KanBans. KanBans clearly identify needed work, reduce the number of defective parts produced, allow for job-sharing, give instant visual indicators of productivity and constraints, along with many other benefits. Ultimately, most KanBans evolve into what is known as "One Piece Flow" where parts are literally passed from one operation to the next, with no wait time between work stations. With minimal investment, KanBan manufacturing systems enjoy many real benefits. NWACC will work with your employees from the beginning to establish proper KanBans throughout all operations. Outline of KanBan Instruction and Application Training Introduction to KanBan Systems Scheduling KanBan -An industry expert teaches supervisors how to determine the number of kanbans needed -Instructor teaches supervisors how to calculate takt time -Instructor helps supervisors determine the optimum number of operators needed for each process: --Create maps of the process --Create cycle-time charts for each operator --Balance the lines until all operators and machines achieve full work -Establish level production Circulating KanBan -Supervisors and Leads are introduced to KanBan cycles -Instructor assists with onsite implementation Improving with KanBan -Instructor teaches supervisors how to fine-tune production by gradually reducing the number of kanbans being used and improving the problem areas that emerge. (A brief overview of Kaizen events is provided.) -Instructor introduces visual controls and assists supervisors with selection of appropriate controls
  • Lean Presentation

    1. 1. Building a Lean Culture Preparing tomorrow’s workforce today. Pam Watkins Phone: 870.821.1212 - Email: pam.watkins@ymail.edu
    2. 2. Lean Implementation To maintain status as a world-class manufacturing facility and to increase overall profitability through implementation of Lean management principles Proposed Solution To best meet the objective, launch full Lean implementation by providing a solid understanding of Lean principles throughout the plant, touching all levels of employees, so that all levels can contribute to continuous improvement . Furthermore, implementation training should be provided so that principles learned are applied on the floor as trainers work with employees to identify and implement real projects .
    3. 3. This presentation seeks to familiarize participants with the primary components of Lean needed for successful implementation. Detailed information can be found in the notes. To be successful, implementation of Lean should occur in a specific sequence of events that will vary slightly depending on critical challenges a particular company may be facing. It isn’t the intention of this presentation to follow the implementation sequence. Lean Implementation
    4. 4. The Driving Force of Lean Managers and supervisors provide the framework for Lean by committing to the process and communicating that commitment to all employees. All managers and supervisors must be first in line for Lean Management 101 training. To reinforce their commitment by realizing immediate results, Lean 101 should be immediately followed by Value Stream Mapping . Lean Implementation
    5. 5. The Driving Force of Lean People on the floor (Gimba) are the engine of continuous improvement. In 10 hours, Training Within Industry (TWI) Job Relations builds respect into people relations by teaching supervisors a method that ensures consistent treatment and uses a problem-solving approach to employee issues that increases morale and boosts productivity. Lean Implementation
    6. 6. The Driving Force of Lean The first step to continuous improvement is creating stable processes that are consistently performed by employees on the floor. Think consistency and precision of piston timing. In 10 hours, TWI Job Instruction teaches leads, supervisors, and other experienced workers how to define and document each of their processes and then teaches them a fool-proof method for teaching (OJT) others how to duplicate the process in a manner that is easy for workers to retain. Lean Implementation
    7. 7. The Driving Force of Lean The transmission that shifts the gears of performance are the Lean tools that provide foundational understanding of continuous improvement. <ul><li>Foundation for Continuous Improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Lean 101 </li></ul><ul><li>TWI Job Methods </li></ul><ul><li>Root Cause Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Six Sigma </li></ul>Lean Implementation
    8. 8. The Driving Force of Lean In 10 hours, TWI Job Methods teaches w orkers to break down work into small parts, analyze each step, and determine if there is sufficient reason to continue to do it in that way by asking a series of pointed questions. Using the breakdown, people look at improving work methods by eliminating, combining, rearranging or simplifying details. Real improvement begins once stable processes have been defined. Employees can then introduce changes to the process and will begin to measure improvement. Lean Implementation
    9. 9. The Driving Force of Lean Root Cause Analysis (RCA) teaches problem solving methods aimed at identifying the root causes of problems or events. The practice of RCA is predicated on the belief that problems are best solved by attempting to correct or eliminate root causes, as opposed to merely addressing the immediately obvious symptoms. Root Cause Analysis allows supervisors and engineers to identify and eliminate problems at their core early on in the process. Lean Implementation
    10. 10. The Driving Force of Lean Lean Tools Promote Friction-Free Production <ul><li>Lean Tools that Reduce Friction </li></ul><ul><li>5S </li></ul><ul><li>Kaizen Events </li></ul><ul><li>KanBan Systems </li></ul>Lean Implementation
    11. 11. The Driving Force of Lean 5S Workplace organization and visual order are the foundation for excellence in manufacturing. The company that has implemented 5S displays a level of visual clarity that many organizations have never dreamed of. When these principles are in place on the production floor, work is completed more efficiently, effectively, and safely. Lean Implementation
    12. 12. The Driving Force of Lean Kaizen Events A Kaizen team applies Lean tools to produce dramatic manufacturing and business process efficiencies and bottom-line improvement that can quickly be achieved and sustained. Kaizen eliminates waste and generates immediate improvement and cost savings – generally without additional capital. Lean Implementation
    13. 13. The Driving Force of Lean KanBan Systems KanBans are &quot;self-evident or visual signals“ that indicate what work is to be done and when. They reduce inventory, allow for job-sharing, and give clear indicators of current production status. Ultimately, most KanBans evolve into what is known as &quot;One Piece Flow&quot; where parts are literally passed from one operation to the next, with no wait time between work stations. Lean Implementation
    14. 14. The Driving Force of Lean Other Lean Tools While many other Lean tools exist, this presentation covers the essential tools that companies need to master to gain a solid continuous improvement foundation. Once the proposed foundation has been laid, companies begin to see a cultural change taking place and a phenomenal ROI rolls in. A common language and problem solving methodology enhances morale and productivity. The ROI will further escalate as the road will be paved for Six Sigma project implementation. Lean Implementation

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