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Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication
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Design Matters: Design Basics for Leadership Communication

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Leaders no longer have the luxury of letting others communicate for them. Many things go into successful communication, among them understand how and when visuals can facilitate your message. This …

Leaders no longer have the luxury of letting others communicate for them. Many things go into successful communication, among them understand how and when visuals can facilitate your message. This presentation introduces some of the practical aspects of design and the concept of the experience of communication. The goal is to develop an awareness of the multi-sensory aspects of communication, such as the use of visuals, environment, timing, body language, and style. These elements are important if you want to make a meaningful connection with an audience. A meaningful connection is necessary if you want to influence people.

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  • I have a question for you: Are you caught up in the WOW of AR—the entertainment and gadget value; the bells and whistles that take our breath away or are you pondering how AR and emerging technologies can be used to make a change in the world through things like education, advocacy, and social change?
  • KurtLewin – Behavior is a function of the person and their environment(1) Group productivity: why was it that groups are so ineffective in getting things done? (2) Communication: how influence is spread throughout a group. (3) Social perception: how a person's group affected the way they perceived social events. (4) Intergroup relations. (5) Group membership: how individuals adjust to these conditions. (6) training leaders: improving the functioning of groups (T-groups).
  • Orange square is the same in all for squaresBackground may influence how the eye perceives color
  • Visual system compensates for light source when perceiving colorHypothesis is that information is adjusted to the average color of entire visual fieldMaintains perception of color constancy across light changesWe interpret yellow in shadow as yellow, not different colorPerceiving familiar objects as having consistent color, even if changing illumination filters the light reflected by the object.
  • Cognitive override visual -Opponent-Process Theory- opposing retinal processes enable color vision – Helmholtz theory – retina cones are sensitive to blue, green, and red
  • Sensation – even movement – can be created with use of colors – alternating hues, values, and brightness as well as placement
  • The Gestalt theorists were the first group of psychologists to systematcially study perceptual organisation around the 1920’s, in Germany. Gestalt means when parts identified individually have different characteristics to the whole (Gestalt means "organised whole")e.g. describing a tree - it's parts are trunk, branches, leaves, perhaps blossoms or fruitBut when you look at an entire tree, you are not conscious of the parts, you are aware of the overall object - the tree.Parts are of secondary importance even though they can be clearly seen.
  • The Gestalt theorists were the first group of psychologists to systematcially study perceptual organisation around the 1920’s, in Germany. Gestalt means when parts identified individually have different characteristics to the whole (Gestalt means "organised whole")e.g. describing a tree - it's parts are trunk, branches, leaves, perhaps blossoms or fruitBut when you look at an entire tree, you are not conscious of the parts, you are aware of the overall object - the tree.Parts are of secondary importance even though they can be clearly seen.
  • The Gestalt theorists were the first group of psychologists to systematcially study perceptual organisation around the 1920’s, in Germany. Gestalt means when parts identified individually have different characteristics to the whole (Gestalt means "organised whole")e.g. describing a tree - it's parts are trunk, branches, leaves, perhaps blossoms or fruitBut when you look at an entire tree, you are not conscious of the parts, you are aware of the overall object - the tree.Parts are of secondary importance even though they can be clearly seen.
  • The Gestalt theorists were the first group of psychologists to systematcially study perceptual organisation around the 1920’s, in Germany. Gestalt means when parts identified individually have different characteristics to the whole (Gestalt means "organised whole")e.g. describing a tree - it's parts are trunk, branches, leaves, perhaps blossoms or fruitBut when you look at an entire tree, you are not conscious of the parts, you are aware of the overall object - the tree.Parts are of secondary importance even though they can be clearly seen.
  • The Gestalt theorists were the first group of psychologists to systematcially study perceptual organisation around the 1920’s, in Germany. Gestalt means when parts identified individually have different characteristics to the whole (Gestalt means "organised whole")e.g. describing a tree - it's parts are trunk, branches, leaves, perhaps blossoms or fruitBut when you look at an entire tree, you are not conscious of the parts, you are aware of the overall object - the tree.Parts are of secondary importance even though they can be clearly seen.
  • The Gestalt theorists were the first group of psychologists to systematcially study perceptual organisation around the 1920’s, in Germany. Gestalt means when parts identified individually have different characteristics to the whole (Gestalt means "organised whole")e.g. describing a tree - it's parts are trunk, branches, leaves, perhaps blossoms or fruitBut when you look at an entire tree, you are not conscious of the parts, you are aware of the overall object - the tree.Parts are of secondary importance even though they can be clearly seen.
  • The Gestalt theorists were the first group of psychologists to systematcially study perceptual organisation around the 1920’s, in Germany. Gestalt means when parts identified individually have different characteristics to the whole (Gestalt means "organised whole")e.g. describing a tree - it's parts are trunk, branches, leaves, perhaps blossoms or fruitBut when you look at an entire tree, you are not conscious of the parts, you are aware of the overall object - the tree.Parts are of secondary importance even though they can be clearly seen.
  • Using human perceptual features to create illusion of depth.
  • Transcript

    • 1. DESIGN
    • 2. As soon as you move one stop up from the bottom, your effectiveness depends on your ability to reach others … Peter Drucker
    • 3. 93% of Communication is Nonverbal
    • 4. Words are processed by our short-term memory where we can only retain about 7 bits of information, plus or minus 2… Images, on the other hand, go directly into long-term memory where they are indelibly etched. Source: Berger, Ways of Seeing, 1972.
    • 5. What is
    • 6. When you design a presentation, yo u can define the universe for your users
    • 7. This is for you CREATE A
    • 8. Source: http://austinkleon.com/tag/powerpoint/
    • 9. > Design Creates: credibility status likeability self-efficacy enjoyment motivation productivity behavior change
    • 10. B=f (P,E) We can change behavior by designing the environment
    • 11. The background influences the eye’s perception of color COLOR
    • 12. COLOR
    • 13. COGNITIVE
    • 14. Yes, sure! No problem. COGNITIVE
    • 15. Alternating hues, values and brightness or the juxtaposition of complementary colors creates perceptions of movement COLOR MAKE
    • 16. GESTA T PERCEPTUALPRINCIPLE S
    • 17. • • • • • • • Figure and Ground Similarity Proximity Closure Continuity Symmetry Area GESTALT
    • 18. • • • • • • • Figure and Ground Similarity Proximity Closure Continuity Symmetry Area GESTALT
    • 19. • • • • • • • Figure and Ground Similarity Proximity Closure Continuity Symmetry Area GESTALT
    • 20. • • • • • • • Figure and Ground Similarity Proximity Closure Continuity Symmetry Area GESTALT
    • 21. • • • • • Figure and Ground Similarity Proximity Closure Continuity Symmetry • Area GESTALT
    • 22. • • • • • • • Figure and Ground Similarity Proximity Closure Continuity Symmetry Area GESTALT
    • 23. • • • • • • • Figure and Ground Similarity Proximity Closure Continuity Symmetry Area GESTALT
    • 24. PERCEPTUAL
    • 25. HIERARCHY
    • 26. WHAT
    • 27. PERCEPTIONS
    • 28. FORM & 33
    • 29. FILL IN THE
    • 30. WHAT
    • 31. legibility legibility legibility
    • 32. Written Oral Written with organizing elements like bullets & color Written material translated into charts Purely visual COMMUNICATIO
    • 33. BENEFITS • Getting attention • Providing context • Reducing learning time • Showing contrast • Illustrating abstract concepts • Demonstrating a process • Sharing a vision SPEAKING
    • 34. DESIGN

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