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    Multiliteracy powerpoint assignment 1 edx3270 Multiliteracy powerpoint assignment 1 edx3270 Presentation Transcript

    • THE NEED FOR MULTILITERACY IN THE 21ST CENTURY COURSE: EDX3270 ASSIGNMENT ONE PRESENTED BY: PAMELA JORY STUDENT NUMBER: 006 1015667
    • Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2006). Teaching and learning multiliteracies: changing times, changing literacies 56- 81. Newark, Delaware: International Reading Association. Anstey & Bull, explore the implications for pedagogical change which will assist students in developing multiliterate skills. Principles of a multiliterate curriculum and pedagogies that promote, support and develop teaching and learning strategies are reviewed. Student diversity, the need for flexible, strategic practices and the ability to cope with change is discussed. Anstey & Bull make a strong case for the offering of a dynamic pedagogy, teaching the thinking, behavioral and social skills required to become active citizens. How classroom practice shapes learning and the value of positive and inclusive classroom management is identified. As a future educator I see the need for a multiliterate curriculum that offers flexibility, and diversity of pedagogical practice are key components of classroom education.
    • This article captures how multimodal text such as picture books, web pages and live performances support student learning, and how teachers can exploit the pedagogy to facilitate multi-modal literacy. Multimodal texts are described as text that combines two or more semiotic systems, which include; linguistic, visual, audio, gestural and spatial. Knowledge of these semiotic systems and metalanguage skills, must be supported through explicit teaching pedagogy processes. The recognition of a positive and balanced school- wide approach to the teaching of literacy and multimodal texts is explored. As educators it is vital to offer empowering pedagogical practices that offer students the ability to understand, interpret, reflect and create multimodal texts. PICTURE BOOKS WEBPAGES LIVE PERFORMANCES Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2010). Helping teachers to explore multimodal texts. Curriculum & Leadership Journal. 8, 1-5. Retrieved from http://www.curriculum.edu.au/leader/helping_teachers_to_explore_multimodal_texts,31522.html?iss ueID=12141
    • Borsheim, C., Merritt, K., & Reed, D. (2008). Beyond technology for technology’s sake: advancing multiliteracies in the twenty-first century. Clearing House: A Journal of Educational strategies, Issues and Ideas, 82(2), 87-90. Retrieved from http://cfritts.pbworks.com/f/Beyond+Technology.pdf  Borshiem, Merritt & Reed, state that the nature of literacy is changing and teachers must offer multiliterate pedagogies prepare students, for the realities of life in the 21st century. There is a monumental shift from traditional literacy teachings to multiliteracy teachings, reflecting on communication technologies and multimedia texts.  To be an active member of the community, one must be social, and culturally aware of literacy and literate practices. Borsheim, Merrit & Reed believe that technology enhances a student’s ability to understand the global community.  Therefore, in order to meet the demands of the 21st century educators today must offer pedagogy that extends their students learning, offering diversity and inclusion within the classroom and school environment.
    • THEN and NOW THEN NOW
    • Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2009). Multiliteracies: new literacies new learning, Pedagogies: an International Journal, 4: 164-195.  Multiliteracies: New Literacies, outlines the social and technological changes in learning and communication styles. They suggest education as a key source of social equity, where diverse communities can be catered for and active citizenship can be achieved. The modalities of meaning and the changes in literacy teaching methods over time are reviewed. Finally the diverse impact, on 3 groups of educators are examined as core concepts of a multiliterate pedagogy are explored.  The findings of this study note that the old literacy methods of teaching, such as copying from a blackboard and reciting work, is no longer adequate. Educative practices must change to suit modern society, utilizing computer technology and collaborative curriculum choices.
    • Dastgoshadeh, A., & Jalizadeh, K. (2011). Multiple intelligences-based language curriculum for the third millennium. International Conference on Education, Research and Innovation. IPEDR 18, 57-62. Retrieved from http://www.ipedr.com/vol18/13-ICERI2011-R10021.pdf Dastgoshadeh and Jalilzadeh (2011), discuss the influence of Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences as a basis for eclectic teaching pedagogy’s. The 21st century is described as the third millennium, an ear of multi; where multiple intelligences theory thrives as multiple methods of learning can be enhanced and supported. The philosophical foundations of Gardner’s theory and how curriculum development can be supported using this framework are identified. Assessment policies and practices that incorporate multiple intelligences into the curriculum are recognised. The findings of this study argue the notion that multiple intelligences based language curriculum offers diverse learning opportunities. As a future educator, I believe that it is important to cater for individual abilities, to nurture student cognitive, social and emotional abilities.
    • Schwarzer, D., Haywood, A., & Lorenzen, C. (2003). Fostering mulitiliteracy in a linguistically diverse classroom. National Council of Teachers of English. 80, 453 - 460. Retrieved from http://www.csun.edu/~bashforth/305_PDF/305_ME3/LanguageVarieties/LanguageVarities_LangArts/Fosteri ngMultiliteracyMonolingualTeacher_LA_Jul2003.pdf The article offers insight into a classroom where students are from diverse cultural backgrounds, speaking many different native languages. The empowering role that multiliterate pedagogy provides for diversity, in a teacher’s classroom practice is outlined. It is suggested that children's home languages should not be ignored, as they play a key role in a language development. The notion that community members should become partners with teachers in the development of multilingual/multiliterate approaches is explored. I would like to acknowledge the high, placed on the role of the teacher offering cultural and linguistic awareness to her students and will strive as an educator to foster sensitivity, tolerance and language development through a multiliterate program.
    • Mills, K. (2006). Discovering design possibilities through a pedagogy of multiliteracies. Journal of Learning Design. 1(3), 61 - 73. Retrieved from http://eprints.qut.edu.au/6710/1/6710.pdf  Mills identifies that contemporary educational practice requires a multiliterate approach due to a dynamic internal and external environment, in a diverse learning environment. Mills employs the New London Group pedagogy of situated practice, overt instruction, critical framing and transformed practice. Mill notes the importance of multimodal text, being a combination of visual, audio, spatial and gestural modes, and how the text provides meaning-making.  As a teacher I will employ a multiliterate pedagogy to offer positive learning experiences, however I am acutely aware that effective learning requires an understanding of the impact of culture and language on the ability of the student to engage in learning experiences.
    • The New London Group. (1996). A pedagogy of multiliteracies: designing social futures. Harvard Educational Review. 66(1), 60 – 92.  The authors argue that as educators we need to overcome the limitations that traditional literacy teachings offered, focusing on a multiliterate approach that will recognize the diversity in modern society. Educators and Students must see themselves as active participants in the social changes that occur in our society, as they are makers of the future. This article also details the four components of multiliterate pedagogy of situated practice, overt instruction and critical framing and transformed practice.  This article supports the notion of students being active participants in their learning as they transfer social and cultural learning into meaning-making as discussed in Mills. Therefore the implications of traditional teaching methods need to be renewed through a multiliterate approach offering culturally diverse learning experiences for all students.
    • Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010a). Learning to read: The primary school years. In V, Somerset (Eds.), Literacy reading, writing, & children’s literature. (4th ed. pp. 197-219). Victoria. Oxford University Press.  Winch, Johnston, March, Ljungdahl and Holliday state, that the more students engage with text that offers complex reading tasks the easier it is for them to develop empowering literacy skills. Reading and literacy sessions are discussed in full and various teaching strategies for specific literacy sessions are considered. These include; guided reading, the building of semantic knowledge, grammatical knowledge, and phonological– graphological knowledge. As children develop the literacy skills offered to them must become more complex and varied, through both explicit and systematic teaching pedagogy’s.  As an educator I will strive to integrate pedagogical practices that integrate a growing range of skills and knowledge, enabling my students to understand text effectively.
    • Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010b). Managing classroom literacy. In V, Somerset (Eds.), Literacy reading, writing, & children’s literature. (4th ed. pp. 220-243). Victoria. Oxford University Press.  Winch, Johnston, March, Ljungdahl and Holliday (2010), recognise the importance of managing the literacy classroom. It is suggested that, grouping and learning strategies are an essential part of good teaching practices. Student diversity is discussed a literacy session is presented and how resources can be used successfully to support the learning needs of the students. A plan for the structure of a literacy session is offered, showing that through a well-rounded and achievable program, students can thrive.  As a teacher it is important to understand the requirements of a literacy classroom and utilize skills, showing the ability to co-ordinate a range of learning experiences.
    • Do your students use Multiliterate ICT practices?
    • Overview of Essay – The nature of literacy pedagogies is changing as we move through the 21st century, characterised by a rapidly changing technological world. This paper will explore the changes in literacy teaching practices across the curriculum, showing an understanding of language learning and the need for multiliterate pedagogies in modern technological classrooms. Teaching strategies and resources that support literacy and language development for students from diverse backgrounds will be reflected upon critically evaluating the importance of a wide repertoire of positive pedagogies. Borsheim, Merritt and Reed (2008) state that in order to prepare students of the 21st century, a powerful shift has occurred from traditional literacy teachings, to 21st century teaching practices that are reflective of technologies’ evolving nature.
    • The Australian Curriculum defines 21st century literacy as, “a flexible, sustainable command of a set of capabilities in the use and production of traditional texts and new communications technology using spoken language, print and multimedia”
    • As cited in Bull & Anstey (2010, p. 59). higher order thinking is applied to multiliteracy pedagogy as; “learning about literacy and literate practices, how paper, live, electronic texts and the five semiotic systems work in social, cultural, economic, and political contexts”. Vygotsky’s theory of scaffolding, is critical to a multiliterate approach as the learning process can be offered in a variety of stepped way (Mills, 2006). Through the effective use of Gardner’s multiple intelligence theories, to accommodate multiliterate practices, teachers can transform pedagogic styles to develop multiple teaching strategies that enhance social emotional and cognitive abilities (Dastgoshadeh & Jalizadeh, 2011).
    • Project-based learning and problem-based activities enhance active learning, providing students with the opportunity to build on independent learning styles. Students can be guided through literacy sessions that involve a number of group tasks. A guided reading session, could begin with students reading a text with the teacher, relaying the story, dramatising the events in the story and rewriting the story in their own words using a visual clue as a prompt (Winch, Johnston, March, Ljungdahl & Holliday, 2010a)
    • Fostering multiliteracy in diverse classroom environment is one of the many challenges of teachers in the 21st century. Schwarzer, Haywood and Lorenzen (2003), offer strategies that foster multiliteracy in diverse classrooms, as a student’s native language is nurtured in a learning environment. For example, using multiliterate print, illustrating alphabets of the native languages spoken and learning simple words and phrases, in the student’s first language, are positive strategies that build upon multiliterate skills in a bilingual classroom (Schwarzer et al. 2003).
    • According to Howell (2012), one of the strongest reasons for digital literacy skill to be developed is the impact they have on student engagement and motivation. Howell (2012), suggests a shift in the outcomes of education from; where schooling was once focused on learning outcomes to where schooling focus’s on developing students’ abilities as life-long learners.
    • As computer technology continues to evolve in the 21st century, multimodal/multiliterate practices will continue to revolutionise literacy educative practices.
    • Self-Reflection on ICT Learning  Employing a wide range of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in my classroom pedagogy is my goal, as a future educator. Davis et al. (as cited in Academy Publisher, 2012), states that the integration of ICT in classrooms highlights student interest, and attainment of tasks. A deep knowledge of ICT’s is fundamental to education in the 21st century and it is my aim to familiarize and extend my knowledge of ICT’s in order to establish an eclectic teaching pedagogy, where I can extend and transform student learning.  During my study as a future educator, I have used Wix, Prezi, Powerpoint, Glogster, Moviemaker and many social networking and resource development sites. Engagement with these websites has challenged me, however through persistence I have overcome my fears, adding to my technological repertoire. A Power Point offered the visual aspects I required to present this assignment and provided a clear, communicative digital platform. This presentation has been customised, using a design template and then adding to each slide using images that represent the information.
    •  Good learning in my experience is immersing students in new and exciting learning experiences, where they gain higher order thinking skills. Kopfer, Osterweil, Groff and Haas (2009), recognise that ICT practices engage students, supporting learning styles in the technological world. Through this task, I have learnt about many varied pedagogical strategies used in a multiliterate pedagogy that will undoubtedly assist with the building of my personal pedagogical practices.  My future goal as an educator is to implement a variety of ICT practices that support and engage students, through the implementation of a powerful and eclectic teaching pedagogy. Smart Board Lap Top Computers Flip Video CamcordersDesktop Computers Smart Slate Digital Cameras
    • References Academy Publisher. (2012). Journal of language teaching and research. Volume 3, 1. Retrieved from http://www.academypublisher.com/jltr/vol03/no01/jltr0301.pdf Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2006). Teaching and learning multiliteracies: changing times, changing literacies (pp. 56-81). Newark, Delaware: International Reading Association. Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2010) Helping teachers to explore multimodal texts. Curriculum & Leadership Journal. Volume 8, 1-5. Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA). (2013). The Australian curriculum. Retrieved March 12, 2014, from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/ Borsheim, C., Merritt, K., & Reed, D. (2008). Beyond technology for technology’s sake: advancing multiliteracies in the twenty-first century. Clearing House: A Journal of Educational strategies, Issues and Ideas, 8287-90. Retrieved from http://cfritts.pbworks.com/f/Beyond+Technology.pdf Churches, A. (2008). Blooms taxonomy blooms digitally. Retrieved March 13, 2014, from http://edweb.sdsu.edu/courses/EDTEC470/sp09/5/bloomstaxanomy.html Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2009) Multiliteracies: new literacies new learning, Pedagogies: an International journal, 4: 164-195. Dastgoshadeh, A., & Jalizadeh, K. (2011). Multiple intelligences-based language curriculum for the third millennium. International Conference on Education, Research and Innovation. IPEDR Vol 18, 57-62. Retrieved from http://www.ipedr.com/vol18/13-ICERI2011-R10021.pdf Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT. Digital pedagogies for collaboration and creativity. Oxford University Press. South Melbourne. Klopfer, E., Osterweil, S., Groff, J., & Haas, J. (2009). Using technology of today, in the classroom today. Retrieved from http://education.mit.edu/papers/GamesSimsSocNets_EdArcade.pdf Mills, K. (2006). Discovering design possibilities through a pedagogy of multiliteracies. Journal of Learning Design. Vol 1(3), 61 - 73. Retrieved from http://eprints.qut.edu.au/6710/1/6710.pdf Schwarzer, D., Haywood, A., & Lorenzen, C. (2003). Fostering mulitiliteracy in a linguistically diverse classroom. National Council of Teachers of English. Vol 80, 453 - 460. Retrieved March 13, 2014, from http://www.csun.edu/~bashforth/305_PDF/305_ME3/LanguageVarieties/LanguageVarities_LangArts/FosteringMultiliteracyMonolingualTeacher_ LA_Jul2003.pdf The Higher Education Academy. (2014). Pedagogic theory. Retrieved March 13, 2014, from http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/resources/detail/internationalisation/isl_pedagogic_theory Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010a). Learning to read: The primary school years. In V, Somerset (Eds.), Literacy reading, writing, & children’s literature. (4th ed. pp. 197-219). Victoria. Oxford University Press.    
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