Understanding Resolution &
      Digital Cameras
                             Ann Ware
                 Bald Knob High Sch...
Resolution
 Understanding digital cameras requires that
 we know how resolution works.
 Resolution is determined by how ...
Measuring Resolution

 Resolution is measured
 by the number of
 horizontal pixels times
 the number of vertical
 pixels
...
Megapixels
 The quality of a picture is measured by its
 resolution—how many pixels it has; the
 current measurement is m...
Resolution
 With computer graphics, there are three
 different resolutions to consider:
  ◦ the image’s resolution (pixel...
Image Resolution

   The image’s resolution is measured in pixels.

   Most cameras allow you to change the resolution
 ...
Monitor Resolution

   Monitor resolution is measured in horizontal and
    vertical pixels
    ◦ Example: 800 x 600

  ...
Printer Resolution

   Printer resolution is measured in dpi—dots per inch.

   The quality of the printed image is goin...
Other points to consider
 When purchasing a camera, you should also
 research the following specifications:
 ◦ Storage Ca...
Storage Devices
 Memory Card
 Internal Memory (RAM)




                          10
Storage Capacity

 The number of pictures you can take before
 sending them to your computer is determined
 by two things...
Transferring Images
  Card reader
  USB cable
  Bluetooth




                      12
Power Source

 Regular Batteries
 Rechargeable batteries
  ◦ Alkaline
  ◦ Nickel-metal hydride (NiMH)
  ◦ Lithium-ion (L...
LCDs vs ViewFinder
 LCD—Pro’s                          View Finder—Pro’s
 ◦ Shows you the exact image             Uses ...
Zoom
   Optical zoom actually enlarges the image—
    measured in X
    ◦ example: 8X—increases an image 8 times

   Dig...
16
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  • The arrow is a link to the last slide, which is a picture of a lily. A portion of the center of the lily is enlarged in the top right corner to show the pixels.
  • Question: What happens if the image resolution is higher than the monitor resolution? Answer: You will not be able to view the image at its best qualityQuestion: What if the printer resolution is lower than the image resolution? Answer: Your printed image won’t be the optimum quality. To get the optimum quality you will have to have it printed professionally.
  • Understanding resolution digital_cameras

    1. 1. Understanding Resolution & Digital Cameras Ann Ware Bald Knob High School 1
    2. 2. Resolution  Understanding digital cameras requires that we know how resolution works.  Resolution is determined by how many pixels (picture elements) or dpi (dots per inch) are available.  The image you see is simply a grid of small squares or circles filled in with color. The more squares or circles—the sharper the image. 2
    3. 3. Measuring Resolution  Resolution is measured by the number of horizontal pixels times the number of vertical pixels ◦ Example: 3072 x 2304 3
    4. 4. Megapixels  The quality of a picture is measured by its resolution—how many pixels it has; the current measurement is megapixels  A megapixel is a grid containing one million pixels (one million squares of color)—technically, that is an image with a resolution of 1024x1024 pixels 4
    5. 5. Resolution  With computer graphics, there are three different resolutions to consider: ◦ the image’s resolution (pixels) ◦ the monitor’s resolution (pixels) ◦ the printer’s resolution (dpi) 5
    6. 6. Image Resolution  The image’s resolution is measured in pixels.  Most cameras allow you to change the resolution before you take the picture.  The higher the resolution—the clearer the image— the bigger the file size. 6
    7. 7. Monitor Resolution  Monitor resolution is measured in horizontal and vertical pixels ◦ Example: 800 x 600  If an image is taken at 1024x768, but your monitor can only display 800x600—that’s as good as it gets! 7
    8. 8. Printer Resolution  Printer resolution is measured in dpi—dots per inch.  The quality of the printed image is going to be determined by both the resolution of the image AND the resolution of the printer. 8
    9. 9. Other points to consider  When purchasing a camera, you should also research the following specifications: ◦ Storage Capacity ◦ Transferring Images ◦ Power Source ◦ LCD vs. Optical View Finder ◦ Zoom 9
    10. 10. Storage Devices  Memory Card  Internal Memory (RAM) 10
    11. 11. Storage Capacity  The number of pictures you can take before sending them to your computer is determined by two things: ◦ the resolution of the image ◦ the type of storage 11
    12. 12. Transferring Images  Card reader  USB cable  Bluetooth 12
    13. 13. Power Source  Regular Batteries  Rechargeable batteries ◦ Alkaline ◦ Nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) ◦ Lithium-ion (Li-Ion)  AC 13
    14. 14. LCDs vs ViewFinder  LCD—Pro’s  View Finder—Pro’s ◦ Shows you the exact image  Uses less battery that will be recorded ◦ Easy to view … delete  Easier to see images in images, etc. bright light ◦ Displays menu  LCD—Con’s  View Finder—Con’s ◦ Drains battery—uses ½ life  Shows close approximation of battery of the final image—not the ◦ Difficult to see in bright light real thing  Difficult for some people to see 14
    15. 15. Zoom  Optical zoom actually enlarges the image— measured in X ◦ example: 8X—increases an image 8 times  Digital zoom takes a portion of an image an enlarges it electronically; the image loses resolution when the camera enlarges it; also measured in X  Macro allows you to take close-up pictures of objects that are small and enlarge them so they appear larger. 15
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