Resume Writing Pmi Presentation 2009

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  • Candidates must understand that the resume they submit online and the resume they want to take with them to an interview are NOT the same.
  • I know this sounds so simple, however people don’t try to reverse their role and think in this way. What would be important for you to know to say “I want to interview this candidate”. Don’t have 3 paragraphs for a position you only held for 6 months or 1 paragraph for a job you were in for 5 years
  • If you were with the same company for 7 years, show movement of responsibility or titles with dates and break it down into paragraphs

Transcript

  • 1. RESUME WRITING Presenting your resume in 2009 Prepared by: Pam Parker ( [email_address] ) for FWPMI (5/09) Avizion Technologies Group , IT Staffing Services Firm - 972.267.7950
  • 2. Resume Format
    • Keep it Simple, when submitting on-line do not use Tables, Cells, HTML, Graphics – it is harder to convert
    • Do NOT put your name and contact information in the Header or Footer (some Applicant Tracking Systems won’t load it into the database)
    • Remember an online resume will be imported into some type of company database for future use so you want some form of contact information on the resume e.g. email or phone or both is preferred
  • 3. Writing a resume
    • Ask yourself, if I was hiring for my position, what would I want to see on that resume?
    • Remember, your resume should answer questions for the person reviewing it, not cause them to ask questions.
    • Length should be commensurate with years of total experience as well as depth on one job with how long you were in that position .
  • 4. Resume Details
    • Dates are important (month/year).
    • Chronological resumes are preferred by hiring managers, they want to know when and where you had the experience. (Accomplishment/Project oriented resumes advocated by Outplacement firms are not preferred)
    • Put the most recent information first (the last 5 years of your career are most applicable in a job search).
    • Titles – don’t use internal ones that are obscure, use ones that describe your role. (or match the position you are applying for)
    • Show progression in your career - If at the same job for years, don’t just put one big paragraph; break it up with promotions, change in responsibilities or any way that shows growth.
  • 5. Resume Objective/Summary
    • Tailor to the position you are applying for (don’t say Manager if applying to Lead).
    • Target details to the position applied for (e.g. total years with required skills).
    • Use facts: In reviews, my past supervisor’s describe my strengths as…Project was completed on time and with in budget…
    • Summary should include some information that isn’t found in the body of the resume (soft skills).
  • 6. Resume Experience
    • Don’t use I.
    • Do talk about your responsibilities and not what the company, department, or group did.
    • What duties did you perform on a day to day basis that are required to do the job?
    • Provide more detail on the last five years and less detail beyond that time frame.
  • 7. Resume Experience cont’d
    • If you mention a technical skill in a summary, show details about it in the experience section.
    • Highlight at least one big project you worked on and what your responsibilities were for helping the project succeed. (# of resources, budget, team member)
    • Remember, the resume is a first impression of you and may be your only opportunity to get an interview.
    • Read what you write (grammar), be consistent in format, pay attention to tense and spell check.
  • 8. Actual comments from Director
    • GENERAL OBSERVATIONS  
    • Resumes are very important and say a lot about your candidates.  If they are messy, badly formatted, contain grammatical errors or annoyingly formatted they make a bad first impression.  Crummy resumes generally are disregarded. 
    • Job Hopping is not a good thing.  If you have a candidate who is a job hopper, it won’t fly on this requisition.  Save your time and ours and save them for a different requisition.  If your candidate is a contractor/consultant who has done a number of contracts to completion please make sure that this is clear in your candidate’s documents.  If it appears on the resume that the candidate is jumping around from full-time job to full-time job the resume won’t go far in the process. 
    • Director is looking for a candidate that has held a management position for a significant amount of time for a large company that has a controlled environment.  Being CIO of a 1 person shop doesn’t meet the spirit of what we are looking for.  If the candidate doesn’t have the right experience save the resume for a different req. 
    • If your candidate has the right experience, make sure that you include it on the bio/overview along with the following “what was the size of the company”, “size of their staff”, and “why they left that opportunity”.
  • 9. Director comments on Resumes
    • ACTUAL FEEDBACK FOR CANDIDATE Resumes
    • DM – Would like to set up an interview with this candidate. 
    • AS – Little mgmt experience.  Resume indicates more of a lead than a mgr. (pass)
    • MV – Too much job hopping.  (pass)
    • CJ – Appears to be 100% Windows.  Needs to have Unix as well.  (pass)
    • MR – To much job hopping.  Resume formatting issues. (pass)
    • LT – Too much job hopping. Too many high level jobs in too short of a time. (pass)
    • TW – Grammatical errors on resume.  Items referenced on Candidate Data Sheet not on Resume. Appears to be more of a “do”er than a Director. (pass)