What makes Agile Development so different?
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What makes Agile Development so different?

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What makes Agile Development so different?

What makes Agile Development so different?

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What makes Agile Development so different? What makes Agile Development so different? Presentation Transcript

  • The nuts and boltsAgile of Agile practices, terms andPrimer metrics www.rallydev.com   1 ©  2009  Rally  So4ware  Development,  Inc.  
  • What  is  All  the  Buzz  About?  •  Agile  is  documented  to  help  large  projects  cut  @me-­‐to-­‐ market  by  50%  and  increase  produc@vity  by  25%  •  It  shares  values  with  Lean  manufacturing  to  promote:     –  disciplined  project  management   –  frequent  inspect  and  adapt  cycles  that  minimize  waste   –  self-­‐organizing,  cross-­‐func@onal  teams  that  make  and  meet   commitments   –  engineering  prac@ces  that  rapidly  deliver  high-­‐quality   so4ware   It  is  common  to  combine     Scrum  project   management  prac@ces     with  Extreme   Programming  (XP)   engineering  prac@ces   www.rallydev.com   2 ©  2009  Rally  So4ware  Development,  Inc.  
  • What  Makes  Agile  Development  So  Different?   Agile  projects  build  so4ware  incrementally,  typically  using  short  itera@ons  of     1-­‐4  weeks,  to  keep  development  aligned  with  changing  business  needs  So,  instead  of  a  single  pass,  6-­‐18  month  release  that  predicts  all  requirements  and  risks  up  front  …  Agile  adapts  to  frequent  feedback  by  delivering  working,  tested  code  every  1-­‐4  week  itera@on   www.rallydev.com   3 ©  2009  Rally  So4ware  Development,  Inc.  
  • Agile  Rewards  Value  Delivery     over  Illusion  of  Control   Waterfall   Agile   Fixed Scope Resources Time AdapDve   Rewarded  for     delivering  value     PredicDve   Rewarded  for  providing   illusion  of  control  Estimated Resources Time Scope Early  scope  commitment  drives  cost  &   Scope  is  es@mated  and  allowed  to  evolve  to   schedule  es@mates.    But  needs  change   stay  aligned  with  needs.  Teams  commit  to   faster  than  so4ware  can  be  delivered.   always  work  on  highest  value  features   www.rallydev.com   4 ©  2009  Rally  So4ware  Development,  Inc.  
  • The  Structure  of  Each  Agile  Team  is  Similar   The  ScrumMaster  is  a  facilita@ve   team  leader  who  ensures  the  team  is   fully    produc@ve  so  they  can  make   and  meet  commitments.   Responsibili@es  include:   • Enable  close  coopera@on  across  all   roles  and  func@ons   • Remove  blocks  and  shield  the  team   from  disturbances     •   Work  with  management  to  track   progress  and  re-­‐factor  structures  &   processes  of  the  organiza@on  The  Product  Owner  drives  the  product  from  the  business  perspec@ve.     • Ensure  Agile s  inspect  and  adapt  Responsibili@es  include:   processes  are  followed,  including  • Define  the  requirements  and  priori@ze  their  value   Daily  Stand-­‐ups,  Planning  Mee@ngs,  • Determine  the  release  date  and  content;    • Lead  the  itera@on  and  release  planning  mee@ngs   Demo  Reviews  and  Retrospec@ves.  • Ensure  the  team  is  always  working  on  the  most  valuable    requirements    • Accept  or  reject  work  results  of  each  itera@on www.rallydev.com   5 ©  2009  Rally  So4ware  Development,  Inc.  
  • Agile  Scales  by  ReplicaDng  Agile  Teams   Team-­‐of-­‐Teams    We  don t  increase   Program  Steering  Agile  team  size!   Portfolio Mgt &   GovernanceInstead,  we  grow  our  disciplines  to  synchronize  many  distributed  teams.   Release Mgt Mul@-­‐Team  Program   Architecture Council Agile  improves   collabora@on  across  all   roles  with  greater   transparency  into  work    in  progress,  quality,   readiness  and  costs.   www.rallydev.com   6 ©  2009  Rally  So4ware  Development,  Inc.  
  • A  Team  Works  in  IteraDons  to  Deliver  User  Stories   The  team  plans  stories  into  their  itera@on  based  on  each  story s   priority  and  size.       The  team  uses  their  velocity  (how  much  they  get  done     per  itera@on),  to  decide  how  much  scope  to  plan  into  the   itera@on.   www.rallydev.com   7 ©  2009  Rally  So4ware  Development,  Inc.  
  • User  Story  is  a    Requirement  from  the  User s   PerspecDve   During  release  planning,  user   stories  are  given  a  rough  size   esDmate  using  a  rela?ve  scale   like  points.       Later,  during  itera@on   planning,  we ll  break  the  story   down  into  tasks.   Agile  is  very  disciplined  about   producing  useful,  realis@c   es@mates.  Make  sure  you   As a buyer, I want to have check  out  the    "Es@ma@on"   my shipping information Slideshow  in  this  series  for  a   confirmed so I get a chance thorough  introduc@on.     to correct any errors www.rallydev.com   8 ©  2009  Rally  So4ware  Development,  Inc.  
  • Stories  are  Implemented  by  Tasks    Real  work  is  more  granular  than  stories.  Each  story  is  really  a  collec@on  of  Tasks.  We  wait  to  break  stories  into  tasks  un@l  the  story  is  planned  for  the  current  itera@on.    Elabora@ng  details  just-­‐in-­‐?me  takes  advantage  of  learning  and  feedback.  Tasks  are  es@mated  in  hours,  typically  sized  between  2-­‐12  hours.   www.rallydev.com   9 ©  2009  Rally  So4ware  Development,  Inc.  
  • Stories  are  Validated  with  Acceptance  Tests   www.rallydev.com   10 ©  2009  Rally  So4ware  Development,  Inc.  
  • When  is  a  Story  Done?   Teams  determine  what  done  means.   Criteria  can  include:   –   all  tasks  completed  (dev,  test,  doc,  etc.)   –   all  acceptance  tests  running  and  passing   –   zero  open  defects   –   accepted  by  the  Product  Owner   –   could  be  delivered  to  users  www.rallydev.com   11 ©  2009  Rally  So4ware  Development,  Inc.  
  • Agile  Metrics  Make  Progress  Visible  www.rallydev.com   12 ©  2009  Rally  So4ware  Development,  Inc.  
  • Quick  Glossary  of  Some  Agile  Terms  User  Story:  A  simple  expression  of  a  requirement,  commonly  in  the  form  of:  As  a  <User  Role>  I  want  <Func@onality>  so  that  <Business  Value>      Task:  A  single  unit  of  work  that  helps  a  Story  reach  delivery/acceptance    EsDmaDng:  Gauging  the  rela?ve  size  of  a  User  Story  in  points,  and/or  the  number  of  hours  to  complete  a  task    Ranked  Backlog:  A  list  of  User  Stories  priori@zed  by  importance/  value  to  the  customer    Velocity:  The  rate  at  which  a  team  completes  work,  usually  measured  in  story  points.    Used  to  decide  how  many  stories  to  plan  into  the  release.    Release  Planning:  Es@mate  stories  in  points,  and  select  and  rank  them  in  order  to  sa@sfy  the  release  condi@ons  of  schedule,  scope  and  resources.  Agile  teams  respond  to  feedback  and  typically  adjust  scope  to  meet  the  release  theme  and  date.    IteraDon  Planning:  Select  stories  to  be  delivered  by  the  itera@on  deadline,  detail  their  acceptance  criteria  and  es@mate  their  tasks  in  hours.      Commitment:  En@re  team  commits  to  the  itera@on  stories  and  schedule     www.rallydev.com   13 ©  2009  Rally  So4ware  Development,  Inc.  
  • Next  Steps  •  View  these  other  Agile  Planning  guides:   www.rallydev.com/learn_agile/agile_planning/   –  Agile  Es@ma@ng   –  Release  Planning   –  Itera@on  Planning   www.rallydev.com   14 ©  2009  Rally  So4ware  Development,  Inc.