Writing as Rhetorical Problem Solving
Rhetorical Situation <ul><li>Audience </li></ul><ul><li>Exigency/Purpose </li></ul><ul><li>The Writer </li></ul><ul><li>Th...
Discourse Communities <ul><li>Groups of people who differ in </li></ul><ul><li>--the vocabulary they use to describe the w...
Writing as Cognitive Act <ul><li>Writers constantly reformulate goals while composing (recursivity). </li></ul><ul><li>Exp...
 
Why (Teaching) Writing is Hard…. <ul><li>“ Even though a teacher gives 20  </li></ul><ul><li>students the same assignment,...
Analyzing Persona (Ethos) <ul><li>First, Second of Third person discourse? </li></ul><ul><li>Simple or complex vocabulary ...
Analyzing Pathos (emotional appeal) <ul><li>Enargeia: Vivid description of an event that  </li></ul><ul><li>produces an em...
Analyzing Audiences <ul><li>What values or assumptions does the audience hold about the world? </li></ul><ul><li>What do t...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Writing as Rhetorical Problem Solving

1,847 views
1,624 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,847
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
10
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Writing as Rhetorical Problem Solving

  1. 1. Writing as Rhetorical Problem Solving
  2. 2. Rhetorical Situation <ul><li>Audience </li></ul><ul><li>Exigency/Purpose </li></ul><ul><li>The Writer </li></ul><ul><li>The Text </li></ul>
  3. 3. Discourse Communities <ul><li>Groups of people who differ in </li></ul><ul><li>--the vocabulary they use to describe the world </li></ul><ul><li>--the linguistic style and genres they prefer </li></ul><ul><li>--the kinds of “evidence” they value </li></ul><ul><li>--the questions / issues they find relevant </li></ul>
  4. 4. Writing as Cognitive Act <ul><li>Writers constantly reformulate goals while composing (recursivity). </li></ul><ul><li>Experienced writers develop more complex and specific goals. </li></ul><ul><li>Writers formulate goals based on existing knowledge (mental models) for writing. </li></ul>
  5. 6. Why (Teaching) Writing is Hard…. <ul><li>“ Even though a teacher gives 20 </li></ul><ul><li>students the same assignment, the </li></ul><ul><li>writers themselves create the problem </li></ul><ul><li>they solve”—Flower and Hayes </li></ul>
  6. 7. Analyzing Persona (Ethos) <ul><li>First, Second of Third person discourse? </li></ul><ul><li>Simple or complex vocabulary / sentence structures? </li></ul><ul><li>Building goodwill / identification with audience? </li></ul><ul><li>Establishing credibility? </li></ul><ul><li>Image of the writer that emerges? </li></ul>
  7. 8. Analyzing Pathos (emotional appeal) <ul><li>Enargeia: Vivid description of an event that </li></ul><ul><li>produces an emotional response </li></ul><ul><li>Honorific language (subtly presents a person / topic in a respectful admiring light) </li></ul><ul><li>Pejorative language (subtly presents a person / topic in a negative light) </li></ul>
  8. 9. Analyzing Audiences <ul><li>What values or assumptions does the audience hold about the world? </li></ul><ul><li>What do they already know, believe, and feel about your topic? </li></ul><ul><li>What kinds of language and “evidence” do they value? </li></ul><ul><li>What will motivate them to trust you as an author and want to read your work? </li></ul>

×